Augmentation (music)

augmentationaugmentedwideningaugmentationsaugmented 2ndaugmented intervalaugmented intervalsaugmented/diminishedaugmenting
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval.wikipedia
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Interval (music)

intervalintervalsmusical interval
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval.
The name of any interval is further qualified using the terms perfect (P), major (M), minor (m), augmented (A), and diminished (d). This is called its interval quality.

Diminution

diminishednarrowingat double the speed
A melody or series of notes is augmented if the lengths of the notes are prolonged; augmentation is thus the opposite of diminution, where note values are shortened.
A melody or series of notes is diminished if the lengths of the notes are shortened; diminution is thus the opposite of augmentation, where the notes are lengthened.

Counterpoint

contrapuntalcontrapuntallyspecies counterpoint
This technique is often used in contrapuntal music, as in the "canon by augmentation" ("per augmentationem"), in which the notes in the following voice or voices are longer than those in the leading voice, usually twice the original length.
Augmentation: When in one of the parts in imitative counterpoint the note values are extended in duration compared to the rate at which they were sounded when introduced.

Augmented fifth

augmentedfifthaugmented (fifth)
Thus an augmented fifth, for example, is a chromatic semitone wider than the perfect fifth.
In classical music from Western culture, an augmented fifth is an interval produced by widening a perfect fifth by a chromatic semitone.

Augmented unison

chromatic semitonesmaller
An interval is augmented if it is widened by a chromatic semitone.
Other sources reject the possibility or utility of the diminished unison on the grounds that any alteration to the unison increases its size, thus augmenting rather than diminishing it. Sources for augmented unison

Music

audiomusicalPop
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval.

Music theory

music theoristtheorymusical theory
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval.

Late Latin

Latinancient Latinlow Latin
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval.

Musical note

notenotesmusical notes
In Western music and music theory, augmentation (from Late Latin augmentare, to increase) is the lengthening of a note or interval. A melody or series of notes is augmented if the lengths of the notes are prolonged; augmentation is thus the opposite of diminution, where note values are shortened.

Melody

melodiesmelodiclead
Augmentation is a compositional device where a melody, theme or motif is presented in longer note-values than were previously used.

Eighth note

quavereighth noteseighth-note
A melody originally consisting of four quavers (eighth notes) for example, is augmented if it later appears with four crotchets (quarter notes) instead.

Quarter note

crotchetquarter-notecrotchets
A melody originally consisting of four quavers (eighth notes) for example, is augmented if it later appears with four crotchets (quarter notes) instead.

Canon (music)

canoncanonscanonic
This technique is often used in contrapuntal music, as in the "canon by augmentation" ("per augmentationem"), in which the notes in the following voice or voices are longer than those in the leading voice, usually twice the original length.

Johann Sebastian Bach

BachJ.S. BachJ. S. Bach
The music of Johann Sebastian Bach provides examples of this application:

Motif (music)

motifmotifsmotivic
A motif is also augmented through expanding its duration.

Duration (music)

durationdurational patterndurations
A motif is also augmented through expanding its duration.

Symphony No. 6 (Beethoven)

Symphony No. 6Pastoral SymphonySixth
Augmentation may also be found in later, non-contrapuntal pieces, such as the Pastoral Symphony (Symphony No. 6) of Beethoven, where the melodic figure first heard in the second violins at the start of the "Storm" movement ("Die Sturm"):

Ludwig van Beethoven

BeethovenBeethoven’sBeethoven, Ludwig van
Augmentation may also be found in later, non-contrapuntal pieces, such as the Pastoral Symphony (Symphony No. 6) of Beethoven, where the melodic figure first heard in the second violins at the start of the "Storm" movement ("Die Sturm"):

Musical development

developmentdevelopeddevelopment section
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Sonata form

sonata-allegro formsonata-allegrosonata
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Johannes Brahms

BrahmsBrahms, JohannesJ. Brahms
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Anton Bruckner

BrucknerBrucknerianA. Bruckner
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Leitmotif

leitmotivleitmotifsidée fixe
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Richard Wagner

WagnerWagnerianWagner’s
Examples of augmentation may be found in the development sections of sonata form movements, particularly in the symphonies of Brahms and Bruckner and in the protean leitmotifs in Wagner’s operas, which undergo all kinds of transformation as the characters change and develop through the unfolding drama.

Children's Corner

Doctor Gradus ad ParnassumGolliwogg's CakewalkChildren’s Corner
In “Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum”, the first movement of his Children’s Corner Suite, Debussy exploits augmentation in a humorous vein.