Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAtheniansMunicipality of AthensAthinaAthínaAthenesCity of AthensAtticGreece
Athens (Αθήνα ; (pl.) ) is the capital and largest city of Greece.wikipedia
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Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
Athens (Αθήνα ; (pl.) ) is the capital and largest city of Greece.
Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of 2018; Athens is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki.

List of cities in Greece

City3,090,508Cities
Athens (Αθήνα ; (pl.) ) is the capital and largest city of Greece.
Greece's largest metropolitan centers and most influential urban areas, are those of Athens and Thessaloniki with metropolitan populations of approximately four million and one million inhabitants respectively.

Capital city

Capitaladministrative centerDistrict seat
Athens (Αθήνα ; (pl.) ) is the capital and largest city of Greece.
Examples are Athens, Bangkok, Brussels, Copenhagen, Cairo, London, Mexico City, Paris, Lima, Seoul and Tokyo.

Piraeus

Piraeus, GreecePireusPireaus
Classical Athens was a powerful city-state that emerged in conjunction with the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus.
Piraeus is located within the Athens urban area, 12 km southwest from its city centre (municipality of Athens), and lies along the east coast of the Saronic Gulf.

Attica (region)

AtticaAttica RegionAttic
Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence started somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC.
Attica Region (Περιφέρεια Αττικής, Periféria Attikís; ) is an administrative region of Greece, that encompasses the entire metropolitan area of Athens, the country's capital and largest city.

Polis

poleiscity-statescity-state
Classical Athens was a powerful city-state that emerged in conjunction with the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus.
The ancient Greeks did not always refer to Athens, Sparta, Thebes, and other poleis as such; they often spoke instead of the Athenians, Lacedaemonians, Thebans and so on.

Acropolis of Athens

AcropolisAthenian Acropolisthe Acropolis
Athens is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Acropolis of Athens and the medieval Daphni Monastery.
The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon.

Parthenon

Temple of AthenaThe Parthenon5th-century BC Athenian temple
The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon, considered a key landmark of early Western civilization.
The Parthenon (, Parthenónas) is a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patron.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
A center for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum, it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans.
At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC).

National Archaeological Museum, Athens

National Archaeological Museum of AthensNational Archaeological MuseumArchaeological Museum of Athens
Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum.
The National Archaeological Museum in Athens houses some of the most important artifacts from a variety of archaeological locations around Greece from prehistory to late antiquity.

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

University of AthensAthens UniversityAthens
Landmarks of the modern era, dating back to the establishment of Athens as the capital of the independent Greek state in 1834, include the Hellenic Parliament and the so-called "architectural trilogy of Athens", consisting of the National Library of Greece, the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Academy of Athens.
The National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA; Εθνικό και Καποδιστριακό Πανεπιστήμιο Αθηνών, Ethnikó ke Kapodistriakó Panepistímio Athinón), usually referred to simply as the University of Athens (UoA), is a public university in Zografou, Athens, Greece.

2004 Summer Olympics

20042004 Olympic Games2004 Olympics
Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics, making it one of only a handful of cities to have hosted the Olympics more than once.
The 2004 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad and commonly known as Athens 2004, was a premier international multi-sport event held in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004 with the motto Welcome Home.

National Library of Greece

National LibraryΕθνική ΒιβλιοθήκηGreek National Library
Landmarks of the modern era, dating back to the establishment of Athens as the capital of the independent Greek state in 1834, include the Hellenic Parliament and the so-called "architectural trilogy of Athens", consisting of the National Library of Greece, the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and the Academy of Athens.
The National Library of Greece is situated near the center of city of Athens.

Classical Athens

AthensAthenianAthenians
Classical Athens was a powerful city-state that emerged in conjunction with the seagoing development of the port of Piraeus.
In the classical period, Athens was a center for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Akademia and Aristotle's Lyceum, Athens was also the birthplace of Socrates, Plato, Pericles, Aristophanes, Sophocles, and many other prominent philosophers, writers and politicians of the ancient world.

Platonic Academy

AcademyPlato's AcademyNew Academy
A center for the arts, learning and philosophy, home of Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum, it is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans.
The Akademia was a school outside the city walls of ancient Athens.

Attic Greek

AtticAttic dialectClassical Attic
In Ancient Greek, the name of the city was Ἀθῆναι (Athênai, in Classical Attic) a plural. In antiquity, it was debated whether Athens took its name from its patron goddess Athena (Attic Ἀθηνᾶ, Athēnâ, Ionic Ἀθήνη, Athḗnē, and Doric Ἀθάνα, Athā́nā) or Athena took her name from the city.
Attic Greek is the Greek dialect of the ancient city-state of Athens.

Larger urban zone

functional urban areaLarger Urban Zonesurban zone
According to Eurostat in 2011, the functional urban area (FUA) of Athens was the 9th most populous FUA in the European Union (the 6th most populous capital city of the EU), with a population of 3.8 million people.

1896 Summer Olympics

18961896 Olympics1896 Athens
Athens was the host city of the first modern-day Olympic Games in 1896, and 108 years later it welcomed home the 2004 Summer Olympics, making it one of only a handful of cities to have hosted the Olympics more than once.
Organised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which had been created by Pierre de Coubertin, it was held in Athens, Greece, from 6 to 15 April 1896.

Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art

Museum of Cycladic ArtGoulandris Collection
Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum.
The Nicholas P. Goulandris Foundation - Museum of Cycladic Art is a museum of Athens.

Athena

Pallas AthenaPallasPallas Athene
In antiquity, it was debated whether Athens took its name from its patron goddess Athena (Attic Ἀθηνᾶ, Athēnâ, Ionic Ἀθήνη, Athḗnē, and Doric Ἀθάνα, Athā́nā) or Athena took her name from the city.
Athena was regarded as the patron and protectress of various cities across Greece, particularly the city of Athens, from which she most likely received her name.

Classical Greece

ClassicalClassical periodClassical Greek
The heritage of the classical era is still evident in the city, represented by ancient monuments and works of art, the most famous of all being the Parthenon, considered a key landmark of early Western civilization.
This century is essentially studied from the Athenian outlook because Athens has left us more narratives, plays, and other written works than the other ancient Greek states.

Daphni Monastery

DaphniDaphnionMonastery at Daphne
Athens is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Acropolis of Athens and the medieval Daphni Monastery.
Daphni or Dafni (Modern Greek: Δαφνί; Katharevousa: Δαφνίον, Daphnion) is an eleventh-century Byzantine monastery 11 km northwest of central Athens in the suburb of Chaidari, south of Athinon Avenue (GR-8A).

Mycenae

MyceneansMyceneMycenaean
It was possibly rendered in the plural later on, like those of Θῆβαι (Thêbai) and Μυκῆναι (Μukênai).
It is located about 120 km south-west of Athens; 11 km north of Argos; and 48 km south of Corinth.

Benaki Museum

Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum.
The Benaki Museum, established and endowed in 1930 by Antonis Benakis in memory of his father Emmanuel Benakis, is housed in the Benakis family mansion in downtown Athens, Greece.

Acropolis Museum

New Acropolis Museumhave been transferred
Athens is also home to several museums and cultural institutions, such as the National Archeological Museum, featuring the world's largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities, the Acropolis Museum, the Museum of Cycladic Art, the Benaki Museum and the Byzantine and Christian Museum.
It also lies over the ruins of a part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens.