Augusto César Sandino

Augusto SandinoSandinoSandinistaAugusto C. SandinoSandinistasCésar SandinoSandino RebellionSandino rebelsAugusto '''SandinoAugusto Cesar Sandino
Augusto C. Sandino (May 18, 1895 – February 21, 1934), full name Augusto Nicolás Calderón de Sandino y José de María Sandino, was a Nicaraguan revolutionary and leader of a rebellion between 1927 and 1933 against the U.S. military occupation of Nicaragua.wikipedia
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Somoza family

SomozaSomoza regimeSomoza dynasty
After being elected president by an overwhelming margin in 1936, Somoza García resumed control of the National Guard and established a dictatorship and Somoza family dynasty that ruled Nicaragua for more than 40 years.
Anastasio Somoza García assumed the presidency after luring rebel leader Augusto César Sandino to peace talks, and murdering Sandino soon afterwards.

Anastasio Somoza García

Anastasio SomozaSomozaAnastasio Somoza Garcia
Sandino was assassinated in 1934 by National Guard forces of General Anastasio Somoza García, who went on to seize power in a coup d'état two years later.
After waging a bitter, six-year struggle with the forces of General Augusto Sandino, in January 1933, the Marines evacuated the country following the election of Juan Bautista Sacasa as President.

Nicaraguan Civil War (1926–27)

civil warConstitutionalist WarNicaraguan civil war
Shortly after Sandino returned to Nicaragua, the Constitutionalist War began when Liberal soldiers in the Caribbean port of Puerto Cabezas revolted against the Conservative President Adolfo Díaz, who had recently been installed after a coup with United States involvement.
Although the civil war came to an end, one Liberal general, Augusto César Sandino, refused to lay down his arms and waged the Sandino Rebellion against the Nicaraguan government and the United States Marine Corps until 1933.

Jinotega

Jinotega, JinotegaJinotega, Nicaragua
General Benjamín Zeledón of La Concordia in the state of Jinotega died that year on 4 October during the Battle of Coyotepe Hill, when United States Marines recaptured Fort Coyotepe and the city of Masaya from rebels. During this period, Sandino married Blanca Aráuz, a young telegraphist of the village of San Rafael del Norte, Jinotega.
The most intense battles took place in the Department of Jinotega between 1927 and 1934 under Augusto C. Sandino and his troops (popularly known as "los bandoleros") against the American occupation troops.

National Guard (Nicaragua)

National GuardNicaraguan National GuardGuardia Nacional
Under the terms of the accord, both sides agreed to disarm, Díaz would be allowed to finish his term, and a new national army would be established, to be called the Guardia Nacional (National Guard). On July 27, Sandino's followers attacked a patrol of U.S. Marines and the Nicaraguan Guardia Nacional was sent to apprehend him at the village of Ocotal.
After the departure of U.S. troops in 1933 (at the height of the Great Depression), the Sacasa government opened negotiations with the National Sovereignty Defense Army (EDSN) rebel guerrilla faction led by Augusto César Sandino, which had fought both the National Guard and the U.S. occupation forces.

Sandinista National Liberation Front

SandinistaSandinistasFSLN
Sandino's political legacy was claimed by the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which finally overthrew the Somoza government in 1979. His picture and silhouette, complete with the oversized cowboy hat, were adopted as recognized symbols of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, founded in 1961 by Carlos Fonseca and Tomás Borge, among others, and later led by Daniel Ortega.
The party is named after Augusto César Sandino, who led the Nicaraguan resistance against the United States occupation of Nicaragua in the 1930s.

Battle of Ocotal

a battleattackedfirst battle of his rebellion
On July 27, Sandino's followers attacked a patrol of U.S. Marines and the Nicaraguan Guardia Nacional was sent to apprehend him at the village of Ocotal.
A large force of rebels loyal to Augusto César Sandino attacked the garrison of Ocotal, which was held by a small group of US Marines and Nicaraguan National Guards.

Niquinohomo

Niquinomo
Augusto Calderón Sandino was born May 18, 1895, in Niquinohomo, Masaya Department, Nicaragua.
It is home to the oldest extant church in Nicaragua, as well as the birthplace of Augusto César Sandino, after whom the Sandinista movement was named.

Juan Bautista Sacasa

Juan Bautista Sacasa SacasaDr. Juan B. SacasaLiberal rebels
The United States troops withdrew from the country in 1933 after overseeing the election and inauguration of President Juan Bautista Sacasa, who had returned from exile. The leader of this revolt, General José María Moncada, declared that he supported the claim of the exiled Liberal vice-president Juan Bautista Sacasa.
Over the next six years, a formerly obscure Liberal general named Augusto Sandino would lead a guerilla war against the Marines, who had remained in the country to enforce the agreement.

Adolfo Díaz

Adolfo DiazAdolfo Diaz RecinosConservative government
Shortly after Sandino returned to Nicaragua, the Constitutionalist War began when Liberal soldiers in the Caribbean port of Puerto Cabezas revolted against the Conservative President Adolfo Díaz, who had recently been installed after a coup with United States involvement. Under the terms of the accord, both sides agreed to disarm, Díaz would be allowed to finish his term, and a new national army would be established, to be called the Guardia Nacional (National Guard). In July 1912, when he was 17, Sandino witnessed an intervention of United States troops in Nicaragua to suppress an uprising against President Adolfo Díaz, regarded by many as a United States puppet.
One Liberal commander, Augusto Sandino, rejected the agreement and waged a guerrilla war against the U.S. Marines, who remained in the country to prop up Díaz's government and enforce the Espino Negro accord.

Managua

Managua, NicaraguaManagua, ManaguaCapital of Nicaragua
In April Sandino's forces played a vital role in assisting the principal Liberal Army column, which was advancing on Managua.
Nearby is the Monument to Sandino which is a silhouette of Augusto C. Sandino, one of Nicaragua's national heroes.

United States occupation of Nicaragua

Nicaraguan CampaignOccupation of NicaraguaNicaragua
Augusto C. Sandino (May 18, 1895 – February 21, 1934), full name Augusto Nicolás Calderón de Sandino y José de María Sandino, was a Nicaraguan revolutionary and leader of a rebellion between 1927 and 1933 against the U.S. military occupation of Nicaragua.
However, the Liberal commander Augusto César Sandino, and 200 of his men refused to give up the revolution.

Blanca Aráuz

Blanca Aráuz Pineda
During this period, Sandino married Blanca Aráuz, a young telegraphist of the village of San Rafael del Norte, Jinotega.
In 1927, when the guerrilla leader, Augusto César Sandino came to San Rafael del Norte, during the Constitutionalist War, he established his headquarters in the telegraph office, which was directly across the street from the American marine's headquarters.

Benjamín Zeledón

Benjamin Zeledon
General Benjamín Zeledón of La Concordia in the state of Jinotega died that year on 4 October during the Battle of Coyotepe Hill, when United States Marines recaptured Fort Coyotepe and the city of Masaya from rebels.
This image greatly impacted future Nicaraguan revolutionary Augusto César Sandino.

Ocotal

Nueva SegoviaOcotal, Nueva Segovia
On July 27, Sandino's followers attacked a patrol of U.S. Marines and the Nicaraguan Guardia Nacional was sent to apprehend him at the village of Ocotal.
In 1927, Ocotal suffered one of the first dive bombing attacks in history during a battle that pitted the American Marines and the Nicaraguan National Guard against Sandinista rebels.

José María Moncada

José María Moncada TapiaJosé Maria MoncadaJose Maria Moncada
The leader of this revolt, General José María Moncada, declared that he supported the claim of the exiled Liberal vice-president Juan Bautista Sacasa.
Moncada was one of the leaders, together with Juan Bautista Sacasa and Augusto César Sandino.

Froylán Turcios

Froylan TurciosFroyolan Turcios
At the beginning of his rebellion, Sandino appointed the Honduran poet, journalist and diplomat, Froylán Turcios, as his official foreign representative.
He was private secretary of guerrilla Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua, and a personal friend of Rubén Darío, Juan Ramón Molina and many other intellectuals and philosophers.

Pact of Espino Negro

Espino Negro accordPeace of Tipitapaa peace deal
On May 4, 1927, representatives from the two warring factions signed the Espino Negro accord, negotiated by Henry L. Stimson, appointed by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge as a special envoy to Nicaragua.
A rebel liberal group under the leadership of Augusto César Sandino also refused to sign the Pact of Espino Negro.

Nueva Segovia Department

Nueva SegoviaLas Segovias
By 1927 Sandino had returned to Las Segovias, where he recruited local peasants for his army and attacked government troops with increasing success.
In 1926, during the United States occupation of Nicaragua Las Segovias became the center of the guerrilla warfare led by Augusto César Sandino, who established a network of espionage agents and collaborators from the local population.

Augusto C. Sandino International Airport

Managua International AirportManagua AirportManagua
In the 1980s, they renamed Managua International Airport after him as "Augusto C. Sandino International Airport."
Augusto C. Sandino International Airport (Aeropuerto Internacional Augusto C. Sandino) or ACS is the main joint civil-military public international airport in Managua, Nicaragua named after Nicaraguan revolutionary Augusto Nicolás Sandino and located in the City's 6th ward, known locally as Distrito 6.

Tomás Borge

Tomas BorgeTomas Borge MartinezTomás Borge Martínez
His picture and silhouette, complete with the oversized cowboy hat, were adopted as recognized symbols of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, founded in 1961 by Carlos Fonseca and Tomás Borge, among others, and later led by Daniel Ortega.
His father, Tomás Borge Delgado, was one of Augusto César Sandino's deputy commanders during the United States occupation of Nicaragua, from 1926 to 1932.

Farabundo Martí

Agustín Farabundo Martí
His distrust of his former Communist associates led him to break off relations with Farabundo Martí, a Salvadoran who was formerly one of his most trusted lieutenants, and accused Martí of spying for the Communists.
In the meantime, he also worked with Nicaraguan revolutionary leader Augusto César Sandino.

Emilio Portes Gil

Emilio Portés Gil
After failing to negotiate his surrender in exchange for a withdrawal of U.S. troops, the Mexican President Emilio Portes Gil offered Sandino asylum.
He also attempted to negotiate the withdrawal of the United States troops from Nicaragua in exchange for the surrender of Nicaraguan General Augusto Sandino.

Maximato

Jefe MáximoMaximum Chief
In the political climate of the Maximato, Sandino's radicalism was unwelcome.
After a large demonstration in 1930, the Mexican Communist Party was banned; Mexico ended its support for the rebels of César Sandino in Nicaragua; strikes were no longer tolerated; and the government ceased redistributing lands among poorer peasants.

Sandino (film)

Sandino
The Chilean-Spanish biopic Sandino (1990), directed by Miguel Littin, was filmed in Nicaragua with an international cast including Joaquim de Almeida as Sandino, Kris Kristofferson, Dean Stockwell, Victoria Abril and Ángela Molina.
Sandino is a 1990 international co-production biographical film, directed by Chilean filmmaker Miguel Littin, about Nicaraguan revolutionary Augusto César Sandino.