A report on Athens

Athena, patron goddess of Athens; (Varvakeion Athena, National Archaeological Museum)
Delian League, under the leadership of Athens before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC
The Lycabettus Hill from the Pedion tou Areos park.
Snowfall in Athens on 16 February 2021
Changing of the Greek Presidential Guard in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Syntagma Square.
The entrance of the National Gardens, commissioned by Queen Amalia in 1838 and completed by 1840
View of Vila Atlantis, in Kifissia, designed by Ernst Ziller.
Beach in the southern suburb of Alimos, one of the many beaches in the southern coast of Athens
The former mayor of Athens Giorgos Kaminis (right) with the ex–Prime Minister of Greece, George Papandreou Jr. (left).
View of the Athens Urban Area and the Saronic Gulf.
View of Neapoli, Athens
View of Athens and the Saronic Gulf from the Philopappou Hill.
The Athens Urban Area within the Attica Basin from space
Athens population distribution
The seven districts of the Athens Municipality
Ermou street, the main commercial street of Athens, near Syntagma Square.
The 28-storey Athens Tower was completed in 1971, and in a city often bound by low-rise regulations to ensure good views of the Acropolis, is Greece's tallest.
Athens railways network (metro, proastiakós and tram)
Athens Metro train (3rd generation stock)
Suburban rail
Vehicle of the Athens Tram.
The new Athens International Airport, that replaced the old Hellinikon International Airport, opened in 2001.
Interchange at the Attiki Odos airport entrance
View of Hymettus tangent (Periferiaki Imittou) from Kalogeros Hill
Facade of the Academy of Athens
The National Library of Greece.
The Artemision Bronze or God of the Sea, that represents either Zeus or Poseidon, is exhibited in the National Archaeological Museum.
The Cathedral of Athens (Athens Metropolis).
The Caryatides (Καρυάτιδες), or Maidens of Karyai, as displayed in the new Acropolis Museum. One of the female sculptures was taken away from the Erechteion by Lord Elgin and is kept in the British Museum.
Interior of the Academy of Athens, designed by Theophil Hansen.
The Zappeion Hall
Two apartment buildings in central Athens. The left one is a modernist building of the 1930s, while the right one was built in the 1950s.
The inner yard, still a feature of thousands of Athenian residences, may reflect a tradition evident since Antiquity.
The Old Parliament House, now home to the National History Museum. View from Stadiou Street.
The National Archaeological Museum in central Athens
The Acropolis Museum
The National Theatre of Greece, near Omonoia Square
The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Centre, home of the Greek National Opera and the new National Library.
10,000-meter final during the 2004 Olympic Games
Tondo of the Aison Cup, showing the victory of Theseus over the Minotaur in the presence of Athena. Theseus was responsible, according to the myth, for the synoikismos ("dwelling together")—the political unification of Attica under Athens.
The earliest coinage of Athens, {{circa}} 545–525/15 BC
Coat of Arms of the Duchy of Athens during the rule of the de la Roche family (13th century)
The Roman Agora and the Gate of Athena in Plaka district.
The Temple of Olympian Zeus with river Ilisos by Edward Dodwell, 1821
The Entry of King Otto in Athens, Peter von Hess, 1839.
The Stadiou Street in Central Athens in 1908.
thumb|Temporary accommodation for the Greek refugees from Asia Minor in tents in Thiseio. After the Asia Minor Catastrophe in 1922 thousands of families settled in Athens and the population of the city doubled.
The Hellenic Parliament
The Presidential Mansion, formerly the Crown Prince Palace, in Herodou Attikou Street.
The Maximos Mansion, official office of the Prime Minister of the Hellenic Republic, in Herodou Attikou Street.
The Athens City Hall in Kotzia Square was designed by Panagiotis Kolkas and completed in 1874.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.eie.gr/archaeologia/gr/arxeio_more.aspx?id=39|title=ΑΡΧΕΙΟ ΝΕΟΤΕΡΩΝ ΜΝΗΜΕΙΩΝ - Δημαρχείο Αθηνών|website=www.eie.gr|access-date=26 February 2019|archive-date=26 February 2019|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190226172829/http://www.eie.gr/archaeologia/gr/arxeio_more.aspx?id=39|url-status=live}}</ref>
The Embassy of France in Vasilissis Sofias Avenue.
The Italian Embassy in Vasilissis Sofias Avenue.
Fencing before the king of Greece at the 1896 Summer Olympics.
The Panathenaic Stadium of Athens (Kallimarmaron) dates back to the 4th century BC and has hosted the first modern Olympic Games in 1896.

Capital city of Greece.

- Athens

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Greece

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Country in Southeast Europe.

Country in Southeast Europe.

The entrance of the Treasury of Atreus (13th BC) in Mycenae
Herodotus (c. 484 BC—c. 425 BC), often considered the "father of history"
Fresco displaying the Minoan ritual of "bull leaping", found in Knossos
Greek territories and colonies during the Archaic period (750–550 BC)
The Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens, icon of classical Greece.
Alexander the Great, whose conquests led to the Hellenistic Age.
Map of Alexander's short-lived empire (334–323 BC). After his death the lands were divided between the Diadochi
The Antikythera mechanism (c. 100 BC) is considered to be the first known mechanical analog computer (National Archaeological Museum, Athens).
A view from the ancient royal Macedonian tombs in Vergina
The Odeon of Herodes Atticus in Athens, built in 161 AD
Dome of Hagia Sophia, Thessaloniki (8th century), one of the 15 UNESCO's Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of the city
The Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes, originally built in the late 7th century as a Byzantine citadel and beginning from 1309 used by the Knights Hospitaller as an administrative centre
The Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire after the death of Basil II in 1025
The Byzantine castle of Angelokastro successfully repulsed the Ottomans during the First Great Siege of Corfu in 1537, the siege of 1571, and the Second Great Siege of Corfu in 1716, causing them to abandon their plans to conquer Corfu.
The White Tower of Thessaloniki, one of the best-known Ottoman structures remaining in Greece.
The sortie (exodus) of Messolonghi, depicting the Third Siege of Missolonghi, painted by Theodoros Vryzakis.
The Battle of Navarino in 1827 secured Greek independence.
The Entry of King Otto in Athens, painted by Peter von Hess in 1839.
The territorial evolution of the Kingdom of Greece from 1832 to 1947.
Hellenic Army formation in the World War I Victory Parade in Arc de Triomphe, Paris, July 1919.
Map of Greater Greece after the Treaty of Sèvres, when the Megali Idea seemed close to fulfillment, featuring Eleftherios Venizelos as its supervising genius.
The Axis occupation of Greece.
People in Athens celebrate the liberation from the Axis powers, October 1944. Postwar Greece would soon experience a civil war and political polarization.
Signing at Zappeion by Constantine Karamanlis of the documents for the accession of Greece to the European Communities in 1979.
Navagio (shipwreck) bay, Zakynthos island
The Greek mainland and several small islands seen from Nydri, Lefkada
Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in Greece and mythical abode of the Gods of Olympus
The building of the Hellenic Parliament (Old Royal Palace) in central Athens.
Count Ioannis Kapodistrias, first governor, founder of the modern Greek State, and distinguished European diplomat
Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Prime Minister since 2019
Representation through: 
 embassy
 embassy in another country
 general consulate
 no representation
 Greece
GDP per capita development
A proportional representation of Greece exports, 2019
Greece's debt percentage since 1977, compared to the average of the Eurozone
Sun-drying of Zante currant on Zakynthos
Solar-power generation potential in Greece
Greek companies control 16.2% of the world's total merchant fleet making it the largest in the world. They are ranked in the top 5 for all kinds of ships, including first for tankers and bulk carriers.
Santorini, a popular tourist destination, is ranked as the world's top island in many travel magazines and sites.
The Rio–Antirrio bridge connects mainland Greece to the Peloponnese.
Thessaloniki Science Center and Technology Museum
Georgios Papanikolaou, a pioneer in cytopathology and early cancer detection
Hermoupolis, on the island of Syros, is the capital of the Cyclades.
Population pyramid of Greece in 2017
Our Lady of Tinos
Regions with a traditional presence of languages other than Greek. Today, Greek is the dominant language throughout the country.
A map of the fifty countries with the largest Greek diaspora communities.
The Academy of Athens is Greece's national academy and the highest research establishment in the country.
The Ionian Academy in Corfu, the first academic institution of modern Greece.
The Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus, still used for theatrical plays.
Close-up of the Charioteer of Delphi, a celebrated statue from the 5th century BC.
Towerhouses of Vatheia in Mani peninsula
Nobile Teatro di San Giacomo di Corfù, the first theatre and opera house of modern Greece
Parnassos Literary Society, painted by Georgios Roilos (Kostis Palamas is at the center)
A statue of Plato in Athens.
Cretan dancers of traditional folk music
Rebetes in Karaiskaki, Piraeus (1933). Left Markos Vamvakaris with bouzouki.
Mikis Theodorakis was one of the most popular and significant Greek composers
A Greek salad, with feta and olives.
Theodoros Angelopoulos, winner of the Palme d'Or in 1998, notable director in the history of the European cinema
Spyridon Louis entering the Panathenaic Stadium at the end of the marathon; 1896 Summer Olympics.
Angelos Charisteas scoring Greece's winning goal in the UEFA Euro 2004 Final
The Greek national basketball team in 2008. Twice European champions (1987 and 2005) and second in the world in 2006
Procession in honor of the Assumption of Virgin Mary (15 August)

Athens is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki and Patras.

Attica

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View from Anavyssos, looking south-east towards Palaia Fokaia.
Lake Marathon
The Temple of Poseidon (c.440 BC) at Cape Sounion, the southernmost point of Attica.
Delian League, under the leadership of Athens before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC. Attica is shown in red.
Ancient site of Vravrona
A Chalkidian Amphora, ca. 550 BC, showing a satyr startling a maenad. Museo Nazionale Etrusco, Rome.
View of Rhamnous
Spata airview
View over the excavation site towards Eleusis.
Saronida
Aerial view of Rafina.
The port of Lavrio

Attica (Αττική, Ancient Greek Attikḗ or Attikī́, or ), or the Attic Peninsula, is a historical region that encompasses the city of Athens, the capital of Greece and its countryside.

Piraeus

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Funerary relief for a girl, flanked by her parents (330/320 BC); Archaeological Museum of Piraeus.
The Long Walls connecting the ancient city of Athens to its port of Piraeus.
The customs office of the port of Piraeus in 1837. Watercolor by the Bavarian captain Ludwig Köllnberger.
The city of Piraeus and the church of Saint Spyridon; postcard of 1887.
Part of Eetioneia, the ancient gate to the harbour and part of the fortification of Piraeus, built during the Peloponnesian War.
The Veakeio Theater (former Skylitseio) on the hill of Kastella, with view to the Saronic Gulf, Mount Hymettus and the southeastern part of Athens.
The Piraeus Municipal Theatre
External view of the Hellenic Maritime Museum in Freatida.
Peace and Friendship Stadium
Inside the Karaiskakis Stadium
The building of the Maritime Retirement Fund (NAT)
Akti Miaouli at the port.
Inside view of Piraeus station, next to the seaport.
Preserved vintage trolleybus of Piraeus-Kastella line.
Church of Saint Spyridon; patron saint of Piraeus
University of Piraeus main building
Piraeus in the late 19th century
Map of Piraeus, 1908
A modern copy of the "Piraeus Lion"
View of Kastella
The church of St.Nicholas
Monument to Georgios Karaiskakis
Church of Sts. Constantine and Helen

Piraeus (Πειραιάς ; ) is a port city within the Athens urban area ("Greater Athens"), in the Attica region of Greece.

Delian League ("Athenian Empire") shown in yellow, Athenian territory shown in red, situation in 431 BC, before the Peloponnesian War.

Classical Athens

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The major urban centre of the notable polis (city-state) of the same name, located in Attica, Greece, leading the Delian League in the Peloponnesian War against Sparta and the Peloponnesian League.

The major urban centre of the notable polis (city-state) of the same name, located in Attica, Greece, leading the Delian League in the Peloponnesian War against Sparta and the Peloponnesian League.

Delian League ("Athenian Empire") shown in yellow, Athenian territory shown in red, situation in 431 BC, before the Peloponnesian War.
Early Athenian coin, 5th century BC. British Museum.
Delian League ("Athenian Empire") shown in yellow, Athenian territory shown in red, situation in 431 BC, before the Peloponnesian War.
The modern National Academy in Athens, with Apollo and Athena on their columns, and Socrates and Plato seated in front.
Map of ancient Athens showing the Acropolis in middle, the Agora to the northwest, and the city walls.
Map of the environs of Athens showing Piraeus, Phalerum, and the Long Walls
The Acropolis imagined in an 1846 painting by Leo von Klenze
The Temple of Hephaestus in modern-day Athens
Plan Roman Agora at Athens
Artist's impression of the Theatre of Dionysus
The Karyatides statues of the Erechtheion on its Acropolis.

In the classical period, Athens was a centre for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum, Athens was also the birthplace of Socrates, Plato, Pericles, Aristophanes, Sophocles, and many other prominent philosophers, writers and politicians of the ancient world.

Attica (region)

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Attica (Περιφέρεια Αττικής, ) is an administrative region of Greece, that encompasses the entire metropolitan area of Athens, the country's capital and largest city.

The Parthenon, a temple dedicated to Athena, located on the Acropolis in Athens, is one of the most representative symbols of the culture and sophistication of the ancient Greeks.

Ancient Greece

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Northeastern Mediterranean civilization, existing from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of classical antiquity (c.

Northeastern Mediterranean civilization, existing from the Greek Dark Ages of the 12th–9th centuries BC to the end of classical antiquity (c.

The Parthenon, a temple dedicated to Athena, located on the Acropolis in Athens, is one of the most representative symbols of the culture and sophistication of the ancient Greeks.
The Victorious Youth (c. 310 BC), is a rare, water-preserved bronze sculpture from ancient Greece.
Dipylon Vase of the late Geometric period, or the beginning of the Archaic period, c. 750 BC.
Early Athenian coin, depicting the head of Athena on the obverse and her owl on the reverse – 5th century BC
Map showing events of the first phases of the Greco-Persian Wars.
Delian League ("Athenian Empire"), immediately before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC
Alexander Mosaic, National Archaeological Museum, Naples.
Map showing the major regions of mainland ancient Greece and adjacent "barbarian" lands.
Greek cities & colonies c. undefined 550 BC (in red color)
Marble bust of Pericles with a Corinthian helmet, Roman copy of a Greek original, Museo Chiaramonti, Vatican Museums; Pericles was a key populist political figure in the development of the radical Athenian democracy.
Inheritance law, part of the Law Code of Gortyn, Crete, fragment of the 11th column. Limestone, 5th century BC
Fresco of dancing Peucetian women in the Tomb of the Dancers in Ruvo di Puglia, 4th–5th century BC
Gravestone of a woman with her slave child-attendant, c. undefined 100 BC
Mosaic from Pompeii depicting Plato's academy
Greek hoplite and Persian warrior depicted fighting, on an ancient kylix, 5th century BC
The carved busts of four ancient Greek philosophers, on display in the British Museum. From left to right: Socrates, Antisthenes, Chrysippus, and Epicurus.
The ancient Theatre of Epidaurus, 4th century BC
A scene from the Iliad: Hypnos and Thanatos carrying the body of Sarpedon from the battlefield of Troy; detail from an Attic white-ground lekythos, c. 440 BC.
The Antikythera mechanism was an analog computer from 150 to 100 BC designed to calculate the positions of astronomical objects.
The Temple of Hera at Selinunte, Sicily
Mount Olympus, home of the Twelve Olympians

The Aegean islands were added to this territory in 133 BC. Athens and other Greek cities revolted in 88 BC, and the peninsula was crushed by the Roman general Sulla.

Emblem of the 2004 Summer Olympics

2004 Summer Olympics

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Emblem of the 2004 Summer Olympics
The ceremony for the lighting of the flame was arranged as a pagan pageant, with dancing priestesses.
The Olympic Flame toured the world for the first time.
View of the ATHOC Technology Operations Center during the Games.
The Olympic Flame at the opening ceremony
Participating nations
Team numbers
Balloons falling at the Athens 2004 Olympics Closing ceremony
Army Maj. Zhanbo Jia from China (center) took the Gold medal in the Men's 50m Three-Position Rifle, Michael Anti from the United States (left) took the Silver and Christian Planer (right) from Austria took the Bronze
Athens Olympic Tennis Centre
Faliro Olympic Beach Volleyball Centre hosting beach volleyball
Galatsi Olympic Hall hosted gymnastics (rhythmic) and table tennis
Latvian postage stamp to commemorate the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens
USA men's lightweight coxless four at Athens Olympics
Archery rounds in the Panathenaic Stadium
Roger Federer representing Switzerland in tennis
Russian Igor Turchin (left) and American Weston Kelsey (right) duel in second round of men's individual épée

The 2004 Summer Olympics (Θερινοί Ολυμπιακοί Αγώνες 2004, Therinoí Olympiakoí Agónes 2004), officially the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad (Αγώνες της 28ης Ολυμπιάδας, Agónes tis 28is Olympiádas) and also known as Athens 2004 (Αθήνα 2004), were an international multi-sport event held from 13 to 29 August 2004 in Athens, Greece.

Warrior wearing a boar's tusk helmet, from a Mycenaean chamber tomb in the Acropolis of Athens, 14th–13th century BC.

Mycenaean Greece

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The last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1750 to 1050 BC. It represents the first advanced and distinctively Greek civilization in mainland Greece with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art, and writing system.

The last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1750 to 1050 BC. It represents the first advanced and distinctively Greek civilization in mainland Greece with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art, and writing system.

Warrior wearing a boar's tusk helmet, from a Mycenaean chamber tomb in the Acropolis of Athens, 14th–13th century BC.
Death mask, known as the Mask of Agamemnon, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, 16th century BC, probably the most famous artifact of Mycenaean Greece.
Fresco depicting a female figure in the acropolis of Mycenae, 13th century BC
Mycenaean panoply, found in Dendra, Argolid, c. undefined 1400 BC
Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East during the 14th century BC; Mycenaean Greece in purple
Marching soldiers on the Warrior Vase, c. 1200 BC, a krater from Mycenae
Invasions, destructions and possible population movements during the collapse of the Bronze Age, c. 1200 BC
Reconstruction of the political landscape in c. 1400–1250 BC mainland southern Greece
Mycenaean palace amphora, found in the Argolid
Mycenaean stirrup vase found in the acropolis of Ugarit, Eastern Mediterranean (c. 1400–1300 BC)
Gold earring, c. 1600 BC, Louvre Museum
Reconstruction of a Mycenaean ship
The Lady of Phylakopi; wheel-made pottery figurine of a goddess or priestess from the West Shrine in Phylakopi; late Helladic IIIA period, 14th century BC, Archaeological Museum of Milos
Mycenaean beads used for a necklace.
Tiryns, map of the palace and the surrounding fortifications
The hearth of the megaron of Pylos
Cyclopean masonry, backside of the Lion Gate, Mycenae, Greece
Part of the galleries within the walls of Tiryns
Replicas of Mycenaean swords and cups
Boar's tusk helmet with cheek-guards and a double bone hook on top. Mycenae, chamber Tomb 515, 14th – 13th centuries BC. N°6568
Silver repoussé rhyton with gold horns, from Grave Circle A at Mycenae, 16th century BC (Archaeological Museum, Athens)
Mycenaean Greek female figurines of Psi and Phi type; Benaki Museum, Athens
Fresco of a Mycenaean woman
Linear B tablets (Mycenaean Greek)

Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.

Landscape at Hymettus

Hymettus

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Mountain range in the Athens area of Attica, East Central Greece.

Mountain range in the Athens area of Attica, East Central Greece.

Landscape at Hymettus
Koutouki cave
Asteriou Monastery
The church of St Elijah at Koropi.

The height is 1,026 m at Evzonas (Εύζωνας) and the length is 16 km between Athens and the Saronic Gulf and 6 to 7 km from east to west.

The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the Hill of the Muses

Acropolis of Athens

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The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the Hill of the Muses
The Acropolis of Athens as seen from Mount Lycabettus
The wooded Hill of the Nymphs is half-visible on its right, and Philopappos Hill on the left, immediately behind. The Philopappos Monument stands where, in the distant background, the coast of Peloponnese meet the waters of the Saronic Gulf.
Warrior wearing a boar tusk helmet, from a Mycenaean chamber tomb in the Acropolis of Athens, 14th–13th century BC
Primitive Acropolis with the Pelargicon and the Old Temple of Athena.
Elevation view of a proposed reconstruction of the Old Temple of Athena. Built around 525 BC, it stood between the Parthenon and the Erechtheum. Fragments of the sculptures in its pediments are in the Acropolis Museum.
Destruction of the Acropolis by the armies of Xerxes I, during the Second Persian invasion of Greece, 480-479 BC
The Parthenon, as seen from the north-west.
The Erechtheum
The Propylaea
Depiction of the Venetian siege of the Acropolis of Athens during 1687.
1842 daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (the earliest photography of the site)
Idealized reconstruction of the Acropolis and Areios Pagos in Athens, Leo von Klenze, 1846.
Remains of the Theatre of Dionysus as of 2007
View east toward the Acropolis under construction during summer 2014.
Potentially tectonically susceptible structure

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historical significance, the most famous being the Parthenon.