A report on Aurangzeb

Aurangzeb holding a hawk in c. 1660
A painting from c. 1637 shows the brothers (left to right) Shah Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Baksh in their younger years.
The Mughal Army under the command of Aurangzeb recaptures Orchha in October 1635.
A painting from Padshahnama depicts Prince Aurangzeb facing a maddened war elephant named Sudhakar.
Sepoys loyal to the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb maintain their positions around the palace, at Aurangabad, in 1658.
Aurangzeb becomes emperor.
Mughal Empire under Aurangzeb in early 18th century
Aurangzeb compiled Hanafi law by introducing the Fatawa-e-Alamgiri.
Aurangzeb holding a flywhisk
Aurangzeb seated on a golden throne holding a Hawk in the Durbar. Standing before him is his son, Azam Shah.
Aurangzeb Receives Prince Mu'azzam. Chester Beatty Library
Dagger (Khanjar) of Aurangzeb (Badshah Alamgir).
Manuscript of the Quran, parts of which are believed to have been written in Aurangzeb's own hand.
The Birthday of the Grand Mogul Aurangzeb, made 1701–1708 by Johann Melchior Dinglinger.
Josiah Child requests a pardon from Aurangzeb during the Anglo-Mughal War.
By 1690, Aurangzeb was acknowledged as: "emperor of the Mughal Sultanate from Cape Comorin to Kabul".
Aurangzeb spent his reign crushing major and minor rebellions throughout the Mughal Empire.
The tomb of Akbar was pillaged by Jat rebels during the reign of Aurangzeb.
Aurangzeb leads the Mughal Army during the Battle of Satara.
Raja Shivaji at Aurangzeb's Darbar- M V Dhurandhar
Aurangzeb reciting the Quran.
Aurangzeb dispatched his personal imperial guard during the campaign against the Satnami rebels.
Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib in Delhi is built at the place where Guru Tegh Bahadur was beheaded.
Zafarnama is the name given to the letter sent by the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh in 1705 to Aurangzeb. The letter is written in Persian script.
Aurangzeb in a pavilion with three courtiers below.
Bibi Ka Maqbara, the mausoleum of Aurangzeb's wife Dilras Banu Begum, was commissioned by him
Aurangzeb's tomb in Khuldabad, Maharashtra.
Aurangzeb reading the Quran
The unmarked grave of Aurangzeb in the mausoleum at Khuldabad, Maharashtra.
Tughra and seal of Aurangzeb, on an imperial firman
In the year 1689, according to Mughal accounts, Sambhaji was put on trial, found guilty of atrocities and executed.<ref>{{cite book |last=Mehta |first=J. L. |title=Advanced Study in the History of Modern India: Volume One: 1707{{snd}}1813 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=d1wUgKKzawoC&pg=PA50 |access-date=29 September 2012 |date=2005 |publisher=Sterling Publishers |isbn=978-1-932705-54-6 |pages=50–}}</ref><ref name="google2">{{cite book |last=Stein |first=Burton |author-link=Burton Stein |year=2010 |orig-year=First published 1998 |editor-last=Arnold |editor-first=David |editor-link=David Arnold (historian) |title=A History of India |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=QY4zdTDwMAQC&pg=PA180 |publisher=Blackwell Publishers |edition=2nd |page=180 |isbn=978-1-4051-9509-6}}</ref>
Guru Tegh Bahadur was publicly executed in 1675 on the orders of Aurangzeb in Delhi<ref>{{Cite web |url=http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/Sikh-Guru-Ji'/Sri-Guru-Tegh-Bhadur-Sahib-Ji.html |title=A Gateway to Sikhism {{!}} Sri Guru Tegh Bhadur Sahib |website=Gateway to Sikhism |access-date=28 October 2018 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20140327223831/http://www.allaboutsikhs.com/Sikh-Guru-Ji'/Sri-Guru-Tegh-Bhadur-Sahib-Ji.html#12 |archive-date=27 March 2014 |url-status=dead}}</ref>
Sarmad Kashani, a Jewish convert to Islam and Sufi mystic was accused of heresy and executed.<ref name="David Cook 2007">{{cite book |last=Cook |first=David |author-link=David Cook (historian) |year=2007 |title=Martyrdom in Islam |publisher=Cambridge University Press |page=80 |isbn=978-0-521-85040-7}}</ref>
Daulatabad cannon
Kalak Bangadi cannon.
One of the Daulatabad cannons
Kilkila cannon
Aurangabad cannon
Seventeenth-century Badshahi Masjid built by Aurangzeb in Lahore.
Bibi ka Maqbara.
Tomb of Sufi saint, Syed Abdul Rahim Shah Bukhari constructed by Aurangzeb.
Shawls manufactured in the Mughal Empire had highly influenced other cultures around the world.
Shawl makers in the Mughal Empire.
Mughal imperial carpet
March of the Great Moghul (Aurangzeb)
François Bernier, was a French physician and traveller, who for 12 years was the personal physician of Aurangzeb. He described his experiences in Travels in the Mughal Empire.
Map of the Mughal Empire by Vincenzo Coronelli (1650–1718) of Venice, who served as Royal Geographer to Louis XIV of France.
French map of the Deccan.
Half rupee
Rupee coin showing full name
Rupee with square area
A copper dam of Aurangzeb
A Mughal trooper in the Deccan.
Aurangzeb leads his final expedition (1705), leading an army of 500,000 troops.
Mughal-era aristocrat armed with a matchlock musket.
Aurangzeb, in later life, hunting with hounds and falconers

The sixth emperor of the Mughal Empire, ruling from July 1658 until his death in 1707.

- Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb holding a hawk in c. 1660

144 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,

Mughal architecture

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Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

Type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

The Taj Mahal at Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India is the most famous example of Mughal Architecture and one of India's most recognisable landmarks in general,
Badshahi Mosque, in Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is the last of the imperial mosques built by the Mughals
The Alamgiri Gate at Lahore Fort, Lahore, Pakistan, was named for Aurangzeb, who was sometimes referred to as "Alamgir".
Bibi Ka Maqbara is a tomb in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, which was built by Aurangzeb in the memory of his wife, Dilras Banu Begum
The use of elephant-shaped column brackets at Lahore Fort reflects Hindu influences on Mughal Architecture during the reign of Akbar
Gardens of Babur in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Islamia White Mosque
Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, India
Buland Darwaza, Agra was built by Akbar the Great to commemorate his victory.
The tomb of Shaikh Salim Chisti is considered to be one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture
Begum Shahi Mosque is Lahore's earliest dated Mughal period mosque
The tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Tāj Mahal.
The Tomb of Jahangir at Lahore does not have a dome as Jahangir forbade construction of a dome over his tomb.
Wazir Khan Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan, is considered to be the most ornately decorated Mughal-era mosque
The Shalimar Gardens, Lahore are among the most famous Mughal gardens.
The mosque's tile work exhibits Timurid influences introduced during Shah Jahan's campaigns in Central Asia.
The central chamber of the Shahi Hammam is decorated with frescoes
Badshahi Masjid, Lahore, Pakistan was the largest mosque in the world for 313 years, and is now the second-largest mosque in the Indian subcontinent.
Lalbagh Fort in Dhaka is an incomplete fort built by Prince Azam Shah
The 18th-century Sunehri Mosque is named for its gilded domes.
The Darwaza-i-Rauza (Great Gate) of the Taj Mahal.
Jali decorative work at the Tomb of Salim Chishti, Fatehpur Sikri.
Lahori Gate of the Red Fort, Delhi, India.
Jahangir's grave at the Tomb of Jahangir, decorated with parchin kari work.
Tomb of Nithar Begum at Khusro Bagh, Allahabad, India.
The shahada in Arabic calligraphy at the Wazir Khan Mosque, Lahore, Pakistan.
Akbar's Tomb at Agra, India uses red sandstone and white marble, like many of the Mughal monuments. The Taj Mahal is a notable exception, as it uses only marble.
Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of private audience) at Lahore Fort.
Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta, Pakistan. The mosque is not built in the Mughal style, but reflects a heavy Persian influence.
One of the Tombs of Ustad-Shagird, Nakodar, India.

The last of the great Mughal architects was Aurangzeb, who built the Badshahi Mosque, Bibi Ka Maqbara, Moti Masjid etc.

Nawab Bai

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Rahmat-un-Nissa (died c. undefined 1691), better known by her title Nawab Bai (meaning "The Great"), was a secondary wife of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb.

Ahmadnagar Sultanate

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Late medieval Indian kingdom located in the northwestern Deccan, between the sultanates of Gujarat and Bijapur.

Late medieval Indian kingdom located in the northwestern Deccan, between the sultanates of Gujarat and Bijapur.

Extent of Ahmadnagar Sultanate.
Battle of Talikota
Rama Raya's beheading in the Battle of Talikota.
Murtaza Nizam Shah II with Malik Ambar
The treacherous Mughal Viceroy of the Deccan Khan Jahan Lodi was executed in the year 1630, for covertly allying himself with Burhan Nizam Shah III, against the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan.
A pen and ink drawing of Ahmadnagar fort, c. 1885
Damadi Masjid <ref name="DGDE">{{cite web |last1=Maitra |first1=Sharmistha |title=Damadi Masjid, Ahmadnagar Cantonment |url=https://www.dgde.gov.in/content/damadi-masjid-ahmadnagar-cantonment |website=www.dgde.gov.in |publisher=Directorate General Defence Estates, Delhi Cantt |access-date=21 April 2020}}</ref>
Ahmednagar Fort
Tomb of Salabat Khan II, minister of Murtaza Nizam Shah I

In 1636 Aurangzeb, then Mugal viceroy of Deccan, finally annexed the sultanate to the Mughal Empire.

Aurangabadi Mahal

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Aurangabadi Mahal (meaning "Prosperity of the Throne"; died 1688) was a wife of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb.

From top and L-R: Sabarmati Ashram, Gujarati attire, Somnath Temple, Rann of Kutch, Dwarkadhish Temple, Statue of Unity, Laxmi Vilas Palace at Vadodara

Gujarat

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State along the western coast of India.

State along the western coast of India.

From top and L-R: Sabarmati Ashram, Gujarati attire, Somnath Temple, Rann of Kutch, Dwarkadhish Temple, Statue of Unity, Laxmi Vilas Palace at Vadodara
From top and L-R: Sabarmati Ashram, Gujarati attire, Somnath Temple, Rann of Kutch, Dwarkadhish Temple, Statue of Unity, Laxmi Vilas Palace at Vadodara
A modern Zoroastrian Agiary in Western India
Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad
Portrait of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb
Peshwa Baji Rao I riding a horse
Bombay Presidency in 1909, northern portion
Mahatma Gandhi picking salt at Dandi beach, South Gujarat ending the Salt satyagraha on 5 April 1930
Gujarati written in Gujarati script
1000px
Swarnim Sankul 2, Office of Gujarat Government
Mundra Port, Kutch
Tallest building in Gujarat: GIFT One
Shown here is the Tata Nano, the world's least expensive car. Sanand, Gujarat, is home to Tata Nano.
Surat is one of the fastest growing cities in the world.
Alang shipbreaking
Astonfield's 11.5 MW solar plant in Gujarat
Traditional farming
Amul plant at Anand
Hemchandra acharya with his disciple Kumarpal Raja. He is regarded as the father of the Gujarati language.
Depection of Shrimad Rajchandra writing Atmasiddhi in single sitting of 1.5 hrs, one of the longest Gujarati poetry based on Jain philosophy.
Gujarati thali
An Asiatic lion family, which occurs in and around Gir National Park
Greater flamingo, Jamnagar
Striped hyena at the Gir Forest National Park
Indroda Dinosaur and Fossil Park, Gandhinagar
Saputara – a hill station in Gujarat
Statue of Unity facing the Sardar Sarovar Dam on the river Narmada in Kevadiya colony
Tarnetar Fair, Tarnetar
A man in traditional costumes during Tarnetar fair
Kandla Port, Kutch
Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
The Gujarat National Law University, Gandhinagar
Campus at Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Gandhinagar
The clock tower in Gujarat University, Ahmedabad
Kala Bhavan, Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda
Rocket model at Science City, Ahmedabad
Mount Karo, Kutch
Cracked earth in the Rann of Kutch
The colourful Rann Utsav Festival is held annually in the Rann of Kutch.
People enjoying Raan Utsav at Dhordo, Kutch
Camel ride in Rann of Kutch
Greater Flamingo at Rann of Kutch
Hathisingh Jain Temple, Ahmedabad
Palitana temples
Modhera Sun Temple built by Bhimdev
Gurudwara Govinddham, Ahmedabad
Magen Abraham Jewish Synagogue
Jama Masjid (Friday Mosque, 15th century), Ahmedabad
Garba during Navaratri in Ahmedabad
Navratri Garba at Ambaji temple
Tourists playing Dandiya Raas
International Kite Festival, Ahmedabad
Statue of Mahatma Gandhi in Sabarmati Ashram, Ahmedabad
Somnath Temple, Veraval
Dwarkadhish Temple, Dwarka
Radha Damodar Temple, Junagadh
Kirti Toran, Vadnagar
Akshardham Gandhinagar
Jama Mosque, Champaner
Lakhota Museum in Jamnagar
Sun Temple, Modhera
Laxmi Vilas Palace, Vadodara
Vijay Vilas Palace, Mandvi, Kutch
Mahabat Maqbara, Junagadh
Vasai Jain Temple, Kutch
Wankaner palace, Wankaner
Mandvi Beach, Kutch
Muhammad ibn Qasim's conquest of Sindh (711-715 CE). 
Desert areas (Registan Desert and Thar Desert)
Zunbils
Kingdom of Sindh (c. 632– 712 CE)
Maitraka Kingdom (c.475–c.776 CE)

Aurangzeb, who was better known by his imperial title Alamgir ("Conqueror of the World"), was born at Dahod, Gujarat, and was the sixth Mughal Emperor ruling with an iron fist over most of the Indian subcontinent.

Recently identified portrait of Sulaiman Shikoh

Sulaiman Shikoh

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Mughal prince and the eldest son of Crown prince Dara Shikoh.

Mughal prince and the eldest son of Crown prince Dara Shikoh.

Recently identified portrait of Sulaiman Shikoh
Dara Shikoh (left) and Sulaiman Shikoh
An incomplete draft showing Dara Shikoh (left) with his son Sulaiman Shikoh (right)
A drawing of Sulaiman Shikoh
Dara Shikoh (left) with Sulaiman Shikoh

He was executed in May 1662 at Gwalior Fort on the orders of his paternal uncle, Emperor Aurangzeb.

Deccan plateau, Hyderabad, India

Deccan Plateau

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Located between the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, and is loosely defined as the peninsular region between these ranges that is south of the Narmada river.

Located between the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, and is loosely defined as the peninsular region between these ranges that is south of the Narmada river.

Deccan plateau, Hyderabad, India
The Deccan Plateau is a major part of South India (see inset for north and south Deccan Plateau)
Hogenakal Falls, Tamil Nadu
Tiruvannamalai hill, often regarded as the southern tip of the Deccan plateau, the city of Tiruvannamalai in Tamil Nadu itself considered the gateway to the plateau
Near Hampi, Karnataka
Rock formations at Hyderabad, Telangana Hills of granite boulders are a common feature of the landscape on the Deccan plateau.
Deccan Traps in Maharashtra

These raids, however, angered the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb and by 1680 he moved his capital from Delhi to Aurangabad in Deccan to conquer Maratha-held territories.

Multan

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City and capital of Multan Division located in Punjab, Pakistan.

City and capital of Multan Division located in Punjab, Pakistan.

Multan is famous for its large number of Sufi shrines, including the unique rectangular tomb of Shah Gardez that dates from the 1150s and is covered in blue enameled tiles typical of Multan.
The shrine of Shamsuddin Sabzwari dates from 1330, and has a unique green dome.
The Mausoleum of Shah Ali Akbar dating from the 1580s was built in the regional style that is typical of Multan's shrines.
Multan's Tomb of Shah Rukn-e-Alam is considered to be the earliest Tughluq era monument.
The 15th century Multani Caravanserai in Baku, Azerbaijan, was built to house visiting Multani merchants in the city.
Multan's Shahi Eid Gah Mosque dates from 1735 and is decorated with elaborate and intricate Mughal era frescoes.
Diwan Sawan Mal Chopra, the governor of Multan and Lahore.
Multan's "Bloody Bastion" was the site of fierce fighting during the Siege of Multan in 1848–49.
Multan's Ghanta Ghar dates from the British colonial period, and was built in the Indo-Saracenic style.
Shrine of Hazrat Baha-ud-din Zakariya
Multan's is home to a significant Christian minority.
Multan's Sufi shrines are often decorated during annual Urs festivals. Pictured is the Wali Muhammad Shah shrine.
Multan Cantonment railway station serves as the city's main railway station.
Multan International Airport offers flights throughout Pakistan, and direct flights to Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.
The tomb of Khawaja Awais Kagha displays use of traditional Multan tile-work on both its exterior and interior.
The shrine of Pir Adil Shah.
Multan Cricket Stadium from outside.

Upon his return from an expedition to Balkh in 1648, the future emperor Aurangzeb was appointed Governor of Multan and Sindh — a post he held until 1652.

Muhammad Akbar (Mughal prince)

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Muhammad Akbar ( 11 September 1657 – 31 March 1706 ) was a Mughal prince and the fourth son of Emperor Aurangzeb and his chief consort Dilras Banu Begum.

Portrait of Shah Shuja

Shah Shuja (Mughal prince)

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The second son of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan and Empress Mumtaz Mahal.

The second son of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan and Empress Mumtaz Mahal.

Portrait of Shah Shuja
Shah Shuja in his childhood, 1650
Shuja, Mughal prince
The Mughal armies of Aurangzeb and Shah Shuja confront each other.
A painting from circa 1637 shows the brothers (left to right) Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Baksh in their younger years
Bara Katra
Dhanmondi Eidgah
Hussaini Dalan
An etching of Bara Katra by Sir Charles D'Oyly in 1823

Shuja's siblings were the eldest sister Jahanara Begum, Dara Shikoh, Roshanara Begum, Aurangzeb, Murad Baksh, Gauhara Begum and others.