Auguste and Louis Lumière

Lumière brothersLouis LumièreLumièreLumiere BrothersAuguste LumièreLumiereLouis LumiereAntoine LumièreAuguste LumiereLumières
The Lumière brothers, Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas (19 October 1862 – 10 April 1954) and Louis Jean (5 October 1864 – 7 June 1948), were among the first filmmakers in history.wikipedia
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Lyon

Lyon, FranceLyonsLyons, France
They moved to Lyon in 1870, where son Edouard and three daughters were born.
Lyon played a significant role in the history of cinema: it is where Auguste and Louis Lumière invented the cinematograph.

La Martinière Lyon

La Martiniere LyonLa MartiniereLa Martiniere Lyons
Auguste and Louis both attended La Martiniere, the largest technical school in Lyon.
The Lumière brothers, two of the first filmmakers, attended La Martinière.

Cinematograph

Cinématographecinematographekinematograph
They patented an improved cinematograph, which in contrast to Thomas Edison's "peepshow" kinetoscope allowed simultaneous viewing by multiple parties.
It was invented in the 1890s in Lyon by Auguste and Louis Lumière.

Salon Indien du Grand Café

Salon Indien
The Lumières gave their first paid public screening on 28 December 1895, at Salon Indien du Grand Café in Paris.
It is notable for being the place that hosted the very first public film screening, on December 28, 1895, consisting in ten short clips presented by the Lumière brothers.

Film

motion picturemoviefilms
The cinématographe — a three-in-one device that could record, develop, and project motion pictures — was further developed by the Lumières. The brothers stated that "the cinema is an invention without any future" and declined to sell their camera to other filmmakers such as Georges Méliès.
The first public screenings of films at which admission was charged were made in 1895 by the American Woodville Latham and his sons, using films produced by their Eidoloscope company, and by the – arguably better known – French brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière with ten of their own productions.

Léon Gaumont

GaumontLeon GaumontChronochrome
This first screening on 22 March 1895 took place in Paris, at the "Society for the Development of the National Industry", in front of an audience of 200 people, one of whom was Léon Gaumont, then director of the company the Comptoir géneral de la photographie.
Initially, Gaumont made films for the picture arcade business such as those operated by the Lumière brothers, but it was under the direction of Alice Guy (Gaumont's secretary - First Woman Film Director), that they began making short films based on narrative scripts.

Actuality film

actualitiesactualityactuality films
Their actuality films, or actualités, are often cited as the first, primitive documentaries.
The Lumière Brothers in France were the principal advocates for this genre and also coined the term — "Actualités" — and used it as a descriptor in the printed catalogues of their films.

Documentary film

documentarydocumentariesdocumentary series
Their actuality films, or actualités, are often cited as the first, primitive documentaries.
Many of the first films, such as those made by Auguste and Louis Lumière, were a minute or less in length, due to technological limitations ( example on YouTube).

Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory

La Sortie de l'Usine Lumière à LyonSortie de l'usine Lumière de LyonLa Sortie de l'usine Lumière
This history-making presentation featured 10 short films, including their first film, Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon (Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory).
Workers Leaving The Lumière Factory in Lyon (La Sortie de l'Usine Lumière à Lyon), also known as Employees Leaving the Lumière Factory and Exiting the Factory, is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière.

L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat

Arrival of a Train at La CiotatTrain Pulling into a StationArrival of a train
The moving images had an immediate and significant influence on popular culture with L'Arrivée d'un Train en Gare de la Ciotat (literally, "the arrival of a train at La Ciotat", but more commonly known as Arrival of a Train at a Station) and Carmaux, défournage du coke (Drawing out the coke).
L'arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat (translated from French into English as The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station, Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat (US) and The Arrival of the Mail Train, and in the United Kingdom the film is known as Train Pulling into a Station) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Auguste and Louis Lumière.

Carmaux, défournage du coke

Carmaux, Drawing Out The Coke
The moving images had an immediate and significant influence on popular culture with L'Arrivée d'un Train en Gare de la Ciotat (literally, "the arrival of a train at La Ciotat", but more commonly known as Arrival of a Train at a Station) and Carmaux, défournage du coke (Drawing out the coke).
Carmaux, défournage du coke (translated as Drawing Out the coke) is a film made in 1896 by Lumière.

Kinetoscope

KinetographKinetophonepeephole viewing of motion picture devices
They patented an improved cinematograph, which in contrast to Thomas Edison's "peepshow" kinetoscope allowed simultaneous viewing by multiple parties.
In the summer of 1894, it was demonstrated at 20, boulevard Poissonnière in Paris; this was one of the primary inspirations to the Lumière brothers, who would go on to develop the first commercially successful movie projection system.

L'Arroseur Arrosé

The Sprinkler SprinkledWatering the Gardener
They also made the first steps towards comedy film with the slapstick of L'Arroseur Arrosé.
L'Arroseur Arrosé (also known as The Waterer Watered and The Sprinkler Sprinkled) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent comedy film directed and produced by Louis Lumière and starring François Clerc and Benoît Duval.

Besançon

BesanconBesançon, FranceVesontio
The Lumière brothers were born in Besançon, France, to Charles-Antoine Lumière (1840–1911) and Jeanne Joséphine Costille Lumière, who were married in 1861 and moved to Besançon, setting up a small photographic portrait studio where Auguste and Louis were born.

Autochrome Lumière

autochromeautochromesAutochrome Lumiere
In 1903 they patented a colour photographic process, the Autochrome Lumière, which was launched on the market in 1907.
The Autochrome Lumière is an early color photography process patented in 1903 by the Lumière brothers in France and first marketed in 1907.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Lumière brothers were born in Besançon, France, to Charles-Antoine Lumière (1840–1911) and Jeanne Joséphine Costille Lumière, who were married in 1861 and moved to Besançon, setting up a small photographic portrait studio where Auguste and Louis were born.
France has historical and strong links with cinema, with two Frenchmen, Auguste and Louis Lumière (known as the Lumière Brothers) credited with creating cinema in 1895.

Georges Méliès

George MélièsGeorges MeliesMéliès
The brothers stated that "the cinema is an invention without any future" and declined to sell their camera to other filmmakers such as Georges Méliès.
On 28 December 1895, Méliès attended a special private demonstration of the Lumière brothers' cinematograph, given for owners of Parisian houses of spectacle.

The Photographical Congress Arrives in Lyon

Le Débarquement du Congrès de Photographie à LyonNeuville-sur-Saône: Débarquement du congrès des photographes à Lyon
The Photographical Congress Arrives in Lyon (also known as Neuville-sur-Saône: Débarquement du congrès des photographie à Lyon) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière and starring P.J.C. Janssen as himself.

La Voltige

La Voltige (also known as Horse Trick Riders) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière.

Louis Le Prince

Louis Aimé Augustin Le PrinceTraffic Crossing Leeds Bridge
Louis Le Prince and Claude Mechant had been shooting moving picture sequences on paper film as soon as 1888, but had never performed a public demonstration.
This work may have been slightly in advance of the inventions of contemporaneous moving-picture pioneers such as William Friese-Greene and Wordsworth Donisthorpe, and years in advance of that of Auguste and Louis Lumière, and William Kennedy Dickson (who did the moving image work for Thomas Edison).

Les Forgerons

The BlacksmithsUn taller de herrería
Les Forgerons (also known as The Blacksmiths) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière.

Théâtre Optique

Pantomimes LumineusesTheatre Optique
Since 1892, the projected drawings of Émile Reynaud's Théâtre Optique were attracting Paris crowds to the Musée Grévin.
Reynaud's Théâtre Optique predated Auguste and Louis Lumière's first commercial, public screening of the cinematograph on 28 December 1895, which has long been seen as the birth of film.

Repas de bébé

Feeding the BabyThe Baby's Meal
Le Repas de Bébé (also known as Baby's Dinner and Feeding the Baby) is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière and starring Andrée Lumière.

Charles-Émile Reynaud

Émile ReynaudEmile Reynaud
Since 1892, the projected drawings of Émile Reynaud's Théâtre Optique were attracting Paris crowds to the Musée Grévin. They patented several significant processes leading up to their film camera, most notably film perforations (originally implemented by Emile Reynaud) as a means of advancing the film through the camera and projector.
The performances predated Auguste and Louis Lumière's first paid public screening of the cinematographe on 26 December 1895, often seen as the birth of cinema.

La Pêche aux poissons rouges

Fishing For Goldfish
Pêche aux poissons rouges is an 1895 French short black-and-white silent documentary film directed and produced by Louis Lumière.