Associated British Picture Corporation

British International PicturesWardour FilmsAssociated British-PathéWarner-Pathé DistributorsABPCWarner-PathéAssociated BritishAssociated British Pictures CorporationWarner-PatheABFD
Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC), originally British International Pictures (BIP), was a British film production, distribution and exhibition company active from 1927 until 1970 when it was absorbed into EMI.wikipedia
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ABC Cinemas

ABCAssociated British CinemasABC Cinema
The company was founded during 1927 by Scottish solicitor John Maxwell after he had purchased British National Studios and its Elstree Studios complex and merged it with his ABC Cinemas circuit, renaming the company British International Pictures.
Originally a wholly owned subsidiary of Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC), it operated between the 1930s and the 1980s.

John Maxwell (producer)

John Maxwell
The company was founded during 1927 by Scottish solicitor John Maxwell after he had purchased British National Studios and its Elstree Studios complex and merged it with his ABC Cinemas circuit, renaming the company British International Pictures.
With BIP (which was renamed Associated British Picture Corporation in 1933) John Maxwell began a major production programme.

Blackmail (1929 film)

Blackmail1929Blackmail'' (1929 film)
During its early years the company's most prominent work was that directed by Alfred Hitchcock, including the film Blackmail (1929), usually regarded as the first British all-talkie.
After starting production as a silent film, British International Pictures decided to adapt Blackmail into a separate sound film.

BBC Elstree Centre

Neptune HouseBritish National StudiosBBC Elstree Studios
The company was founded during 1927 by Scottish solicitor John Maxwell after he had purchased British National Studios and its Elstree Studios complex and merged it with his ABC Cinemas circuit, renaming the company British International Pictures.
The series made by the affiliated ITC, such as The Saint, Gideon's Way, and The Prisoner, were shot on 35 mm film at other companies' neighbouring Elstree facilities or elsewhere, mostly at the well-known, and similarly named (Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) / EMI) Elstree (Film) Studios, and MGM-British Studios.

Elstree Studios

ElstreeElstree Film StudiosBBC Elstree Centre
The company was founded during 1927 by Scottish solicitor John Maxwell after he had purchased British National Studios and its Elstree Studios complex and merged it with his ABC Cinemas circuit, renaming the company British International Pictures.
BIP became Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) in 1933.

Alfred Hitchcock

HitchcockHitchcockianSir Alfred Hitchcock
During its early years the company's most prominent work was that directed by Alfred Hitchcock, including the film Blackmail (1929), usually regarded as the first British all-talkie.
Hitchcock began work on his tenth film, Blackmail (1929), when its production company, British International Pictures (BIP), converted its Elstree studios to sound.

Robert Clark (film executive)

Robert Clark
Robert Clark was head of production for the company between 1949 and 1958, and insisted on tight budgeting and the use of pre-existing properties such as books or plays as these already had a demonstrated "public value".
Robert Clark (1905–1984) was a Scottish film executive best known for being head of production at Associated British Picture Corporation in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Frederick Gotfurt

Frederic Gotfurt
German-born Frederick Gotfurt was Clark's scenario editor in this period, but his command of English was imperfect and the contracted actor Richard Todd doubted Gotfurt's ability to access the quality of the dialogue in a script.
In the 1940s and 1950s he was scenario editor at Associated British Picture Corporation and was heavily relied upon by head of production Robert Clarke.

Richard Todd

Richard Andrew Palethorpe Todd
German-born Frederick Gotfurt was Clark's scenario editor in this period, but his command of English was imperfect and the contracted actor Richard Todd doubted Gotfurt's ability to access the quality of the dialogue in a script.
His former agent, Robert Lennard, had become a casting agent for Associated British Picture Corporation and advised him to try out for the Dundee Repertory Company.

Sound film

talkietalkiessound
During its early years the company's most prominent work was that directed by Alfred Hitchcock, including the film Blackmail (1929), usually regarded as the first British all-talkie.
A British International Pictures (BIP) production, it was recorded on RCA Photophone, General Electric having bought a share of AEG so they could access the Tobis-Klangfilm markets.

J. Lee Thompson

J. L. ThompsonThompson
During this period though, the company produced its best remembered titles such as The Dam Busters (Michael Anderson, 1954), and Ice Cold in Alex (1958), whose director J. Lee Thompson was ABPC's most productive during the 1950s.
British International Pictures hired him as a screenwriter.

Joseph Grossman

He appointed Joseph Grossman, formerly manager of the Stoll Studios, his Studio Manager.
(Joe married Oswald Stoll's secretary, Esther Josephs, in 1922.) In 1927, John Maxwell, manager of British International Pictures (later Associated British Picture Corporation), offered him the Studio Manager job at Elstree, where he remained until his death.

Michael Anderson (director)

Michael AndersonAndersonHis father
During this period though, the company produced its best remembered titles such as The Dam Busters (Michael Anderson, 1954), and Ice Cold in Alex (1958), whose director J. Lee Thompson was ABPC's most productive during the 1950s.
Anderson then signed a contract with Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) for whom he wound up making five films.

The Young Ones (1961 film)

The Young Onesfilm of the same namemotion picture
Later successful features from ABPC itself included several films built around the pop singer Cliff Richard, such as The Young Ones (1961) and Summer Holiday (1963).
The film was produced by the Associated British Picture Corporation and shot at their Elstree Studios.

Gaumont-British

Gaumont BritishGaumont British DistributorsGaumont British Picture Corporation
Hitchcock left the company in 1933 to work for the rival British Gaumont.
Rivals ABC had only Warner Brothers, MGM and the productions of its parent company Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC).

EMI Films

Anglo-EMIThorn EMI Screen EntertainmentEMI Television
(For the subsequent history, see EMI Films.) The entire ABPC library is now owned by StudioCanal.
The company was formed after the takeover of Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) in 1969 by EMI, following the acquisition of Warner Bros.' shares in ABPC the previous year.

The Dam Busters (film)

The Dam BustersThe DambustersDam Busters
During this period though, the company produced its best remembered titles such as The Dam Busters (Michael Anderson, 1954), and Ice Cold in Alex (1958), whose director J. Lee Thompson was ABPC's most productive during the 1950s.
Following the success of the book The Dam Busters (a RAF-approved history of 617 Squadron), Robert Clark the head of production at Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) approached its author Paul Brickhill about acquiring the film rights as a vehicle for Richard Todd.

StudioCanal

Studio CanalLe Studio Canal+Anton Capital Entertainment
(For the subsequent history, see EMI Films.) The entire ABPC library is now owned by StudioCanal.

ABC Weekend TV

ABCABC TelevisionAssociated British Corporation
In this case, the parent company was the Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC), which initially did not wish to become involved with the new broadcasting system, but was persuaded to do so by the Independent Television Authority (ITA) and the manager of its Pathé News subsidiary Howard Thomas, who became the new company's managing director.

Anglo-Amalgamated

Anglo-Amalgamated Film DistributorsAnglo AmalgamatedInsignia Films
In 1962, the company acquired 50% of the shares of Anglo-Amalgamated, and made an arrangement with the Grade Organisation to support the production of films by independent producers.
In 1962, Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC) purchased 50% of the shares of Anglo Amalgamated.

Summer Holiday (1963 film)

Summer Holidayfilm of the same nameSummer Holiday'' (1963 film)
Later successful features from ABPC itself included several films built around the pop singer Cliff Richard, such as The Young Ones (1961) and Summer Holiday (1963).
In April 1962 Associated British Picture Corporation of Elstree bought three used RTs (RT2305 (KGU334), RT2366 (KGU395), and RT4326 (NLE990)) from London Transport.

Pathé News

British PathéBritish PathePathe News
Pathé changed hands again in 1933, when it was acquired by British International Pictures, which was later known as Associated British Picture Corporation.

Ice Cold in Alex

Ice-Cold in AlexDesert Attack
During this period though, the company produced its best remembered titles such as The Dam Busters (Michael Anderson, 1954), and Ice Cold in Alex (1958), whose director J. Lee Thompson was ABPC's most productive during the 1950s.

EMI

EMI MusicEMI RecordsEMI Music Canada
Associated British Picture Corporation (ABPC), originally British International Pictures (BIP), was a British film production, distribution and exhibition company active from 1927 until 1970 when it was absorbed into EMI.

Warner Bros.

Warner BrothersWarner Bros. PicturesWarner Bros
The studio was partly owned by Warner Bros. from about 1940 until 1969; the American company also owned a stake in ABPC's distribution arm, Warner-Pathé, from 1958.