Australian magpie

magpiesmagpieAustralian magpiespiping shrikeThe MagpiesWestern magpie
The Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) is a medium-sized black and white passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea.wikipedia
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Artamidae

magpie groupbutcherbirds and woodswallows
A member of the Artamidae, the Australian magpie is placed in its own genus Gymnorhina and is most closely related to the black butcherbird (Melloria quoyi). It is not, however, closely related to the European magpie, which is a corvid. However, the European magpie is a member of the Corvidae, while its Australian counterpart is placed in the family Artamidae (although both are members of a broad corvid lineage).
It includes 24 extant species in six genera and three subfamilies: Peltopsinae (with one genus, the peltops), Artaminae (with one genus, the woodswallows) and Cracticinae (currawongs, butcherbirds and the Australian magpie).

Collingwood Football Club

CollingwoodCollingwood MagpiesCollingwood reserves
The Australian magpie is the mascot of several Australian sporting teams, most notably the Collingwood Magpies, the Western Suburbs Magpies and Port Adelaide Magpies.
Collingwood's iconic home guernsey consists of black and white stripes, matching the colours of an Australian magpie.

John Latham (ornithologist)

John LathamLathamDr. Latham
The Australian magpie was first described by English ornithologist John Latham in 1801 as Coracias tibicen, the type collected in the Port Jackson region.
These included the emu, sulphur-crested cockatoo, wedge-tailed eagle, superb lyrebird and Australian magpie.

Songbird

songbirdsoscinesong bird
Described as one of Australia's most accomplished songbirds, the Australian magpie has an array of complex vocalisations.
Artamidae: butcherbirds, currawongs and Australian magpie (formerly in Cracticidae)

Currawong

birdcurrawongs
The Australian magpie's affinities with butcherbirds and currawongs were recognised early on and the three genera were placed in the family Cracticidae in 1914 by John Albert Leach after he had studied their musculature.
The true currawongs are a little larger than the Australian magpie, smaller than the ravens (except possibly the little raven, which is only slightly larger on average), but broadly similar in appearance.

Black butcherbird

A member of the Artamidae, the Australian magpie is placed in its own genus Gymnorhina and is most closely related to the black butcherbird (Melloria quoyi). It is not, however, closely related to the European magpie, which is a corvid.
Evidence was published in a 2013 molecular study which showed that it was the sister taxon to the Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen). The ancestor to the two species is thought to have split from the other butcherbirds between 8.3 and 4.2 million years ago, during the late Miocene to early Pliocene, while the two species themselves diverged sometime during the Pliocene (5.8–3.0 million years ago).

Corvida

corvid
However, the European magpie is a member of the Corvidae, while its Australian counterpart is placed in the family Artamidae (although both are members of a broad corvid lineage).

Pied butcherbird

Cracticus nigrogularispied butcherbird (''Cracticus nigrogularis'')
The pied butcherbird has a similar build and plumage, but has white underparts unlike the former species' black underparts.
The butcherbirds, Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) and currawongs (Strepera spp.) were placed in the family Cracticidae in 1914 by John Albert Leach after he had studied their musculature.

John Albert Leach

J. A. Leach
The Australian magpie's affinities with butcherbirds and currawongs were recognised early on and the three genera were placed in the family Cracticidae in 1914 by John Albert Leach after he had studied their musculature.
Among his contributions to ornithology was the relationship between the Australian magpie, butcherbirds and currawongs in the family Cracticidae, now sunk as a subfamily into Artamidae.

Noisy miner

bri-prrisoldier birds
Other bird species, such as the yellow-rumped thornbill (Acanthiza chrysorrhoa), willie wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys), southern whiteface (Aphelocephala leucopsis), and (less commonly) noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), often nest in the same tree as the magpie.
It has two broad-frequency alarm calls that are used when mobbing intruders into their territory, or when predators (including humans) are sighted; and a narrow-frequency alarm call that is primarily used when airborne predators are seen, such as the brown falcon (Falco berigora), or other large flying birds including the Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) and the pied currawong (Strepera graculina). The aerial predator alarm call is a series of high-pitched, slurred whistling notes.

Australian magpies in New Zealand

Australian magpieAustralian magpie was introduced into New Zealandmagpies
Australian magpies in New Zealand
The Australian magpie is a medium-sized black and white passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea.

Magpie-lark

Magpie LarkPeewee
The magpie-lark is a much smaller and more delicate bird with complex and very different banded black and white plumage.
A primarily carnivorous species that eats all sorts of small creatures, the magpie-lark can adapt to an enormous range of different habitats, requiring only some soft, bare ground for foraging, a supply of mud for making a nest, and a tree to make it in. It has benefited greatly from agriculture: both the clearing of dense forest in fertile zones and the provision of artesian water in arid areas—although a disaster for other species—have been a boon for bare-ground and short-grass feeders like magpies and magpie-larks.

Taveuni

Taveuni Island
It has become established in western Taveuni in Fiji, however.
Taveuni is also home to the Taveuni beetle, maroon shining parrot, Fiji goshawk, azure-crested flycatcher, Fiji white-eye, Fiji parrot finch, orange dove and the kula parrot, and the Australian magpie, introduced to control coconut pests, has proliferated on the island.

The Magpies

In Denis Glover's poem "The Magpies", the mature magpie's call is described as quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle, one of the most famous lines in New Zealand poetry, and as waddle giggle gargle paddle poodle, in the children's book Waddle Giggle Gargle by Pamela Allen. One of the best-known New Zealand poems is "The Magpies" by Denis Glover, with its refrain "Quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle", imitating the sound of the bird – and the popular New Zealand comic Footrot Flats features a magpie character by the name of Pew.
The phrase imitating the call of the Australian magpie is one of the most well-known lines in New Zealand poetry.

Willie wagtail

willy wagtailwagtailswilly wagtails
Other bird species, such as the yellow-rumped thornbill (Acanthiza chrysorrhoa), willie wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys), southern whiteface (Aphelocephala leucopsis), and (less commonly) noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), often nest in the same tree as the magpie.
The willie wagtail is highly territorial and can be quite fearless in defence of its territory; it will harry not only small birds but also much larger species such as the Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen), raven (Corvus coronoides), laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae), or wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax). It may even attack domestic dogs, cats and humans which approach its nest too closely.

Blue-faced honeyeater

Play may even take place with other species such as blue-faced honeyeaters and Australasian pipits.
A single bird was recorded aping and playing with an immature Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) in Proserpine, Queensland.

Birds of Australia

birdAustralian birdsnative birds
Birds of Australia
Corvid radiation: Passerines peculiar to Australasia, descended from the crow family, and now occupying a vast range of roles and sizes; examples include wrens, robins, magpies, thornbills, pardalotes, the huge honeyeater family, treecreepers, lyrebirds, birds-of-paradise and bowerbirds

Denis Glover

In Denis Glover's poem "The Magpies", the mature magpie's call is described as quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle, one of the most famous lines in New Zealand poetry, and as waddle giggle gargle paddle poodle, in the children's book Waddle Giggle Gargle by Pamela Allen. One of the best-known New Zealand poems is "The Magpies" by Denis Glover, with its refrain "Quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle", imitating the sound of the bird – and the popular New Zealand comic Footrot Flats features a magpie character by the name of Pew.
The refrain of the latter ("Quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle", imitating the sound of the Australian magpie) is one of the most famous lines in New Zealand poetry.

Piping shrike

Under the name piping shrike, the white-backed magpie was declared the official emblem of the Government of South Australia in 1901 by Governor Tennyson, and has featured on the South Australian flag since 1904.
The term piping shrike for this species of Australian magpie is correct, yet uncommon.

Australian raven

crowravenravens
The Australian raven may take nestlings left unattended.
Despite their fondness for roadkill, fewer ravens are hit by vehicles than Australian magpies.

Footrot Flats

DogFootrot Flats the Musicalmain characters
One of the best-known New Zealand poems is "The Magpies" by Denis Glover, with its refrain "Quardle oodle ardle wardle doodle", imitating the sound of the bird – and the popular New Zealand comic Footrot Flats features a magpie character by the name of Pew.
Cooch owns the Dog's girlfriend Jess and a pet magpie called Pew.

Yellow-rumped thornbill

Other bird species, such as the yellow-rumped thornbill (Acanthiza chrysorrhoa), willie wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys), southern whiteface (Aphelocephala leucopsis), and (less commonly) noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala), often nest in the same tree as the magpie.
Many species of bird take eggs and chicks from the nest, including red wattlebirds, currawongs, Australian magpies and ravens, and many honeyeaters will destroy their nests in order to steal nesting material.

Channel-billed cuckoo

night cuckoo
The channel-billed cuckoo (Scythrops novaehollandiae) is a notable brood parasite in eastern Australia; magpies will raise cuckoo young, which eventually outcompete the magpie nestlings.
The host species varies depending on the location; the most commonly targeted hosts are ravens, currawongs, butcherbirds and Australian magpies.

Passerine

Passeriformespasserinesperching bird
The Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) is a medium-sized black and white passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea.

Australia

🇦🇺AUSAustralian
The Australian magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) is a medium-sized black and white passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea.