Auditory hallucination

auditory hallucinationsauditoryhearing voiceshears voicesvoicesheard voicesvoices in her headauditory varietyauditory verbal hallucinationsaural
A paracusia, or auditory hallucination, is a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus.wikipedia
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Hallucination

hallucinationshallucinatehallucinating
A paracusia, or auditory hallucination, is a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus.
Hallucinations can occur in any sensory modality—visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, tactile, proprioceptive, equilibrioceptive, nociceptive, thermoceptive and chronoceptive.

Psychosis

psychoticpsychosespsychotic break
This may be associated with psychotic disorders, and holds special significance in diagnosing these conditions.
Auditory hallucinations, particularly experiences of hearing voices, are the most common and often prominent feature of psychosis.

Musical ear syndrome

Other types of auditory hallucination include exploding head syndrome and musical ear syndrome.
Musical ear syndrome (MES) describes a condition seen in people who have hearing loss and subsequently develop auditory hallucinations.

Earworm

earwormscatchyear worm
This should be distinguished from the commonly experienced phenomenon of getting a song stuck in one's head.
The phenomenon should not be confused with palinacousis, a rare medical condition caused by damage to the temporal lobe of the brain that results in auditory hallucinations.

Schizophrenia

schizophrenicschizophrenicspositive symptoms
Other symptoms may include false beliefs, unclear or confused thinking, hearing voices that do not exist, reduced social engagement and emotional expression, and lack of motivation.

Schizoaffective disorder

schizoaffectiveschizoaffective disordersschizo-affective disorder
Brian Wilson, songwriter and co-founder of the Beach Boys, has schizoaffective disorder that presents itself in the form of disembodied voices.
Auditory hallucinations, or "hearing voices," are most common.

Exploding head syndrome

Other types of auditory hallucination include exploding head syndrome and musical ear syndrome.
Exploding head syndrome is classified under other parasomnias by the 2014 International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD, 3rd.Ed.) and is an unusual type of auditory hallucination in that it occurs in people who are not fully awake.

Brian Wilson

BrianBedroom TapesWilson
Brian Wilson, songwriter and co-founder of the Beach Boys, has schizoaffective disorder that presents itself in the form of disembodied voices.
A week after his first LSD trip, Wilson began suffering from auditory hallucinations, which have persisted throughout his life.

Internal monologue

inner monologueself-talkinner voice
This involves the capacity to carry out internal monologues, as seen in reading to oneself, or going over a list silently.
In some cases people may think of inner speech as coming from an external source, as with schizophrenic auditory hallucinations.

Microwave auditory effect

Allan H. FreyFrey effectelectrophonic effect
Numerous individuals suffering from auditory hallucinations, delusional disorders, or other mental illnesses have claimed that government agents use forms of mind control technologies based on microwave signals to transmit sounds and thoughts into their heads as a form of electronic harassment, referring to the alleged technology as "voice to skull" or "V2K".

Auditory imagery

Auditory
These areas are important to inner speech and verbal self-monitoring which may explain why schizophrenia is more likely to induce auditory hallucinations.

Tinnitus

Stimulus (physiology)

stimulistimulussensitivity
A paracusia, or auditory hallucination, is a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
However, individuals without any psychiatric disease whatsoever may hear voices.

Lesion

lesionsbrain lesionslesion studies
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Brainstem

brain stembrain-stemback of the skull
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Stroke

ischemic strokestrokescerebrovascular accident
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Sleep disorder

sleep disorderssleep disturbancesleep disturbances
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Narcolepsy

narcolepticdifficulty in controlling her sleepdifficulty staying awake
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Neoplasm

tumortumorstumour
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Abscess

abscessespustularCutaneous abscess
This can be caused by: lesions on the brain stem (often resulting from a stroke); also, sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, tumors, encephalitis, or abscesses.

Hallucinations (book)

HallucinationsHallucinations'' (book)
In his popular 2012 book Hallucinations, neurologist Oliver Sacks describes voice hearing in patients with a wide variety of medical conditions, as well as his own personal experience of hearing voices.

Oliver Sacks

Oliver SachsOliver Wolf SacksDr. Oliver Sacks
In his popular 2012 book Hallucinations, neurologist Oliver Sacks describes voice hearing in patients with a wide variety of medical conditions, as well as his own personal experience of hearing voices.