Attitude Era

The Attitude EraWWF AttitudeAttitude90s wrestling boomA change in creative directionan edgier, more hostile attitudearmedAttitude" marketing campaignboom of mainstream professional wrestlingfor the tone of WWF programming for the next several years
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.wikipedia
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Monday Night Wars

Monday Night Warratings war1990s wrestling boom
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.
Throughout the late 1990s, the WWF began to rise in popularity after it rebranded itself as a more adult-themed, sexualized and violent product, a period in the company's history now referred to as the Attitude Era.

Dwayne Johnson

The RockDwayne "The Rock" JohnsonRocky Maivia
The Attitude Era marked the rise of many WWF male singles wrestlers, including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Mick Foley (in various personas), The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle and Kane.
He subsequently won his first WWF Championship in 1998 and helped usher the WWF into the "Attitude Era", a boom period in the company's business in the latter 1990s and early 2000s which still hold professional wrestling records for television ratings.

Stone Cold Steve Austin

Steve AustinStone Cold" Steve AustinStunning" Steve Austin
The Attitude Era marked the rise of many WWF male singles wrestlers, including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Mick Foley (in various personas), The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle and Kane.
This persona of Austin's became the "poster boy" of the Attitude Era, a boom period in WWF business in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

The Undertaker

Mark CalawayUndertakerMean" Mark Callous
The Attitude Era marked the rise of many WWF male singles wrestlers, including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Mick Foley (in various personas), The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle and Kane.
The Undertaker became one of the most prominent figures of the Attitude Era, featuring in various pivotal storylines and matches as WWF sustained a boom period in business in the late 1990s.

WCW Monday Nitro

Monday NitroNitroMonday Night Nitro
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.
Beginning in June 1996, Nitro beat Raw in the ratings for 83 consecutive weeks, forcing WWF owner Vince McMahon to usher in the more adult-oriented "Attitude Era".

Triple H

Hunter Hearst HelmsleyPaul "Triple H" LevesquePaul Levesque
The Attitude Era marked the rise of many WWF male singles wrestlers, including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Mick Foley (in various personas), The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle and Kane.
In WWF, Triple H gained industry fame after co-founding the influential D-Generation X stable, which became a major element of the "Attitude Era" in the 1990s.

Kane (wrestler)

KaneGlenn JacobsIsaac Yankem
The Attitude Era marked the rise of many WWF male singles wrestlers, including Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, Mick Foley (in various personas), The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle and Kane.
Following his debut, Kane remained a pivotal component of the WWF's "Attitude Era" of the late 1990s and early 2000s, defeating the era's "poster boy" Stone Cold Steve Austin for the WWF Championship in his first pay-per-view (PPV) main event at King of the Ring in June 1998.

WWE

World Wrestling FederationWorld Wrestling EntertainmentWWF
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.
As the Monday Night Wars continued between Raw Is War and WCW's Nitro, the WWF would transform itself from a family-friendly product into a more adult oriented product, known as the Attitude Era.

D-Generation X

DXandD-Generation-X
Distinguished stables established in this era, such as D-Generation X, The Nation of Domination, The Corporation, The Ministry of Darkness, The Corporate Ministry and The Brood among others developed major rivalries among each other.
The group originated in the midst of the WWF's "Attitude Era" in 1997 as a foil to another prominent faction, The Hart Foundation.

Brian Pillman

Flyin' BrianFlyin'" Brian PillmanPillman's got a gun
Brian Pillman's "loose cannon" persona and the "Pillman's got a gun" segment from 1996 when he pulled a gun on Austin, has also been credited.
By the end of his career he worked with his long-time friend and former teammate Stone Cold Steve Austin in a storyline involving a firearm and with The Hart Foundation during the first instances of the developing Attitude Era.

WrestleMania XIV

WrestleMania 14XIV
They have also said that King of the Ring 1996, and WrestleMania XIV on March 29, 1998, were the starting point.
His victory in the main event, against Shawn Michaels (who performed despite a severe injury and would not compete again until SummerSlam in 2002), has been cited as the beginning of the Attitude Era (given further proof by the fact that this was the final WWF event to use the "New Generation" logo).

WWE Raw

RawMonday Night RawRaw is War
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.
After WrestleMania XIV in March 1998, the WWF regained the lead in the Monday Night Wars with its new "WWF Attitude" brand.

World Championship Wrestling

WCWWCW World Championship WrestlingUniversal Wrestling Corporation
Attitude Era is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE, then known as World Wrestling Federation or WWF), to describe the company's programming during the Monday Night Wars, a period in which WWF's Monday Night Raw went head-to-head with World Championship Wrestling's (WCW) Monday Nitro in a battle for Nielsen ratings each week during the late 1990s.
WCW dominated pro wrestling's television ratings from mid-1996 to 1998 in the U.S. (i.e., for 84 straight weeks) mainly due to its incredibly popular New World Order storyline; but thereafter, began to lose heavy ground to the WWF, which had successfully rebounded from the WCW threat with its edgy, antihero-driven "Attitude" era that ironically saw the rise of former WCW workers as WWF superstars such as Stone Cold Steve Austin, Triple H, Mick Foley and Chris Jericho, as well as fresh, young talent including The Rock.

Vince Russo

Sports Entertainment XtremeThe BrandVincent Russo
The creative side of the product during the early stages of the era was spearheaded by Chairman Vince McMahon and head writer Vince Russo, who drastically changed the way professional wrestling television was written.
With the angles that he created, Russo had a large hand in putting WWF ahead of WCW in the Monday night rating wars during the Attitude Era.

Montreal Screwjob

called for the bellcontroversial circumstancescontroversial fashion
Their rivalry culminated in the Montreal Screwjob, one of the most critical points in the birth of Vince McMahon's character, Mr. McMahon, a corrupt evil-owner caricature fixated on destroying the lives of disobedient employees.
The far-reaching impact of the incident led to its adoption as a theme in matches and storylines of the WWF's "Attitude Era" and the creation of the character of "Mr. McMahon," the evil boss.

WrestleMania 13

13
Austin's popularity gradually started to rise as an anti-hero despite his playing a heel character, eventually leading to a long feud with Hart from late-1996 to mid-1997 climaxing in a Submission Match at WrestleMania 13.
However, the submission match between Bret Hart and Stone Cold Steve Austin was highly praised, being called one of the greatest matches in wrestling history, and has been cited by some as the beginning of the Attitude Era.

King of the Ring (1996)

King of the Ring19961996 King of the Ring
They have also said that King of the Ring 1996, and WrestleMania XIV on March 29, 1998, were the starting point.
Austin's victory speech after winning the 1996 King of the Ring tournament gave rise to the "Austin 3:16" tag line, which would go on to become one of the most popular catchphrases in the history of professional wrestling and the event has been cited by WWE as the starting point of the Attitude Era along with WrestleMania 13, Badd Blood: In Your House, Survivor Series 1997 and WrestleMania XIV.

John Layfield

John "Bradshaw" LayfieldBradshawJohn Bradshaw Layfield
Upon his return, a much scarier, darker, druid-like Undertaker introduced his Ministry of Darkness, a satanic-themed stable which consisted of The Acolytes (Faarooq and Bradshaw), Mideon, Viscera and The Brood (Edge, Christian, and Gangrel).
Layfield rose to prominence in WWE (then the World Wrestling Federation, WWF) during its Attitude Era under the ring name Bradshaw, during which time he became a three-time WWF Tag Team Champion with Ron "Farooq" Simmons as part of the Acolyte Protection Agency (APA).

Bret Hart

BretBret "Hitman" HartBret "The Hitman" Hart
After losing a steel cage match against Sycho Sid in an attempt to win back the WWF World Heavyweight Championship in March 1997, Bret "Hitman" Hart angrily shoved McMahon to the wrestling mat and went into a profanity-laced tirade.
This incident has been cited as one which helped lay the foundations of the WWF's Attitude Era, as well as the starting point of McMahon's on-air character, the tyrannical WWF owner "Mr. McMahon".

Backyard wrestling

backyard wrestlerbackyard wrestlersbackyard federation
While Mankind was his main persona in WWF and Cactus Jack was previously used in his days in WCW, Japan and independent circuits, Dude Love was inspired by a character Foley created when he and his high school friends did backyard wrestling in his home area of Long Island, New York.
Its peak years of popularity were 1996-2001, during the boom period of professional wrestling notorious as The Attitude Era, when high-risk stunts exerted a strong influence on the wrestling fan base, particularly those performed by Mick Foley.

Jim Ross

James RossJR
The image of Foley being thrown and falling 20 feet from the top of the third Hell in a Cell match by The Undertaker at the 1998 King of the Ring is synonymous with the era, along with Jim Ross' commentary of "as God is my witness, he is broken in half".
He is known affectionately as "Good ol' JR", was widely regarded as the voice of the WWE particularly during The Attitude Era, and has been labelled as one of the greatest wrestling commentators of all time.

WWE SmackDown

SmackDownSmackDown!SmackDown Live
On the very first ever episode of SmackDown!, The Undertaker joined forces with Shane McMahon, in turn gaining control of The Corporation and merging his Ministry with it to form The Corporate Ministry.
In the spirit of the WWF's Attitude Era, the show was originally planned to be two hours of WWF Divas in primetime TV.

Gillberg (wrestler)

Duane GillGillbergPain
Lita made her WWF debut as a valet for luchador Essa Rios on the February 13, 2000 episode of Sunday Night Heat, where Rios was booked to win the WWF Light Heavyweight Championship from Gillberg.
Duane Gill (born July 10, 1959) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) during the Attitude Era under the ring name Gillberg, a parody of then-rival promotion World Championship Wrestling's top star Goldberg.

Chyna

Joanie LaurerJoanie "Chyna" LaurerChyna (Joanie Laurer)
While most of the company's female talent such as Sable, Sunny and later Trish Stratus and Stacy Keibler during this time period were marketed as sex symbols and often booked in sexually provocative gimmick matches (for example "bra and panty" matches, bikini matches, etc) in an effort to draw more male viewership, prominent female stars such as Chyna, Lita, Ivory, and Jacqueline among others were presented as legitimate wrestlers in legitimate wrestling matches.
Numerous commentators have credited Chyna as being influential to women's wrestling and one of the biggest stars of WWE's Attitude Era.

Professional wrestling

professional wrestlerprofessional wrestlerswrestling
The following week on April 13, 1998, Austin and McMahon were going to battle out their differences in an actual match, but the match was declared a no contest when Mick Foley (as Dude Love) interrupted the entire contest.
He, along with the stable of D-Generation X, is generally credited with ushering in the Attitude Era of WWF programming.