Attitude (psychology)

attitudeattitudessocial attitudeABC model of attitudesattitude component modelAttitude measurementattitude researchersattitude typesattitude;Attitudes formation and change
In psychology, attitude is a psychological construct, a mental and emotional entity that inheres in, or characterizes a person.wikipedia
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Attitude change

attitudechange
Key topics in the study of attitudes include attitude strength, attitude change, consumer behavior, and attitude-behavior relationships. Emotion is a common component in persuasion, social influence, and attitude change.
Attitudes are associated beliefs and behaviors towards some object.

Ambivalence

ambivalentambivalent emotionsambivalently
Most contemporary perspectives on attitudes permit that people can also be conflicted or ambivalent toward an object by simultaneously holding both positive and negative attitudes toward the same object.
Stated another way, ambivalence is the experience of having an attitude towards someone or something that contains both positively and negatively valenced components.

Social psychology

social psychologistsocialsocial psychological
Prominent psychologist Gordon Allport described this latent psychological construct as "the most distinctive and indispensable concept in contemporary social psychology."
Attitudes and small group phenomena were the most commonly studied topics in this era.

Psychological Types

psychological typeJungian typologypersonality theories of Carl Jung
Attitude is one of Jung's 57 definitions in Chapter XI of Psychological Types.
The functions are modified by two main attitude types: extraversion and introversion.

Psychology

psychologicalpsychologistpsychologists
In psychology, attitude is a psychological construct, a mental and emotional entity that inheres in, or characterizes a person.
Social psychologists study such topics as the influence of others on an individual's behavior (e.g. conformity, persuasion), and the formation of beliefs, attitudes, and stereotypes about other people.

Group polarization

Attitude polarizationrisky shiftpolarization
Persuasion theories says that in politics, successful persuaders convince its message recipients into a selective perception or attitude polarization for turning against the opposite candidate through a repetitive process that they are in a noncommittal state and it is unacceptable and doesn't have any moral basis for it and for this they only require to chain the persuading message into a realm of plausibility (Gopnik, 2015 & O’Keefe, 2016).
The phenomenon also holds that a group's attitude toward a situation may change in the sense that the individuals' initial attitudes have strengthened and intensified after group discussion, a phenomenon known as attitude polarization.

Consumer behaviour

consumer behaviorConsumer psychologycustomer behavior
Key topics in the study of attitudes include attitude strength, attitude change, consumer behavior, and attitude-behavior relationships.
Psychological factors include an individual's motivation, attitudes, personal values and beliefs.

Jung's theory of neurosis

neurosis
Jung's theory of neurosis is based on the premise of a self-regulating psyche composed of tensions between opposing attitudes of the ego and the unconscious.

Affect (psychology)

affectaffectiveaffects
Though it is sometimes common to define an attitude as affect toward an object, affect (i.e., discrete emotions or overall arousal) is generally understood as an evaluative structure used to form attitude object.
Specific research has been done on preferences, attitudes, impression formation, and decision making.

Functional Attitude Theory

This functional attitude theory suggests that in order for attitudes to change (e.g., via persuasion), appeals must be made to the function(s) that a particular attitude serves for the individual.
Functional attitude theory (FAT) suggests that beliefs and attitudes are influential to various psychological functions.

Persuasion

persuasivepersuadepersuaded
This functional attitude theory suggests that in order for attitudes to change (e.g., via persuasion), appeals must be made to the function(s) that a particular attitude serves for the individual. Emotion is a common component in persuasion, social influence, and attitude change.
Persuasion can attempt to influence a person's beliefs, attitudes, intentions, motivations, or behaviors.

Self-concept

self-identityself-identificationego
By appealing to that individual's image of themselves as tolerant and open-minded, it may be possible to change their prejudicial attitudes to be more consistent with their self-concept.
Self-concept is distinguishable from self-awareness, which refers to the extent to which self-knowledge is defined, consistent, and currently applicable to one's attitudes and dispositions.

Personality psychology

personalitypersonalitiespersonality theory
Unlike personality, attitudes are expected to change as a function of experience.
Personality also refers to the pattern of thoughts, feelings, social adjustments, and behaviors consistently exhibited over time that strongly influences one's expectations, self-perceptions, values, and attitudes.

Value (ethics)

valuesvaluevalue system
It is an individual's predisposed state of mind regarding a value and it is precipitated through a responsive expression towards a person, place, thing, or event (the attitude object) which in turn influences the individual's thought and action.

Self-perception theory

self-perceptioninferencesperceive themselves
Other theories include balance theory, originally proposed by Heider (1958), and the self-perception theory, originally proposed by Daryl Bem.
Self-perception theory (SPT) is an account of attitude formation developed by psychologist Daryl Bem.

Attitude object

It is an individual's predisposed state of mind regarding a value and it is precipitated through a responsive expression towards a person, place, thing, or event (the attitude object) which in turn influences the individual's thought and action.
Attitude (psychology)

Daryl Bem

Daryl J. BemFeeling the Future controversyBem Experiments
Other theories include balance theory, originally proposed by Heider (1958), and the self-perception theory, originally proposed by Daryl Bem.
He is the originator of the self-perception theory of attitude formation and change.

Social influence

influenceinfluencingimpact
Emotion is a common component in persuasion, social influence, and attitude change.
Technically, compliance is a change in behavior but not necessarily in attitude; one can comply due to mere obedience or by otherwise opting to withhold private thoughts due to social pressures.

Balance theory

cognitive balanceBalanceHeider balance theory
Other theories include balance theory, originally proposed by Heider (1958), and the self-perception theory, originally proposed by Daryl Bem.
Balance theory is useful in examining how celebrity endorsement affects consumers' attitudes toward products.

Russell H. Fazio

FazioRussell Fazio
The MODE model was developed by Fazio.
Fazio’s work focuses on social psychological phenomena like attitude formation and change, the relationship between attitudes and behavior, and the automatic and controlled cognitive processes that guide social behavior.

Implicit attitude

Implicit attitudesAffect misattribution procedureimplicit
Research on implicit attitudes, which are generally unacknowledged or outside of awareness, uses sophisticated methods involving people's response times to stimuli to show that implicit attitudes exist (perhaps in tandem with explicit attitudes of the same object).
The commonly used definition of implicit attitude within cognitive and social psychology comes from Anthony Greenwald and Mahzarin Banaji's template for definitions of terms related to implicit cognition (see also implicit stereotype and implicit self-esteem for usage of this template): "Implicit attitudes are introspectively unidentified (or inaccurately identified) traces of past experience that mediate favorable or unfavorable feeling, thought, or action toward social objects".

Cognition

cognitivecognitive functioncognitive process
In psychology, the term "cognition" is usually used within an information processing view of an individual's psychological functions (see cognitivism), and it is the same in cognitive engineering; in a branch of social psychology called social cognition, the term is used to explain attitudes, attribution, and group dynamics.

Implicit-association test

Implicit Association TestimplicitProject Implicit
For example, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) examines the strength between the target concept and an attribute element by considering the latency in which a person can examine two response keys when each has two meanings.
These processes may include memory, perception, attitudes, self-esteem, and stereotypes.

Emotion

emotionsemotionalemotional state
In psychology, attitude is a psychological construct, a mental and emotional entity that inheres in, or characterizes a person.

Gordon Allport

Gordon W. AllportAllportBecoming
Prominent psychologist Gordon Allport described this latent psychological construct as "the most distinctive and indispensable concept in contemporary social psychology."