A report on Aurangzeb

Aurangzeb holding a hawk in c. 1660
A painting from c. 1637 shows the brothers (left to right) Shah Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Baksh in their younger years.
The Mughal Army under the command of Aurangzeb recaptures Orchha in October 1635.
A painting from Padshahnama depicts Prince Aurangzeb facing a maddened war elephant named Sudhakar.
Sepoys loyal to the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb maintain their positions around the palace, at Aurangabad, in 1658.
Aurangzeb becomes emperor.
Mughal Empire under Aurangzeb in early 18th century
Aurangzeb compiled Hanafi law by introducing the Fatawa-e-Alamgiri.
Aurangzeb holding a flywhisk
Aurangzeb seated on a golden throne holding a Hawk in the Durbar. Standing before him is his son, Azam Shah.
Aurangzeb Receives Prince Mu'azzam. Chester Beatty Library
Dagger (Khanjar) of Aurangzeb (Badshah Alamgir).
Manuscript of the Quran, parts of which are believed to have been written in Aurangzeb's own hand.
The Birthday of the Grand Mogul Aurangzeb, made 1701–1708 by Johann Melchior Dinglinger.
Josiah Child requests a pardon from Aurangzeb during the Anglo-Mughal War.
By 1690, Aurangzeb was acknowledged as: "emperor of the Mughal Sultanate from Cape Comorin to Kabul".
Aurangzeb spent his reign crushing major and minor rebellions throughout the Mughal Empire.
The tomb of Akbar was pillaged by Jat rebels during the reign of Aurangzeb.
Aurangzeb leads the Mughal Army during the Battle of Satara.
Raja Shivaji at Aurangzeb's Darbar- M V Dhurandhar
Aurangzeb reciting the Quran.
Aurangzeb dispatched his personal imperial guard during the campaign against the Satnami rebels.
Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib in Delhi is built at the place where Guru Tegh Bahadur was beheaded.
Zafarnama is the name given to the letter sent by the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh in 1705 to Aurangzeb. The letter is written in Persian script.
Aurangzeb in a pavilion with three courtiers below.
Bibi Ka Maqbara, the mausoleum of Aurangzeb's wife Dilras Banu Begum, was commissioned by him
Aurangzeb's tomb in Khuldabad, Maharashtra.
Aurangzeb reading the Quran
The unmarked grave of Aurangzeb in the mausoleum at Khuldabad, Maharashtra.
Tughra and seal of Aurangzeb, on an imperial firman
In the year 1689, according to Mughal accounts, Sambhaji was put on trial, found guilty of atrocities and executed.<ref>{{cite book |last=Mehta |first=J. L. |title=Advanced Study in the History of Modern India: Volume One: 1707{{snd}}1813 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=d1wUgKKzawoC&pg=PA50 |access-date=29 September 2012 |date=2005 |publisher=Sterling Publishers |isbn=978-1-932705-54-6 |pages=50–}}</ref><ref name="google2">{{cite book |last=Stein |first=Burton |author-link=Burton Stein |year=2010 |orig-year=First published 1998 |editor-last=Arnold |editor-first=David |editor-link=David Arnold (historian) |title=A History of India |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=QY4zdTDwMAQC&pg=PA180 |publisher=Blackwell Publishers |edition=2nd |page=180 |isbn=978-1-4051-9509-6}}</ref>
Guru Tegh Bahadur was publicly executed in 1675 on the orders of Aurangzeb in Delhi<ref>{{Cite web |url=http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/Sikh-Guru-Ji'/Sri-Guru-Tegh-Bhadur-Sahib-Ji.html |title=A Gateway to Sikhism {{!}} Sri Guru Tegh Bhadur Sahib |website=Gateway to Sikhism |access-date=28 October 2018 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20140327223831/http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/Sikh-Guru-Ji'/Sri-Guru-Tegh-Bhadur-Sahib-Ji.html#12 |archive-date=27 March 2014 |url-status=dead}}</ref>
Sarmad Kashani, a Jewish convert to Islam and Sufi mystic was accused of heresy and executed.<ref name="David Cook 2007">{{cite book |last=Cook |first=David |author-link=David Cook (historian) |year=2007 |title=Martyrdom in Islam |publisher=Cambridge University Press |page=80 |isbn=978-0-521-85040-7}}</ref>
Daulatabad cannon
Kalak Bangadi cannon.
One of the Daulatabad cannons
Kilkila cannon
Aurangabad cannon
Seventeenth-century Badshahi Masjid built by Aurangzeb in Lahore.
Bibi ka Maqbara.
Tomb of Sufi saint, Syed Abdul Rahim Shah Bukhari constructed by Aurangzeb.
Shawls manufactured in the Mughal Empire had highly influenced other cultures around the world.
Shawl makers in the Mughal Empire.
Mughal imperial carpet
March of the Great Moghul (Aurangzeb)
François Bernier, was a French physician and traveller, who for 12 years was the personal physician of Aurangzeb. He described his experiences in Travels in the Mughal Empire.
Map of the Mughal Empire by Vincenzo Coronelli (1650–1718) of Venice, who served as Royal Geographer to Louis XIV of France.
French map of the Deccan.
Half rupee
Rupee coin showing full name
Rupee with square area
A copper dam of Aurangzeb
A Mughal trooper in the Deccan.
Aurangzeb leads his final expedition (1705), leading an army of 500,000 troops.
Mughal-era aristocrat armed with a matchlock musket.
Aurangzeb, in later life, hunting with hounds and falconers

The sixth emperor of the Mughal Empire, ruling from July 1658 until his death in 1707.

- Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb holding a hawk in c. 1660

144 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Along the Ghats of Mathura (circa 1880)

Mathura

2 links

City and the administrative headquarters of Mathura district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

City and the administrative headquarters of Mathura district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

Along the Ghats of Mathura (circa 1880)
General view of the excavations in January 1889 at Kankali Tila, Mathura
Gate of Shet Lukhmeechund's Temple, a photo by Eugene Clutterbuck Impey, 1860s.
Statue of Kanishka I, second century CE, Mathura Museum.
Sculpture of woman from ancient Braj-Mathura ca. second century CE.
Entrance to the Shri Krishna Janmabhoomi temple complex.

The Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb, built the Shahi-Eidgah Mosque during his rule, which is adjacent to Shri Krishna Janmabhoomi believed to be over a Hindu temple.

Battle of Jajau

2 links

Fought between the two Mughal princes and brothers Bahadur Shah I and Muhammad Azam Shah on 20 June 1707.

Fought between the two Mughal princes and brothers Bahadur Shah I and Muhammad Azam Shah on 20 June 1707.

In 1707, their father Aurangzeb died without having declared a successor; instead leaving a will in which he instructed his sons to divide the kingdom between themselves.

Flag Of Janjira State

Yakut Khan

2 links

Naval Admiral and administrator of Janjira Fort who first served under Bijapur Sultanate and later under the Mughal Empire.

Naval Admiral and administrator of Janjira Fort who first served under Bijapur Sultanate and later under the Mughal Empire.

Flag Of Janjira State

There, he was converted to Islam and got his new name as Qasim Khan and after becoming admiral of the Mughal navy, he was titled Yakut Khan by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb Alamgir.

View of the Rajasthan High Court, Sardar Museum in Umaid Park and upper right is Jodhpur fort in 1960.

Jodhpur

1 links

Second-largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan and officially the second metropolitan city of the state.

Second-largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan and officially the second metropolitan city of the state.

View of the Rajasthan High Court, Sardar Museum in Umaid Park and upper right is Jodhpur fort in 1960.
Street Scene of Jodhpur in 1906
Panoramic view of Jodhpur in a hot sunny day.
View of PWD Road and Mehrangarh from veer durgadas bridge, Jodhpur
Jaswant Thada
Kaylana Lake
Rajasthani thali
Footwear Design and Development Institute, Jodhpur
National Law University Jodhpur
Jodhpur National University
New building of Rajasthan High Court in Jodhpur.
Jodhpur junction railway station
Jodhpur Airport
High Rises on PWD road, Jodhpur
alt=|Cenotaphs at Mandore Garden
alt=|Mandore Gardens
alt=|Mahamandir Temple

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (circa 1679) after the death of Maharaja Jaswant Singh, but the prior ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years.

An 18th-century portrait of Mirza Ghiyas Beg. Color and gold over gold-sprinkled black ground on paper.

Mirza Ghiyas Beg

2 links

Important Persian official in the Mughal empire, whose children served as wives, mothers, and generals of the Mughal emperors.

Important Persian official in the Mughal empire, whose children served as wives, mothers, and generals of the Mughal emperors.

An 18th-century portrait of Mirza Ghiyas Beg. Color and gold over gold-sprinkled black ground on paper.
Emperor Jahangir and Mirza Ghiyas Beg
Mirza Ghiyas Beg's tomb in Agra

Shah Jahan married Abdul Hasan's daughter Arjumand Banu Begum, Mumtāz Mahal, who was the mother of his four sons, including his successor Aurangzeb.

View of Bijapur Fort from the moat

Bijapur Fort

1 links

Located in the Bijapur city in Bijapur District of the Indian state of Karnataka.

Located in the Bijapur city in Bijapur District of the Indian state of Karnataka.

View of Bijapur Fort from the moat
Chand Bibi, the regent of Bijapur
Ibrahim Rauza tomb
Barakaman- unfinished tomb of Ali Adil Shah
The Sangeet – Nari Mahal
300px

But after Shivaji Maharaj died, the Mughal led by Aurangzeb finally annexed the kingdom after the Siege of Bijapur in the year 1686 that eventually ended with the death of Sikandar Adil Shah the last of the Adil Shahi's. With this defeat, the 200-year rule of Adil Shahi dynasty ended and Bijapur sultanate was incorporated into the Mughal Empire, in 1686.

Jats

2 links

The Jat people (, ) are a traditionally agricultural community in Northern India and Pakistan.

The Jat people (, ) are a traditionally agricultural community in Northern India and Pakistan.

Jat Sikh of the "Sindhoo" clan, Lahore, 1872
The Hindu Jat Maharaja of Bharatpur, 1882
A Jutt (Jat) Muslim camel-driver from Sind, 1872
The Sikh Jat Maharaja of Patiala, 1898
Chaudhary Charan Singh, the first Jat Prime Minister of India, accompanied by his wife, on his way to address the nation at the Red Fort, Delhi, Independence Day, 15 August 1979.
14th Murrays Jat Lancers (Risaldar Major) by AC Lovett (1862–1919).jpg
A contingent of the Jat Regiment of Indian Army, during the Republic day parade

In 1669, the Hindu Jats, under the leadership of Gokula, rebelled against the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb in Mathura.

Berar Subah

1 links

One of the Subahs of the Mughal Empire, the first to be added to the original twelve, in Dakhin (Deccan, central India) from 1596 to 1724.

One of the Subahs of the Mughal Empire, the first to be added to the original twelve, in Dakhin (Deccan, central India) from 1596 to 1724.

Aurangzeb was appointed viceroy of four Deccan Subahs for the first time and he occupied the post for eight years (till 1644).

Portrait of Rajaram of Sinsini

Rajaram of Sinsini

0 links

Portrait of Rajaram of Sinsini

Raja Ram (reign 1670–1688) was the first Jat leader, who organised a rebellion against Aurangzeb.

A 1927 depiction of Tarabai in battle by noted Marathi painter M. V. Dhurandhar

Tarabai

4 links

The regent of the Maratha Empire of India from 1700 until 1708.

The regent of the Maratha Empire of India from 1700 until 1708.

A 1927 depiction of Tarabai in battle by noted Marathi painter M. V. Dhurandhar
Equestrian statue of Tarabai in Kolhapur

As the regent, Tarabai took charge of the war against the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's forces.