A report on Auckland

Print of a painting of Auckland port, 1857
Queen Street (c.1889); painting by Jacques Carabain. Most of the buildings depicted were demolished during rampant modernisation in the 1970s.
Looking east over the area that became Wynyard Quarter with the Auckland CBD in the middle distance, c. 1950s.
The urbanised extent of Auckland (red),
Satellite view of the Auckland isthmus and Waitematā Harbour
A view over Chelsea Sugar Refinery's lower dam towards Auckland Harbour Bridge and the CBD
The volcanic Rangitoto Island in the Hauraki Gulf, with the remnant of Takaroro / Mount Cambria in the foreground (yellow, grassy reserve) . Viewed from Takarunga / Mount Victoria over Devonport.
Asians are Auckland's fastest growing ethnic group. Here, lion dancers perform at the Auckland Lantern Festival.
St Matthew-in-the-City, a historic Anglican church in the Auckland CBD
Projection of the Auckland Region's population growth to 2031
Pedestrians on Vulcan Lane in the CBD
The modern section of the Auckland Art Gallery, completed in 2011
Albert Park in central Auckland
View from the top of Maungawhau / Mount Eden
Landmark House
The twin towers of the National Bank Centre are among the tallest buildings in Auckland
Terraced housing built in 1897 as residential buildings and associated place houses for John Endean
Auckland Town Hall entrance on Queen Street
Old Government House, former residence of the Governor
The University of Auckland clock tower building is a 'Category I' historic place, completed in 1926
Railway lines serve the western, southern and eastern parts of the city from the Britomart Transport Centre.
Aerial view of the Auckland Harbour Bridge
The Auckland CBD skyline and Harbour Bridge at sunset.
The International Terminal at Auckland International Airport
Otahuhu Power Station's 404MW combined cycle turbine, also known as Otahuhu B

Large metropolitan city in the North Island of New Zealand.

- Auckland

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Location of Mangere Inlet (circled)

Māngere Inlet

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Location of Mangere Inlet (circled)
Aerial view of Māngere Inlet (2009).
A look over the inlet to the south, near the western end.

Mangere Inlet is an arm of the Manukau Harbour, the southwestern of the two harbours of Auckland, New Zealand and itself an arm of the Tasman Sea.

Riverhead Forest

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View of the Riverhead Forest looking south towards Auckland
Recently felled section of the Riverhead Forest
Trail runners competing in the XTerra Trail Run Series in 2009
Remains of the Riverhead Forest mill

Riverhead Forest is a state owned forest to the north-west of Auckland, New Zealand.

Okiato

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Small town in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand, 7 km south of present-day Russell.

Small town in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand, 7 km south of present-day Russell.

Car ferry between Opua and Okiato (with Opua in the distance)
Plan of Russell (Okiato)

It was founded in 1840 and served as New Zealand's first national capital until 1841, when the seat of government was moved to Auckland.

Terraces on Maungawhau / Mount Eden, marking the sites of the defensive palisades and ditches of this former pā

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The word pā (often spelled pa in English) can refer to any Māori village or defensive settlement, but often refers to hillforts – fortified settlements with palisades and defensive terraces – and also to fortified villages.

The word pā (often spelled pa in English) can refer to any Māori village or defensive settlement, but often refers to hillforts – fortified settlements with palisades and defensive terraces – and also to fortified villages.

Terraces on Maungawhau / Mount Eden, marking the sites of the defensive palisades and ditches of this former pā
Pūtiki pā on the Whanganui River in 1850
Model of a pā on a headland, showing the stepped nature and the wood palisades.
Some 19th-century (gunfighter) pā built specifically for defense against gunpowder weapons sometimes even provided overlapping fields of fire for the defenders.
An 1863 meeting between Māori and settlers in a pā whakairo (carved pā) in Hawke's Bay Province.
This view of Huriawa Peninsula shows how Māori often chose nearly impregnable natural landforms as pā sites.

Dormant volcanoes were commonly used for pā in the area of present-day Auckland.

The bridge from the north.

Upper Harbour Bridge

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The bridge from the north.
The bridge from the eastern (Greenhithe) end, with the walking / cycling paths and a memorial stone visible.

The Upper Harbour Bridge (also called the Greenhithe Bridge) is a motorway bridge in west Auckland, New Zealand.

Myers Free Kindergarten building in Myers Park.

Myers Park, Auckland

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Myers Free Kindergarten building in Myers Park.
Crowd alongside Myers Kindergarten, around 1917.

Myers Park is a narrow park in central Auckland, New Zealand, running parallel to the upper part of Queen Street.

The central lava dome, or tholoid.

Māngere Mountain

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The central lava dome, or tholoid.
Pahoehoe lava flow from Mangere Mountain at nearby Ambury Regional Park
One of many small lava caves in lava flows from Mangere Mountain, at Ambury Regional Park

Māngere Mountain is a volcanic cone in Māngere, Auckland.

Blues (Super Rugby)

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The team's logo from 1997–2000, when the team dropped the Auckland prefix from its official name.
Blues playing against the Crusaders in Eden Park in 2008

The Blues (known as the Auckland Blues from 1996 to 2000) is a New Zealand professional rugby union team based in Auckland, New Zealand who play in the Super Rugby competition.

Population pyramid taken from the 2013 census

Demographics of New Zealand

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The demographics of New Zealand encompass the gender, ethnic, religious, geographic, and economic backgrounds of the 5 million people living in New Zealand.

The demographics of New Zealand encompass the gender, ethnic, religious, geographic, and economic backgrounds of the 5 million people living in New Zealand.

Population pyramid taken from the 2013 census
Population pyramid of New Zealand in 2022
National population projection from 1948 to 2068 using 2016 as the base year. Data before 2016 are historical estimates, beyond 2016 are projections with confidence intervals.
Population pyramid of New Zealand in 2022
Change in population by region in New Zealand based on the 2006–2013 censuses
Population density as of the 2006 census
New Zealand's fastest growing ethnic groups are Asian. Here, lion dancers perform at the Auckland Lantern Festival.
European{{legend|#f7fbff|Less than 5%}}{{legend|#e3eef8|More than 5%}}{{legend|#d1e2f2|More than 10%}}{{legend|#b9d5ea|More than 20%}}{{legend|#9ac7e0|More than 30%}}{{legend|#72b2d7|More than 40%}}{{legend|#519ccc|More than 50%}}{{legend|#3585bf|More than 60%}}{{legend|#1c6bb0|More than 70%}}{{legend|#08519c|More than 80%}}{{legend|#08306b|More than 90%}}
Māori{{legend|#fff5f0|Less than 5%}}{{legend|#fee3d6|More than 5%}}{{legend|#fcc5af|More than 10%}}{{legend|#fca386|More than 20%}}{{legend|#fb8161|More than 30%}}{{legend|#f75d41|More than 40%}}{{legend|#ea362a|More than 50%}}{{legend|#cb181d|More than 60%}}{{legend|#a80f15|More than 70%}}{{legend|#67000d|More than 80%}}
Asian{{legend|#f7fcf5|Less than 5%}}{{legend|#e5f5e0|More than 5%}}{{legend|#c9e9c2|More than 10%}}{{legend|#a5da9f|More than 20%}}{{legend|#7ac77b|More than 30%}}{{legend|#4aaf61|More than 40%}}{{legend|#29924a|More than 50%}}{{legend|#077331|More than 60%}}{{legend|#00441b|More than 70%}}
Pacific Islander{{legend|#f1eef6|Less than 5%}}{{legend|#e4d1e7|More than 5%}}{{legend|#d7b5d8|More than 10%}}{{legend|#db8dc4|More than 20%}}{{legend|#df65b0|More than 30%}}{{legend|#de4093|More than 40%}}{{legend|#dd1c77|More than 50%}}{{legend|#ba0e5d|More than 60%}}{{legend|#980043|More than 70%}}
Speakers of Māori according to the 2013 census:
Less than 5%
More than 5%
More than 10%
More than 20%
More than 30%
More than 40%
More than 50%
alt=|European from 2006 to 2018
alt=|Māori in 2018
alt=|Asian in 2018
alt=|Pacific peoples in 2018

The five largest cities are Auckland (with approximately one-third of the country's population), Christchurch (in the South Island, the largest island of the New Zealand archipelago), Wellington, Hamilton, and Tauranga.

Mount Smart Stadium

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Big Day Out Double Stages, Auckland 2007
Panoramic image of Mt Smart Stadium in 2006
Aerial view of the stadium
The South Stand at Mt Smart Stadium, shot from the northern end of the stadium. Warriors Open Day, February 2005.

Mount Smart Stadium (formerly known as Ericsson Stadium) is a multipurpose stadium in Auckland, New Zealand.