Athabaskan languages

AthabaskanAthabascanAthabaskan languageAthapaskanAthabaskan-speakingAthabascan languagesAthapascanAthabaskansAthabaskan language familyAthapaskan languages
Athabaskan (also spelled Athabascan, Athapaskan or Athapascan, and also known as Dene) is a large family of indigenous languages of North America, located in western North America in three groups of contiguous languages: Northern, Pacific Coast and Southern (or Apachean).wikipedia
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Navajo language

NavajoNavajo alphabetMode and Aspect
Chipewyan is spoken over the largest area of any North American native language, while Navajo is spoken by the largest number of people of any native language north of Mexico.
Navajo is an Athabaskan language, and along with Apache languages, make up the southernmost branch of the family.

Gwichʼin language

Gwich'inGwich’inGwichʼin
Five Athabaskan languages are official languages in the Northwest Territories, including Chipewyan (Dënesųłıné), Dogrib or Tłı̨chǫ Yatıì, Gwich'in (Kutchin, Loucheux), and the Northern and Southern variants of Slavey.
The Gwichʼin language (Dinju Zhuh Kʼyuu) belongs to the Athabaskan language family and is spoken by the Gwichʼin First Nation (Canada) / Alaska Native People (United States).

Slavey language

SlaveyNorth SlaveySouth Slavey
Five Athabaskan languages are official languages in the Northwest Territories, including Chipewyan (Dënesųłıné), Dogrib or Tłı̨chǫ Yatıì, Gwich'in (Kutchin, Loucheux), and the Northern and Southern variants of Slavey.
Slavey ( also Slave, Slavé) is an Athabaskan language spoken among the Slavey and Sahtu people of Canada in the Northwest Territories where it also has official status.

Northwest Territories

North-West TerritoriesNTNorth West Territories
The 32 Northern Athabaskan languages are spoken throughout the interior of Alaska and the interior of northwestern Canada in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, as well as in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
The northernmost region of the territory is home to Inuvialuit, part of Inuit Nunangat called Nunangit, while the southern portion is called Denendeh (an Athabaskan language word meaning "our land").

Apache

ApachesApache IndiansApachean
Athabaskan (also spelled Athabascan, Athapaskan or Athapascan, and also known as Dene) is a large family of indigenous languages of North America, located in western North America in three groups of contiguous languages: Northern, Pacific Coast and Southern (or Apachean).
The Apache and Navajo tribal groups of the North American Southwest speak related languages of the Athabaskan language family.

Denaʼina language

Dena'inaDena'ina languageDena'ina Athabascan
Denaʼina, also Tanaina, is the Athabaskan language of the region surrounding Cook Inlet.

Tanana Athabaskans

TananaLower TananaMiddle Tanana
The Tanana Athabaskans, Tanana Athabascans or Tanana Athapaskans are an Alaskan Athabaskan peoples of the Athabaskan-speaking ethnolinguistic group.

Eyak language

Eyakeya
Eyak and Athabaskan together form a genealogical linguistic grouping called Athabaskan–Eyak (AE) – well demonstrated through consistent sound correspondences, extensive shared vocabulary, and cross-linguistically unique homologies in both verb and noun morphology.
The closest relatives of Eyak are the Athabaskan languages.

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
Athabaskan (also spelled Athabascan, Athapaskan or Athapascan, and also known as Dene) is a large family of indigenous languages of North America, located in western North America in three groups of contiguous languages: Northern, Pacific Coast and Southern (or Apachean).
Native groups can also be classified by their language family (e.g., Athapascan or Uto-Aztecan).

Koyukon language

KoyukonCentral Koyukonkoy
The Athabaskan language is spoken along the Koyukuk and the middle Yukon River in western interior Alaska.

Tanacross language

TanacrossTanacross Athabascantcb
Tanacross (also Transitional Tanana) is an endangered Athabaskan language spoken by fewer than 60 people in eastern Interior Alaska.

Holikachuk language

HolikachukhoiHolikachuk Athabaskan
Holikachuk (own name: Doogh Qinag ) was an Athabaskan language formerly spoken at the village of Holikachuk (Hiyeghelinhdi) on the Innoko River in central Alaska.

Upper Kuskokwim language

Upper KuskokwimKuskokwimkuu
The Upper Kuskokwim language (also called Kolchan or Goltsan or Dinak'i) is an Athabaskan language of the Na-Dené language family.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
The 32 Northern Athabaskan languages are spoken throughout the interior of Alaska and the interior of northwestern Canada in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, as well as in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
To the northwest of the province are the peoples of the Na-Dene languages, which include the Athapaskan-speaking peoples and the Tlingit, who lived on the islands of southern Alaska and northern British Columbia.

Chilcotin language

ChilcotinTsilhqot'inTsilhqot'in language
Nicola may be intermediate between Kwalhioqua–Tlatskanai and Chilcotin.
Chilcotin (also Tsilhqotʹin, Tsilhqot’in, Tsilhqut’in, Tzilkotin) is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken in British Columbia by the Tsilhqot’in people.

Northern Athabaskan languages

Northern AthabaskanNorthern Athabaskan languageNorthern Athabascan
For detailed lists including languages, dialects, and subdialects, see the respective articles on the three major groups: Northern Athabaskan, Pacific Coast Athabaskan, Southern Athabaskan.
Northern Athabaskan is a geographic sub-grouping of the Athabaskan language family spoken by indigenous peoples in the northern part of North America, particularly in Alaska (Alaskan Athabaskans), the Yukon and the Northwest Territories.

Southern Athabaskan languages

Southern AthabaskanApacheSouthern Athabaskan language
For detailed lists including languages, dialects, and subdialects, see the respective articles on the three major groups: Northern Athabaskan, Pacific Coast Athabaskan, Southern Athabaskan.
Southern Athabaskan (also Apachean) is a subfamily of Athabaskan languages spoken primarily in the Southwestern United States (including Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah) with two outliers in Oklahoma and Texas.

Tlingit language

Tlingitlanguagedialect of the Tlingit language
Tlingit is distantly related to the Athabaskan–Eyak group to form the Na-Dene family, also known as Athabaskan–Eyak–Tlingit (AET).
al.) showed a strong connection to Eyak and hence to the Athabaskan languages.

Pacific Coast Athabaskan languages

Pacific Coast AthabaskanPacific CoastPacific Coast Athabaskan language
For detailed lists including languages, dialects, and subdialects, see the respective articles on the three major groups: Northern Athabaskan, Pacific Coast Athabaskan, Southern Athabaskan.
Pacific Coast Athabaskan is a geographical and possibly genealogical grouping of the Athabaskan language family.

Tsetsaut language

Tsetsauttxc
Similarly to Nicola, there is very limited documentation on Tsetsaut.
The Tsetsaut language is an extinct Athabascan language formerly spoken by the now-extinct Tsetsaut in the Behm and Portland Canal area of Southeast Alaska and northwestern British Columbia.

Tutchone language

TutchoneSouthern TutchoneNorthern Tutchone
Tutchone is an Athabaskan language spoken by the Northern and Southern Tutchone First Nations in central and southern regions of Yukon Territory, Canada.

Kaska language

Kaskakkz
The Kaska language originated from the family of Athabaskan languages.

Babine-Witsuwitʼen language

Babine-Witsuwit'enBabine-WitsuwitʼenBabine
Babine–Witsuwitʼen or Nadotʼen-Wets'uwetʼen is an Athabaskan language spoken in the Central Interior of British Columbia.

Ahtna language

AhtnaAhtna Athabascanaht
The comparison of some animal names in the three Athabaskan languages:

Sekani language

SekanisekSekani name
The Sekani language is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Sekani people of north-central British Columbia, Canada.