Asterisk

*asterisksstarsplat******/?*hartachAsterisk (*)asterisk *asterisks,
{{Punctuation marks|wikipedia
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Linguistic reconstruction

reconstructedreflexreflexes
In historical linguistics, the asterisk marks words or phrases that are not directly recorded in texts or other media, and that are therefore reconstructed on the basis of other linguistic material (see also comparative method).
Texts discussing linguistic reconstruction commonly preface reconstructed forms with an asterisk to distinguish them from attested forms.

Paragroup

** (haplogroup)
*In human genetics, * is used to denote that someone is a member of a haplogroup and not any of its subclades (see * (haplogroup)).
In human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups, paragroups are typically represented by an asterisk placed after the main haplogroup.

Grammaticality

ungrammaticalgrammaticalgrammatical correctness
In most areas of linguistics, but especially in syntax, an asterisk in front of a word or phrase indicates that the word or phrase is not used because it is ungrammatical.
Linguists may use words, numbers, or typographical symbols such as question marks or asterisks, to assign to a linguistic string.

Splatbook

Certain categories of character types in role-playing games are called splats, and the game supplements describing them are called splatbooks. This usage originated with the shorthand "*book" for this type of supplement to various World of Darkness games, such as Clanbook: Ventrue (for Vampire: The Masquerade) or Tribebook: Black Furies (for Werewolf: The Apocalypse), and this usage has spread to other games with similar character-type supplements. For example, Dungeons & Dragons Third Edition has had several lines of splatbooks: the "X & Y" series including Sword & Fist and Tome & Blood prior to the "3.5" revision, the "Complete X" series including Complete Warrior and Complete Divine, and the "Races of X" series including Races of Stone and Races of the Wild.
In newsgroups, these were called *books (the asterisk on a computer keyboard being used as a wildcard character).

Matrix (mathematics)

matrixmatricesmatrix theory
The conjugate transpose, Hermitian transpose, or adjoint matrix of a matrix.
In complex matrices, symmetry is often replaced by the concept of Hermitian matrices, which satisfy A ∗ = A, where the star or asterisk denotes the conjugate transpose of the matrix, that is, the transpose of the complex conjugate of A.

Convolution

convolvedconvolvingkernel
f ∗ g is a convolution of f with g.
, using an asterisk or star.

Vertical service code

calling featureservice featureCLASS
They are used to navigate menus in Touch-Tone systems such as Voice mail, or in Vertical service codes.
A vertical service code (VSC) is a sequence of digits and the signals star and number sign dialed on a telephone keypad or rotary dial to enable or disable certain telephony service features.

Note (typography)

footnotefootnotesendnote
The asterisk is used to call out a footnote, especially when there is only one on the page. Less commonly, multiple asterisks are used to denote different footnotes on a page (i.e., *, **, ***). Typically, an asterisk is positioned after a word or phrase and preceding its accompanying footnote. Other characters are also used for this purpose, including †, ‡, superscript numbers (as in Wikipedia), etc. In marketing and advertising, asterisks or other symbols are used to refer readers discreetly to terms or conditions for a certain statement, the "small print".
Typographical devices such as the asterisk or dagger may also be used to point to footnotes; the traditional order of these symbols in English is *, †, ‡, §, ‖, ¶.

Bullet (typography)

bulletbulletsbullet point
Asterisks are sometimes used as an alternative to typographical bullets to indicate items of a list.
Several regular symbols, such as * (asterisk), - (hyphen), . (period), and even o (lowercase O), are conventionally used in ASCII-only text or other environments where bullet characters are not available.

Asterism (typography)

asterismAsteriscusasterisms
A group of three asterisks arranged in a triangular formation is called an asterism.
In typography, an asterism ("group of stars") is the typographic symbol consisting of three asterisks placed in a triangle: ⁂.

Dagger (typography)

daggerdouble dagger
Dagger (typography)
A dagger, obelisk, or obelus is a typographical symbol that usually indicates a footnote if an asterisk has already been used.

List of typographical symbols

typographic symboltypographical symbol
List of typographical symbols
Asterisk

Arabic star

Arabic Five Pointed Star
Arabic star
The Arabic star is a punctuation mark developed to be distinct from the asterisk .

Italic type

italicitalicsitalicized
Asterisks can be used in textual media to represent *emphasis* when bold or italic text is not available (e.g., Twitter, text messaging).
Asterisk is rotated instead of slanted (e.g.: Bookman Old Style, ITC Garamond).

Sustain pedal

damper pedalpedaldampers
In musical notation the sign 20px indicates when the sustain pedal of the piano should be lifted.
An alternative (and older) notation is the use of indicating where the sustain pedal should be depressed, and an asterisk showing where it should be lifted (see Für Elise for a famous example).

Dual-tone multi-frequency signaling

DTMFtouch-tonetouch tone
They are used to navigate menus in Touch-Tone systems such as Voice mail, or in Vertical service codes. On a Touch-Tone telephone keypad, the asterisk (called star, or less commonly, palm or sextile) is one of the two special keys (the other is the number sign (pound sign or hash, hex or, less commonly, octothorp or square)), and is found to the left of the zero.
This led to the addition of the number sign octothorpe asterisk or "star" keys as well as a group of keys for menu selection: A, B, C and D. In the end, the lettered keys were dropped from most phones, and it was many years before the two symbol keys became widely used for vertical service codes such as *67 in the United States of America and Canada to suppress caller ID.

Reference mark

Reference mark
In contrast to the European asterisk, it is not used for connecting a specific place in the text directly to the footnote, but rather for notes directly before or after the passage.

Emphasis (typography)

boldboldfaceemphasis
Asterisks can be used in textual media to represent *emphasis* when bold or italic text is not available (e.g., Twitter, text messaging).
In Internet usage, asterisks are sometimes used for emphasis (as in "That was *really* bad").

Star (glyph)

starsStar
Star (glyph)
Asterisk

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
In economics, the use of an asterisk after a letter indicating a variable such as price, output, or employment indicates that the variable is at its optimal level (that which is achieved in a perfect market situation). For instance, p* is the price level p when output y is at its corresponding optimal level of y*.

Variable (mathematics)

variablesvariableunknown
In economics, the use of an asterisk after a letter indicating a variable such as price, output, or employment indicates that the variable is at its optimal level (that which is achieved in a perfect market situation). For instance, p* is the price level p when output y is at its corresponding optimal level of y*.

Price

pricesretail priceoverpriced
In economics, the use of an asterisk after a letter indicating a variable such as price, output, or employment indicates that the variable is at its optimal level (that which is achieved in a perfect market situation). For instance, p* is the price level p when output y is at its corresponding optimal level of y*.

Output (economics)

outputeconomic outputoutputs
In economics, the use of an asterisk after a letter indicating a variable such as price, output, or employment indicates that the variable is at its optimal level (that which is achieved in a perfect market situation). For instance, p* is the price level p when output y is at its corresponding optimal level of y*.

Employment

employeeemployeremployees
In economics, the use of an asterisk after a letter indicating a variable such as price, output, or employment indicates that the variable is at its optimal level (that which is achieved in a perfect market situation). For instance, p* is the price level p when output y is at its corresponding optimal level of y*.

General Certificate of Secondary Education

GCSEsGCSEGeneral Certificates of Secondary Education
In the GCSE and A-Level examinations in the United Kingdom and the PSLE in Singapore, A* ("A-star") is a special top grade that is distinguished from grade A. (This will phase out starting from 2021)