Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

atomic bombing of HiroshimaHiroshimabombing of HiroshimaHiroshima and Nagasakiatomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasakiatomic bombingatomic bombing of NagasakiHiroshima bombingatomic bombingsbombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.wikipedia
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Nagasaki

Nagasaki, JapanNagasaki, NagasakiNagasaki City
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.
During World War II, the American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki made Nagasaki the second and, to date, last city in the world to experience a nuclear attack (at 11:02 a.m., August 9, 1945 'Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)').

509th Composite Group

509th Bombardment Group509th Composite Group (509 CG)
By August 1945, the Allies' Manhattan Project had produced two types of atomic bombs, and the 509th Composite Group of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was equipped with the specialized Silverplate version of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress that could deliver them from Tinian in the Mariana Islands.
It conducted the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945.

Hiroshima

Hiroshima, JapanHiroshima, HiroshimaHiroshima City
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.
Towards the end of World War II, Hiroshima is best remembered as the first city targeted by a nuclear weapon, when the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) dropped an atomic bomb on the city at 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945.

Air raids on Japan

air raidsAllied air raidsAllied bombing
This undertaking was preceded by a conventional and firebombing campaign which devastated 67 Japanese cities.
During early August 1945, the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were struck and mostly destroyed by atomic bombs.

Pacific War

Pacific TheaterPacificPacific Theatre
The war in Europe had concluded when Germany signed its instrument of surrender on May 8, 1945, and the Allies turned their full attention to the Pacific theater. In 1945, the Pacific War between the Empire of Japan and the Allies entered its fourth year.
The war culminated in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and other large aerial bomb attacks by the Allies, accompanied by the Soviet Union's declaration of war and invasion of Manchuria and other territories on 9 August 1945, resulting in the Japanese announcement of intent to surrender on 15 August 1945.

Fat Man

Nagasakisecond atomic bombNagasaki bomb
Another B-29 dropped a plutonium implosion bomb ("Fat Man") on Nagasaki three days later.
"Fat Man" was the codename for the nuclear bomb that was detonated over the Japanese city of Nagasaki by the United States on 9 August 1945.

Nuclear weapon

atomic bombnuclear weaponsnuclear
The United States detonated two nuclear weapons over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, with the consent of the United Kingdom, as required by the Quebec Agreement.
Since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, nuclear weapons have been detonated over two thousand times for testing and demonstration.

Boeing B-29 Superfortress

B-29 SuperfortressB-29Boeing B-29
By August 1945, the Allies' Manhattan Project had produced two types of atomic bombs, and the 509th Composite Group of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was equipped with the specialized Silverplate version of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress that could deliver them from Tinian in the Mariana Islands.
B-29s also dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki which contributed to the end of World War II.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
In the final year of World War II, the Allies prepared for a very costly invasion of the Japanese mainland.
Following the Potsdam Declaration by the Allies on 26 July 1945 and the refusal of Japan to surrender under its terms, the United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6and 9 August respectively.

Debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

debateprovoked long-running debatesacademic and political issues
Scholars have extensively studied the effects of the bombings on the social and political character of subsequent world history and popular culture, and there is still much debate concerning the ethical and legal justification for the bombings.
The debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki concerns the ethical, legal, and military controversies surrounding the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 August and 9 August 1945 at the close of World War II (1939–45).

Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in popular culture

Cultural treatments of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasakipopular culture
Scholars have extensively studied the effects of the bombings on the social and political character of subsequent world history and popular culture, and there is still much debate concerning the ethical and legal justification for the bombings.
This is a list of cultural products made about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
In 1945, the Pacific War between the Empire of Japan and the Allies entered its fourth year.
However, after many Allied victories and following the Soviet Union's declaration of war against Japan on August 9, 1945, and subsequent invasion of Manchuria and other territories, and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Empire surrendered to the Allies on August 15, 1945.

Little Boy

Hiroshima bombatomic bombfirst atomic bomb
On August 6, one of the modified B-29s dropped a uranium gun-type bomb ("Little Boy") on Hiroshima. Little Boy was a gun-type fission weapon that used uranium-235, a rare isotope of uranium separated at the Clinton Engineer Works at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
The Hiroshima bombing was the second man-made nuclear explosion in history, after the Trinity test.

Surrender of Japan

Japanese surrenderJapan's surrenderJapan surrendered
Japan surrendered to the Allies on August 15, six days after the Soviet Union's declaration of war and the bombing of Nagasaki.
On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM local time, the United States detonated an atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima.

Philippines campaign (1944–1945)

Philippines campaignPhilippines Campaign (1944–45)Philippines
In the Pacific, the Allies returned to the Philippines, recaptured Burma, and invaded Borneo.
United States and Philippine Commonwealth military forces were progressing in liberating territory and islands when the Japanese forces in the Philippines were ordered to surrender by Tokyo on August 15, 1945, after the dropping of the atomic bombs on mainland Japan and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria.

Silverplate

nuclear-capableits fifteen B-29Operation Silverplate
By August 1945, the Allies' Manhattan Project had produced two types of atomic bombs, and the 509th Composite Group of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was equipped with the specialized Silverplate version of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress that could deliver them from Tinian in the Mariana Islands.
This batch included the aircraft which were used in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.

Soviet–Japanese War

declared war on JapanSoviet-Japanese WarSoviet–Japanese War (1945)
Japan surrendered to the Allies on August 15, six days after the Soviet Union's declaration of war and the bombing of Nagasaki.
The commencement of the invasion fell between the US atomic bombings of Hiroshima on August 6 and Nagasaki on August 9.

Operation Downfall

invasion of JapanOperation OlympicAllied invasion
In the final year of World War II, the Allies prepared for a very costly invasion of the Japanese mainland.
The planned operation was canceled when Japan surrendered following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Soviet declaration of war and the invasion of Manchuria.

End of World War II in Asia

end of World War IIendthe end of World War II
The Japanese government signed the instrument of surrender on September 2 in Tokyo Bay, which effectively ended World War II.
(Atomic bombing of Hiroshima)

Strategic bombing during World War II

strategic bombing campaignstrategic bombingstrategic bombing campaign against Germany
Like most strategic bombing during World War II, the aim of the air offensive against Japan was to destroy the enemy's war industries, kill or disable civilian employees of these industries, and undermine civilian morale.
The US air raids on Japan began in earnest in October 1944 and by March 1945 had started their escalation into widespread firebombing, which culminated in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 and 9 August 1945, respectively.

Eighth United States Army

Eighth ArmyU.S. Eighth Army8th Army
Operation Olympic was to be followed in March 1946 by Operation Coronet, the capture of the Kantō Plain, near Tokyo on the main Japanese island of Honshū by the U.S. First, Eighth and Tenth Armies, as well as a Commonwealth Corps made up of Australian, British and Canadian divisions.
However, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancelled the invasion, and the Eighth Army found itself in charge of occupying it peacefully.

J. Robert Oppenheimer

Robert OppenheimerOppenheimerRobert J. Oppenheimer
Groves appointed J. Robert Oppenheimer to organize and head the project's Los Alamos Laboratory in New Mexico, where bomb design work was carried out.
In August 1945, the weapons were used in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Clinton Engineer Works

Clinton Engineering WorksCEWClinton Laboratories
Little Boy was a gun-type fission weapon that used uranium-235, a rare isotope of uranium separated at the Clinton Engineer Works at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
The Clinton Engineer Works (CEW) was the production installation of the Manhattan Project that during World War II produced the enriched uranium used in the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima, as well as the first examples of reactor-produced plutonium.

Henry L. Stimson

Henry StimsonHenry Lewis StimsonStimson
Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson was sufficiently concerned about high American estimates of probable casualties to commission his own study by Quincy Wright and William Shockley.
He supported the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Japanese nuclear weapon program

Japanese atomic programJapanese nuclear weapons programdevelop usable nuclear weapons
There was a Japanese nuclear weapon program, but it lacked the human, mineral and financial resources of the Manhattan Project, and never made much progress towards developing an atomic bomb.
Like the German nuclear weapons program, it suffered from an array of problems, and was ultimately unable to progress beyond the laboratory stage before the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender in August 1945.