Atlas (rocket family)

AtlasAtlas rocketAtlas E rocketAtlas rocket familyAtlas DAtlas VAtlas IIAtlas familyAtlas family of rocketsAtlas Launch Vehicle
Atlas is a family of US missiles and space launch vehicles that originated with the SM-65 Atlas.wikipedia
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SM-65 Atlas

AtlasAtlas missileAtlas ICBM
Atlas is a family of US missiles and space launch vehicles that originated with the SM-65 Atlas.
The SM-65 Atlas was the first operational intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) developed by the United States and the first member of the Atlas rocket family.

Convair

Consolidated VulteeConsolidated Vultee Aircraft CorporationConsolidated-Vultee
The Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program was initiated in the late 1950s under the Convair Division of General Dynamics.
It also manufactured the first Atlas rockets, including the rockets that were used for the manned orbital flights of Project Mercury.

Atlas-Agena

Atlas LV-3A Agena-BAtlas SLV-3 Agena-DAtlas Agena
The Atlas-Agena and Atlas-Centaur satellite launch vehicles were also derived directly from the original Atlas.
It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets, and was launched 109 times between 1960 and 1978.

Atlas V

Atlas V 401Atlas V 541Atlas V 551
The Atlas V is still in service, with launches planned into the 2020s.
Atlas V is the fifth major version in the Atlas rocket family.

Intercontinental ballistic missile

ICBMintercontinental ballistic missilesICBMs
The Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program was initiated in the late 1950s under the Convair Division of General Dynamics.
Examples include R-7, Atlas, Redstone, Titan, and Proton, which was derived from the earlier ICBMs but never deployed as an ICBM.

RP-1

RG-1kerosenerocket-grade kerosene
Atlas was a liquid propellant rocket burning RP-1 fuel with liquid oxygen in three engines configured in an unusual "stage-and-a-half" or "parallel staging" design: two outboard booster engines were jettisoned along with supporting structures during ascent, while the center sustainer engine, propellant tanks and other structural elements remained connected through propellant depletion and engine shutdown.
RP-1 is a fuel in the first-stage boosters of the Soyuz-FG, Zenit, Delta I-III, Atlas, Falcon 9, Antares, and Tronador II rockets.

Atlas LV-3B

AtlasAtlas launch vehicleAtlas booster
However, from 1962 to 1963 Atlas boosters launched the first four US astronauts to orbit the Earth (in contrast to the preceding two Redstone suborbital launches).
Manufactured by American aircraft manufacturing company Convair, it was derived from the SM-65D Atlas missile, and was a member of the Atlas family of rockets.

SCORE (satellite)

Project SCORESCORE
On 18 December 1958, an Atlas was used to launch the Signal Communication by Orbiting Relay Equipment (SCORE) satellite, which was "the first prototype of a communications satellite, and the first test of any satellite for direct practical applications."
Launched aboard an American Atlas rocket on December 18, 1958, SCORE provided the second test of a communications relay system in space (the first having been provided by the USAF/NASA's Pioneer 1 ), the first broadcast of a human voice from space, and the first successful use of the Atlas as a launch vehicle.

Atlas E/F

Atlas FAtlas EAtlas F rocket
Missiles converted into Atlas E/F "space boosters" were used to launch the early "Block I" GPS satellites.
It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets.

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

Cape CanaveralCCAFSCape Kennedy
More than 300 Atlas launches have been conducted from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and 285 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Launches were conducted from two pads of the Launch Complex 36 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.
Redstone, Jupiter, Pershing 1, Pershing 1a, Pershing II, Polaris, Thor, Atlas, Titan and Minuteman missiles were all tested from the site, the Thor becoming the basis for the expendable launch vehicle (ELV) Delta rocket, which launched Telstar 1 in July 1962.

Liquid-propellant rocket

liquidliquid-fuel rocketbipropellant
Atlas was a liquid propellant rocket burning RP-1 fuel with liquid oxygen in three engines configured in an unusual "stage-and-a-half" or "parallel staging" design: two outboard booster engines were jettisoned along with supporting structures during ascent, while the center sustainer engine, propellant tanks and other structural elements remained connected through propellant depletion and engine shutdown.

General Dynamics

General Dynamics CorporationGeneral Dynamics Corp.Saco Defense
The Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program was initiated in the late 1950s under the Convair Division of General Dynamics.

Spaceport Florida Launch Complex 36

LC-36BLC-36ALaunch Complex 36
Launches were conducted from two pads of the Launch Complex 36 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.
It was used for Atlas launches by NASA and the US Air Force from 1962 until 2005.

Centaur (rocket stage)

CentaurCentaur upper stageCentaur-G
Atlas D missile-derived SLV-3s were used for orbital launches with the RM-81 Agena and Centaur upper stages.
The Centaur was originally developed for use with the Atlas launch vehicle family.

Atlas-Able

Atlas D AbleAtlas-Able 20Atlas-D Able
It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets, and was used to launch several Pioneer spacecraft towards the Moon.

Hypergolic propellant

hypergolichypergolic fuelhypergolic fuels
Beginning in 1960, the Agena upper-stage, powered by hypergolic propellant, was used extensively on Atlas launch vehicles.
The earliest ballistic missiles, such as the Soviet R-7 that launched Sputnik 1 and the U.S. Atlas and Titan-1, used kerosene and liquid oxygen.

Atlas II

Atlas IIASAtlas IIA Atlas IIAS
The Atlas-Centaur was evolved into the Atlas II, various models of which were launched 63 times between 1991 and 2004.
Atlas II was a member of the Atlas family of launch vehicles, which evolved from the successful Atlas missile program of the 1950s.

GPS satellite blocks

GPS satelliteBlock IIRBlock IIA
Missiles converted into Atlas E/F "space boosters" were used to launch the early "Block I" GPS satellites.
The Block I satellites were launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base using Atlas rockets that were converted intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Atlas SLV-3

Atlas
It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets.

Atlas H

It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets, and was used to launch five clusters of NOSS satellites for the US National Reconnaissance Office.

Atlas G

Atlas G Centaur-D1ARAtlas-G Centaur-D1AR
It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets, and was used to launch seven communication satellites during the mid to late 1980s.

Atlas III

Atlas IIIAAtlas IIIBIII
There were only six launches of the succeeding Atlas III, all between 2000 and 2005.
It was the first member of the Atlas family since the Atlas A to feature a "normal" staging method, compared to the previous Atlas family members, which were equipped with two jettisonable outboard engines on the first (booster) stage (with a single center engine serving as the sustainer).

Rocketdyne

Rocketdyne Propulsion & PowerAir Force Plant 56Boeing Rocketdyne
The latter utilizes RS-68 engines developed and produced domestically by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne.
The Atlas also had a short military career as a deterrent weapon, but the Atlas rocket family descended from it became an important orbital launcher for many decades, both for the Project Mercury manned spacecraft, and in the much-employed Atlas-Agena and Atlas-Centaur rockets.