Australian Dream

Great Australian Dream
The Australian Dream or Great Australian Dream is a belief that in Australia, home-ownership can lead to a better life and is an expression of success and security.wikipedia
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John Brack

Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).
Most of these early paintings and drawings were unmistakably satirical comments against the Australian Dream, either being set in the newly expanding post-war suburbia or taking the life of those who lived there as their subject matter.

Quarter acre

sections
Typically the Australian Dream focused upon ownership of a detached house (often single storey) on a quarter acre suburban block, surrounded by a garden, which featured in the back a Hills Hoist and a barbecue.
Traditionally, Australians and New Zealanders aspired to own a 3- or 4-bedroom house or bungalow on a section of around a quarter of an acre (about 1,000 square metres), also known locally as the Australian Dream or the New Zealand dream.

John O'Grady (writer)

John O'Grady
Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).
*Australian Dream

New Zealand dream

Figure 2Kiwi Dream
New Zealand dream
The New Zealand dream is similar to the Australian Dream.

Home ownership in Australia

home-ownershiphousing
The Australian Dream or Great Australian Dream is a belief that in Australia, home-ownership can lead to a better life and is an expression of success and security.
Home ownership in Australia is considered a key cultural icon, and part of the Australian tradition known as the Great Australian Dream of "owning a detached house on a fenced block of land."

The Castle (1997 Australian film)

The CastleThe Castle'' (1997 Australian film)
The Castle (1997)
Kerrigan, and to a lesser extent his wife and children, are committed to their pursuit of the Australian Dream, a concept considered somewhat outdated.

Australian property bubble

Australian first home buyer (FHB) property bubbleexperienced dramatic rises in rental pricesSydney housing bubble
Australian property bubble
Australian Dream

Australia

🇦🇺AUSAustralian
The Australian Dream or Great Australian Dream is a belief that in Australia, home-ownership can lead to a better life and is an expression of success and security.

Standard of living

living standardsstandards of livingliving standard
Although this standard of living is enjoyed by many in the existing Australian population, rising house prices compared to average wages are making it increasingly difficult for many to achieve the "great Australian Dream", especially for those living in large cities.

Urbanization

urbanisationurbanizedUrban
It is also noted as having led to urbanisation (or more specifically suburbanisation), causing extensive urban sprawl in the major cities.

Suburb

suburbansuburbssuburbia
Typically the Australian Dream focused upon ownership of a detached house (often single storey) on a quarter acre suburban block, surrounded by a garden, which featured in the back a Hills Hoist and a barbecue. It is also noted as having led to urbanisation (or more specifically suburbanisation), causing extensive urban sprawl in the major cities.

Urban sprawl

suburban sprawlsprawlsprawling
It is also noted as having led to urbanisation (or more specifically suburbanisation), causing extensive urban sprawl in the major cities.

American Dream

the American DreamAmerican variantDream
The term itself is derived from the American Dream, which first described the same phenomenon in the United States, starting in the 1940s.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The term itself is derived from the American Dream, which first described the same phenomenon in the United States, starting in the 1940s.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The origin of the Australian Dream dates back to the period of reconstruction following World War II.

Baby boom

Baby-Boomers4–5% per yeara significant growth of their populations
The dream flowered in the 1950s and 1960s due chiefly to the expansion of Australian manufacturing, low unemployment rates, the baby boom and the removal of rent controls.

They're a Weird Mob

novel by John O'Gradynovel of the same namenovel of the same title
Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).

George Johnston (novelist)

George JohnstonGeorge Henry Johnston
Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).

Robin Boyd (architect)

Robin BoydBoydRobin Gerard Penleigh Boyd
Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).

The Australian Ugliness

Even as it was growing, the aspirational dream became an occasional object of ridicule in art and literature, some of the strongest criticism appearing in the mid-1950s paintings of John Brack, the celebrated novels of Australian manners They're a Weird Mob (1957) by Nino Culotta (John O'Grady) and My Brother Jack (1964) by George Johnston, and Robin Boyd's fierce critique of Australian architecture The Australian Ugliness (1960).

Single-family detached home

detached housesingle-family dwellingssingle-family dwelling
Typically the Australian Dream focused upon ownership of a detached house (often single storey) on a quarter acre suburban block, surrounded by a garden, which featured in the back a Hills Hoist and a barbecue.

Hills Hoist

Lance HillHills rotary clothes hoistrotary clothes hoist
Typically the Australian Dream focused upon ownership of a detached house (often single storey) on a quarter acre suburban block, surrounded by a garden, which featured in the back a Hills Hoist and a barbecue.

Barbecue

barbecuingBBQbarbeque
Typically the Australian Dream focused upon ownership of a detached house (often single storey) on a quarter acre suburban block, surrounded by a garden, which featured in the back a Hills Hoist and a barbecue.

Financial independence

financially independentfinancial freedomfinancial
If financial independence and the possession of a house were important, the Australian Dream was chiefly identified with embracing a particular lifestyle.

Nuclear family

nuclear familiesnuclearfamily
Those who had achieved the dream also followed a set of urban rituals, including taking an annual summer holiday by the ocean, living within a nuclear family, as well as—for male bread-winners—weekly lawn-mowing (preferably with a Victa lawn mower) and washing the family car (either a Ford or a Holden) on Saturday mornings.