Augustus Pugin

The Grange, Ramsgate, Thanet, Kent, England, designed by Pugin as his family home
Roman Catholic Cathedral Basilica of St. Chad in Birmingham, England
The northeast chapel of St. Giles Roman Catholic Church, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England, designed by Pugin
"Contrasted Residences for the Poor" from Pugin's ''Contrasts
Detail of east window of Jesus College Chapel, Cambridge, made by John Hardman and Co to a design by Pugin (1848–50)
Tiles designed by Pugin (c.1845–51)
The tomb of Augustus Pugin in St Augustine's Church, Ramsgate
Palace of Westminster
The Pugin Chapel in Brisbane, designed by Augustus Pugin and built between 1848 and 1850
Pugin Hall, Rampisham, Dorset. Grade I listed house designed as a rectory by Pugin, built 1846–1847.
"Big Ben" (London), completed to Pugin's design
St. Aidan's Cathedral, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford

English architect, designer, artist and critic who is principally remembered for his pioneering role in the Gothic Revival style of architecture.

- Augustus Pugin

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Sint-Petrus-en-Pauluskerk in Ostend (Belgium), built between 1899 and 1908

Gothic Revival architecture

Architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

Architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

Sint-Petrus-en-Pauluskerk in Ostend (Belgium), built between 1899 and 1908
The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Savannah (Georgia, United States)
Tom Tower, Oxford, by Sir Christopher Wren 1681–82, to match the Tudor surroundings
Strawberry Hill House, Twickenham, London; 1749 by Horace Walpole (1717–1797). "The seminal house of the Gothic Revival in England", it established the "Strawberry Hill Gothic" style
Basilica of Sainte Clotilde Sanctuary, Paris, France
The study at Abbotsford, created for Sir Walter Scott whose novels popularised the Medieval period from which the Gothic Revival drew its inspiration
Gothic façade of the Parlement de Rouen in France, built between 1499 and 1508, which later inspired neo-Gothic revival in the 19th century
Saint Clotilde Basilica completed 1857, Paris
Cologne Cathedral, finally completed in 1880 although construction began in 1248
The Canadian Parliament Buildings from the Ottawa River, built between 1859 and 1876
The Palace of Westminster (1840–1876), designed by Charles Barry & Augustus Pugin
Venetian Gothic in Baku, Azerbaijan.
Exeter College, Oxford Chapel
Carcassonne – Viollet-le-Duc restored the citadel from 1853.
Cast-iron Gothic tracery supports a bridge by Calvert Vaux, in Central Park, New York City
Trinity College, Hartford: Burges's revised, three-quadrangle, masterplan
Church of St Avila, Bodega, California
Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus in Mumbai, India
Construction of Washington National Cathedral began in 1907 and was completed in 1990.
Liverpool Cathedral, whose construction ran from 1903 to 1978
Schwerin Castle, Schwerin, Germany (1845–1857)
Schadau Castle, Thun, Switzerland (1846–1854)
Wrocław Główny railway station, Wrocław, Poland (1855–1857)
New Town Hall, Munich, Germany (1867–1905)
St Pancras railway station, London, England (1868)
Town Hall, Manchester, England (1868–1877)
City Hall, Vienna, Austria (1872–1883)
Sturdza Palace, Iași County, Romania (1880-1904)
Hungarian Parliament Building, Budapest, Hungary (1885–1904)
Tower Bridge, London, England (1886–1894)
The Neo-Manueline (Portuguese Late Gothic) Rossio Station, Lisbon, Portugal (1891)
Co-cathedral, Osijek, Croatia (1898)
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Moscow, Russia (1901–1911), an example of Brick Gothic revival
Basilica of Our Lady Immaculate, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Cathedral of Santa Ana (El Salvador)
Templo Expiatorio del Santísimo Sacramento Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Zamora, Mexico
Rockefeller College, Princeton, USA
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, USA
Centre Block of the Canadian Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, Ontario
Basilica of Our Lady of Luján, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina
The São Paulo Metropolitan Cathedral, São Paulo, Brazil
Basilica del Salvador, in Santiago, Chile
The Las Lajas Sanctuary in southern Colombia
Basílica del Voto Nacional, Quito, Ecuador
St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne, Australia
St Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, Australia
Sacred Heart Cathedral, Bendigo, Australia
St Mary's Cathedral, Sydney
Christchurch Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand
Otago Boys High School, Otago, New Zealand
Church of the Saviour, Baku, Azerbaijan
Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Pondicherry, India
Jakarta Cathedral, Indonesia
Basílica Menor de San Sebastián, Manila, Philippines
Sacred Heart Cathedral, Guangzhou, China
Government College University, Lahore, Pakistan

Proponents of the picturesque such as Thomas Carlyle and Augustus Pugin took a critical view of industrial society and portrayed pre-industrial medieval society as a golden age.

Seen from across the River Thames with Westminster Bridge in the foreground

Palace of Westminster

The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place for both the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The Palace of Westminster serves as the meeting place for both the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Seen from across the River Thames with Westminster Bridge in the foreground
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Detail from A Panoramic View of London, from the Tower of St. Margaret's Church, Westminster (1815) by Pierre Prévost, showing the Palace of Westminster. The original Westminster Bridge is at left, and the roof of Westminster Hall at centre.
A detail from John Rocque's 1746 map of London. St Stephen's Chapel, labelled "H of Comm" (House of Commons), was adjacent to Westminster Hall; the Parliament Chamber—labelled "H of L" (House of Lords)—and the Prince's Chamber were to the far south. The Court of Requests, between the two Houses, would become the new home of the Lords in 1801. At the north-east, by the river, stood Speaker's House.
J. M. W. Turner watched the fire of 1834 and painted several canvases depicting it, including The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons (1835).
Westminster Bridge and Houses of Parliament, c. 1910
The old chamber of the House of Commons was in use between 1852 and 1941, when it was destroyed by German bombs in the course of the Second World War.
UK Parliament lit up for the Queen's 90th Birthday, 2016
The Victoria Tower was the most conspicuous feature of Charles Barry's design for the New Palace of Westminster. At the time of its completion, it was the tallest secular building in the world.
The fame of the Elizabeth Tower has surpassed that of the Palace itself. The structure has largely become synonymous with Big Ben, the heaviest of the five bells it houses.
The slender form of the Central Tower, which was designed as a spire, markedly contrasts with the more massive square towers at the ends of the Palace.
Cromwell Green, outside Westminster Hall, is the site of Hamo Thornycroft's bronze statue of Oliver Cromwell, erected amid controversy in 1899.
Layout of the principal floor (north is to the right). The debating chambers of the two Houses and their ante-rooms lie on opposite sides of the Central Lobby and are part of the central spine of the Palace, which includes the suite of ceremonial rooms to the south. The Victoria Tower occupies the south-west corner and the Speaker's House takes up the north-east corner; the Elizabeth Tower is at the far north and Westminster Hall protrudes to the west.
The Sovereign prepares for the State Opening of Parliament in the Robing Room. Behind is the Chair of State.
Following the rapid decay of Maclise's first two frescoes, the rest of the Royal Gallery's walls were left unpainted.
Her Majesty Queen Victoria, supported by Justice and Clemency, by John Gibson (sculptor), Prince's Chamber, The Illustrated London News, 7 March 1857
The Sovereign's Throne and its gilded Canopy dominate the ornate Lords Chamber.
The passage of the Parliament Act 1911. Votes in both Houses of Parliament are conducted in the form of divisions.
Saint George for England by Sir Edward Poynter and Saint Patrick for Ireland by Robert Anning Bell are two of the four mosaics decorating the Central Lobby.
U.S. President Barack Obama (right) in the Members' Lobby during a tour of the Palace in May 2011. With him are, from the left: the Lord Great Chamberlain, the Marquess of Cholmondeley, holding his white staff of office; the Lord Speaker, Baroness Hayman; and the Speaker of the House of Commons, John Bercow.
The Victorian House of Commons. Its benches could sit only about two-thirds of all Members of Parliament, as is the case for the postwar rebuilt chamber.
Left to right: U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, House of Commons Speaker John Bercow and U.K. Foreign Secretary William Hague examine the despatch boxes on 25 February 2013
Westminster Hall, the oldest surviving part of Westminster Palace
Westminster Hall in the early 19th century, surmounted by its hammerbeam roof.
George IV's coronation banquet was held in Westminster Hall in 1821, the last of its kind; no such banquet has been held since.
Concrete barriers restrict access to Old Palace Yard.
The assassination of Prime Minister Spencer Perceval in 1812 in the lobby of the House of Commons
Plane Stupid activists on the roof of the Palace of Westminster
The introduction of a new Member of Parliament, 1858. Wearing hats in the House of Commons has not always been treated in the same way.

Augustus Pugin, a leading authority on Gothic architecture and style, assisted Barry and designed the interior of the Palace.

Parish church of St Nicholas, Corfe, Somerset

Benjamin Ferrey

English architect who worked mostly in the Gothic Revival.

English architect who worked mostly in the Gothic Revival.

Parish church of St Nicholas, Corfe, Somerset
Part of the Market Cross in Glastonbury
All Saints' parish church, Blackheath, built 1857–67
Parish church of St Mary Magdalene, Taunton, Somerset
Huntsham Court, Devon, built 1868–70

After grammar school, Ferrey went to London to study under Augustus Charles Pugin and alongside Pugin's son Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin.

Ramsgate Sands in 1854, by William Powell Frith

Ramsgate

Seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England.

Seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England.

Ramsgate Sands in 1854, by William Powell Frith
Photochrom of The sands, 1899
A map of Ramsgate from 1945
Ramsgate marina, location of many popular bars and pubs
Ramsgate Main Sands
Ramsgate Maritime Museum
The Hugin Viking longship in Pegwell.
St Lawrence College public school in Ramsgate

The architect A W Pugin and his sons lived in Ramsgate and built several important buildings there, including St Augustine's Church, The Grange, St Augustine's Abbey, and The Granville Hotel.

Peter Paul Pugin, with his wife Agnes Bird and two of their children, c. early 1890s

Peter Paul Pugin

English architect.

English architect.

Peter Paul Pugin, with his wife Agnes Bird and two of their children, c. early 1890s
Pugin altar at Bamber Bridge, Lancashire

He was the son of Augustus Pugin by his third wife, Jane Knill, and the half-brother of architect and designer Edward Welby Pugin.

Graham's Blythswood House, Glasgow. Home of the Lords Blythswood; it was demolished in 1935.

James Gillespie Graham

Scottish architect, prominent in the early 19th century.

Scottish architect, prominent in the early 19th century.

Graham's Blythswood House, Glasgow. Home of the Lords Blythswood; it was demolished in 1935.
James Gillespie Graham's Edinburgh townhouse, at 34 Albany Street
Tolbooth Kirk Edinburgh
The west front of Crawford Priory as it is today
Torrisdale Castle
Cambusnethan Priory
Duns Castle
19–34 Hamilton Square, Birkenhead
Ayton Castle
High Kirk, Dunoon

He is most notable for his work in the Scottish baronial style, as at Ayton Castle, and he also worked in the Gothic Revival style, in which he was heavily influenced by the work of Augustus Pugin.

High Street, Alton

Alton, Staffordshire

Village in Staffordshire, England.

Village in Staffordshire, England.

High Street, Alton

It is noted for the theme park Alton Towers, built around the site of Alton Mansion, which was owned by the Earls of Shrewsbury, and designed by Augustus Pugin.

Sanctuary of the Sacred Heart Church, Liverpool designed in the 1890s

Pugin & Pugin

Sanctuary of the Sacred Heart Church, Liverpool designed in the 1890s

Pugin & Pugin (fl. 1851–c. 1958) was a London-based family firm of church architects, founded in the Westminster office of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812–1852).

Big Ben in 2007

Big Ben

Nickname for the Great Bell of the striking clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, England, and the name is frequently extended to refer also to the clock and the clock tower.

Nickname for the Great Bell of the striking clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, England, and the name is frequently extended to refer also to the clock and the clock tower.

Big Ben in 2007
London skyline with Big Ben and environs, including the London Eye, Portcullis House, Parliament Square, and St Margaret's Church.
The Palace of Westminster, Big Ben, and Westminster Bridge
One dial as it looked in 2014
The interior of the clock face
Cleaning of the south clock face on 11 August 2007
The second "Big Ben" (centre) and the Quarter Bells from The Illustrated News of the World, 4 December 1858
Big Ben
Double-decker buses frame a busy Whitehall with Elizabeth Tower in the background.
Scaffolding erected in 2017 to allow worker access
Elizabeth Tower with the scaffolding mostly removed, March 2022
Two dials in 2022 following restoration
A London-themed Paddington Bear statue, featuring Big Ben, located outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square in 2014

The tower was designed by Augustus Pugin in a neo-Gothic style.

E. W. Pugin

Memorial bust to Edward Pugin, in front of Granville House (formerly the Granville Hotel, Ramsgate). “In memory of Edward Welby Pugin, the gifted and accomplished son of Augustus Welby Pugin, one of England`s greatest architects: born 11th March, 1834, died 5th June, 1875. This bust is erected by Edmund Francis Davis. 1879.”
Meanwood Towers in Meanwood, Leeds
Gorton Monastery
Church of the English Martyrs, London E1
Rugby Town Hall
John's Lane Church in Dublin

Edward Welby Pugin (11 March 1834 – 5 June 1875) was an English architect, the eldest son of architect Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin and Louisa Barton and part of the Pugin & Pugin family of church architects.