Louis Jordan in New York City, c. undefined July 1946
The habanera rhythm shown as tresillo (lower notes) with the backbeat (upper note)
Atlantic Records logo from its inception in 1947 to 1966 (it was still used on 7" single releases), used again from 1979 to 1981 and 2004 to 2015.
Fats Domino in 1956
Atlantic logo used from 1966 to 2005. It was revived in 2015.
Piano excerpt from the rumba boogie "Mardi Gras in New Orleans" (1949) by Professor Longhair. 2–3 claves are written above for rhythmic reference.
"Weird Al" Yankovic edits Atlantic Records' Wikipedia page to read "YOU SUCK!" in the music video for the song "White & Nerdy"
3–2 clave written in two measures in cut-time
Tresillo answered by the backbeat, the essence of clave in African American music
Bo Diddley's "Bo Diddley beat" is a clave-based motif.
Ray Charles in 1971
Ruth Brown was known as the "Queen of R&B"
Della Reese
Sam Cooke
Eric Burdon & the Animals (1964)

Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding.

- Atlantic Records

Many of these hit records were issued on new independent record labels, such as Savoy (founded 1942), King (founded 1943), Imperial (founded 1945), Specialty (founded 1946), Chess (founded 1947), and Atlantic (founded 1948).

- Rhythm and blues
Louis Jordan in New York City, c. undefined July 1946

14 related topics with Alpha

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Ertegun circa 1960

Ahmet Ertegun

5 links

Turkish-American businessman, songwriter, record executive and philanthropist.

Turkish-American businessman, songwriter, record executive and philanthropist.

Ertegun circa 1960
The Ertegun family in 1942
Atlantic Records logo from its inception in 1947 to 1966 (it was still used on 7" single releases), used again from 1979 to 1981 and 2004 to 2015.
Ahmet (left) with his brother Nesuhi, around 1960

Ertegun was the co-founder and president of Atlantic Records.

He discovered and championed many leading rhythm and blues and rock musicians.

Charles in the 1960s

Ray Charles

4 links

American singer, songwriter and pianist.

American singer, songwriter and pianist.

Charles in the 1960s
Charles in 1968
Charles in 1971
Charles meeting with President Richard Nixon, 1972 (photo by Oliver F. Atkins)
Charles at the 2003 Montreal International Jazz Festival, one of his last public performances
Quincy Jones worked with Ray Charles.
Star honoring Charles on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 6777 Hollywood Boulevard
Statue by Andy Davis in Ray Charles Plaza in Albany, Georgia

Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic Records.

Al Green (1973), one of the genre's major pioneering artists

Soul music

3 links

Popular music genre that originated in the African American community throughout the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Popular music genre that originated in the African American community throughout the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Al Green (1973), one of the genre's major pioneering artists
Ray Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles
James Brown was known as the "Godfather of Soul"
Sam Cooke is acknowledged as one of soul music's "forefathers".
Solomon Burke recorded for Atlantic in the 1960s
Aretha Franklin is widely known as the "Queen of Soul"
Marvin Gaye shifted to a soul sound with his 1971 hit "What's Going On"
Levi Stubbs singing lead with the Four Tops in 1966
Soul singer Otis Redding was an electrifying stage presence
Isaac Hayes performing in 1973
Adele performing in 2016

It has its roots in African-American gospel music and rhythm and blues.

Soul music became popular for dancing and listening in the United States, where record labels such as Motown, Atlantic and Stax were influential during the Civil Rights Movement.

Jerry Wexler

3 links

Music journalist who turned music producer, and was a major influence on American popular music from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Music journalist who turned music producer, and was a major influence on American popular music from the 1950s through the 1980s.

He coined the term "rhythm and blues", and was integral in signing and/or producing many of the biggest acts of the time, including Ray Charles, the Allman Brothers, Chris Connor, Aretha Franklin, Led Zeppelin, Wilson Pickett, Dire Straits, Dusty Springfield and Bob Dylan.

Wexler became a partner in Atlantic Records in 1953.

Redding in 1967

Otis Redding

2 links

American singer and songwriter.

American singer and songwriter.

Redding in 1967
"Otis Redding Sittin' on the Dock of the Bay", statue in Gateway Park by Bradley Cooley and Bradley Cooley, Jr of Bronze By Cooley, 2003

He is considered one of the greatest singers in the history of American popular music and a seminal artist in soul music and rhythm and blues.

Already on the verge of bankruptcy, the label soon discovered that the Atco division of Atlantic Records owned the rights to his entire song catalog.

The Clovers

2 links

The group in 1957.

The Clovers are an American rhythm and blues/doo-wop vocal group who became one of the biggest selling acts of the 1950s.

Krefetz then brought them to the attention of Atlantic Records, which signed them in February 1951.

The "Stax-o-Wax" logo used during the Atlantic distribution years

Stax Records

2 links

American record company, originally based in Memphis, Tennessee.

American record company, originally based in Memphis, Tennessee.

The "Stax-o-Wax" logo used during the Atlantic distribution years
Hip Hug-Her, by Booker T. & the MG's (1967), showing the two different Atlantic-era Stax logos
The Stax Museum on McLemore Avenue in Memphis, founded in 2003, is a replica of the Stax studio, built on the same site where many of the historic Stax recording sessions took place. The original Stax studio was demolished in 1989.
Tennessee Historical Commission marker at the original site of Stax Records, now the site of the Stax campus.

According to ethnomusicologist Rob Bowman, the label's use of "one studio, one equipment set-up, the same set of musicians and a small group of songwriters led to a readily identifiable sound. It was a sound based in black gospel, blues, country, and earlier forms of rhythm and blues (R&B). It became known as southern soul music."

Following the death of Stax's biggest star, Otis Redding, in 1967, and the severance of the label's distribution deal with Atlantic Records in 1968, Stax continued primarily under the supervision of a new co-owner, Al Bell.

I Got a Woman

2 links

"I Got a Woman" (originally titled "I've Got a Woman") is a song co-written and recorded by American R&B and soul musician Ray Charles.

Atlantic Records released the song as a single in December 1954, with "Come Back Baby" as the B-side.

Brown in 1955

Ruth Brown

1 links

American singer-songwriter and actress, sometimes known as the "Queen of R&B".

American singer-songwriter and actress, sometimes known as the "Queen of R&B".

Brown in 1955
Ruth Brown performs at the Mambo Club in Wichita, Kansas, 1957
Ruth Brown in 1996

She was noted for bringing a pop music style to R&B music in a series of hit songs for Atlantic Records in the 1950s, such as "So Long", "Teardrops from My Eyes" and "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean".

Turner performing, 1973

Big Joe Turner

1 links

American singer from Kansas City, Missouri.

American singer from Kansas City, Missouri.

Turner performing, 1973
Turner performing in the 1955 film Rock 'n' Roll Revue

During his career, Turner was part of the transition from big bands to jump blues to rhythm and blues to rock and roll.

In 1951, while performing with the Count Basie Orchestra at Harlem's Apollo Theater as a replacement for Jimmy Rushing, he was spotted by Ahmet and Nesuhi Ertegun, who contracted him to their new recording company, Atlantic Records.