Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustriansHabsburg EmpireImperial AustrianEmpire of AustriaAustrian ImperialAustroImperial AustriaAustrian Emperor
The Austrian Empire (, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1867, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.wikipedia
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Habsburg Monarchy

Habsburg EmpireHabsburgAustria
The Austrian Empire (, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1867, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.
From 1804 to 1867 the Habsburg Monarchy was formally unified as the Austrian Empire, and from 1867 to 1918 as the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

German Confederation

GermanyGermanGerman states
Along with Prussia, it was one of the two major powers of the German Confederation.
The Confederation was weakened by rivalry between the Kingdom of Prussia and the Austrian Empire, revolution, and the inability of the multiple members to compromise.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
After Austria was defeated in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 was adopted, joining together the Kingdom of Hungary and the Empire of Austria to form Austria-Hungary.
It was formed when the Austrian Empire adopted a new constitution; as a result Austria (Cisleithania) and Hungary (Transleithania) were placed on equal footing.

Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)

Kingdom of HungaryRoyal HungaryHungary
The Kingdom of Hungary—as Regnum Independens—was administered by its own institutions separately from the rest of the empire.
The Kingdom of Hungary between 1526 and 1867, while outside the Holy Roman Empire, was part of the lands of the Habsburg Monarchy that became the Empire of Austria in 1804.

Empire

imperialempiresimperial power
During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom in Europe.
The Unification of Germany as the empire accreted to the Prussian metropole was less a military conquest of the German states than their political divorce from the Austrian Empire, which formerly ruled loosely over the Holy Roman Empire.

First French Empire

French EmpireFranceFrench
Proclaimed in response to the First French Empire, it partially overlapped with the Holy Roman Empire until the latter's dissolution in 1806.
The French Empire achieved military supremacy in mainland Europe through notable victories in the War of the Third Coalition against Austria, Prussia, Russia, and allied nations, notably at the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805.

Austro-Prussian War

War of 1866Seven Weeks' WarAustro-Prussian
After Austria was defeated in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 was adopted, joining together the Kingdom of Hungary and the Empire of Austria to form Austria-Hungary.
The Austro-Prussian War or Seven Weeks' War (also known as the Unification War, the War of 1866, the Fraternal War, in Germany as the German War, and also by a variety of other names) was a war fought in 1866 between the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia, with each also being aided by various allies within the German Confederation.

Emperor of Austria

EmperorAustrian EmperorEmperors of Austria
Taking this significant change into consideration, the Holy Roman Emperor Francis II created the title Emperor of Austria, for himself and his successors.
The Emperor of Austria (German: Kaiser von Österreich) was the ruler of the Austrian Empire and later the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Russian Empire

RussiaImperial RussiaRussian
During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom in Europe.
Then, by plotting with the rulers of Austria and Prussia, she incorporated territories of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth during the Partitions of Poland, pushing the Russian frontier westward into Central Europe.

Napoleon

Napoleon BonaparteNapoleon INapoleon I of France
He did so because he foresaw either the end of the Holy Roman Empire, or the eventual accession as Holy Roman Emperor of Napoleon, who had earlier that year adopted the title of an Emperor of the French; Francis II eventually abandoned the title of German-Roman Emperor later in 1806.
Napoleon shattered this coalition with decisive victories in the Ulm Campaign and a historic triumph over the Russian Empire and Austrian Empire at the Battle of Austerlitz which led to the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire.

Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867

compromise of 1867AusgleichAustro-Hungarian Compromise
After Austria was defeated in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 was adopted, joining together the Kingdom of Hungary and the Empire of Austria to form Austria-Hungary.
Under the Compromise, the lands of the House of Habsburg were reorganized as a real union between the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary, headed by a single monarch who reigned as Emperor of Austria in the Austrian half of the empire, and as King of Hungary in Kingdom of Hungary.

Great power

Great Powersworld powermajor power
The Austrian Empire (, modern spelling Kaisertum Österreich) was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1867, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs.
The Congress of Vienna consisted of five main powers: the Austrian Empire, France, Prussia, Russia, and the United Kingdom (UK).

Battle of Austerlitz

AusterlitzAusterlitz 1805Austerlitz campaign
Napoleon's army won another victory at Austerlitz on 2 December 1805.
The battle occurred near the town of Austerlitz in the Austrian Empire (modern-day Slavkov u Brna in the Czech Republic).

Battle of Ulm

UlmSiege of UlmUlm Maneuver
On 20 October 1805, an Austrian army led by General Karl Mack von Leiberich was defeated by French armies near the town of Ulm.
In 1805, the United Kingdom, the Austrian Empire, Sweden, and the Russian Empire formed the Third Coalition to overthrow the French Empire.

Regensburg

RatisbonRegensburg, GermanyCastra Regina
Changes shaping the nature of the Holy Roman Empire took place during conferences in Rastatt (1797–1799) and Regensburg (1801–1803).
Between April 19 and April 23, 1809, Regensburg was the scene of the Battle of Ratisbon between forces commanded by Henri Gatien Bertrand and Napoleon himself and the retreating Austrian forces.

Confederation of the Rhine

StateGermanyRheinbund
On 12 July 1806, the Confederation of the Rhine was established, comprising 16 sovereigns and countries.
It was formed initially from sixteen German states by Napoleon after he defeated Austria and Russia at the Battle of Austerlitz.

Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria

Maximilian IMaximilian I JosephMaximilian Joseph
On 10 December 1805, Maximilian IV Joseph, the prince-elector and Duke of Bavaria, proclaimed himself King, followed by the Duke of Württemberg Frederick III on 11 December.
During his time at the University of Strasbourg, Klemens von Metternich, the future Austrian chancellor, was for some time accommodated by Prince Maximilian.

Congress of Vienna

Vienna CongressTreaty of ViennaFinal Act of the Congress of Vienna
Following the Napoleonic Wars, Metternich was the chief architect of the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
The Congress of Vienna (Congrès de Vienne, Wiener Kongress), also called Vienna Congress, was a meeting of ambassadors of European states chaired by Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich, and held in Vienna from November 1814 to June 1815, though the delegates had arrived and were already negotiating by late September 1814.

Napoleonic Wars

Napoleonic WarNapoleonicwar with France
Following the Napoleonic Wars, Metternich was the chief architect of the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
In 1805, Austria and Russia started the Third Coalition and waged war against France.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Francis II agreed to the humiliating Treaty of Pressburg (26 December 1805), which in practice meant the dissolution of the long-lived Holy Roman Empire and a reorganization under a Napoleonic imprint of the German territories lost in the process into a precursor state of what became modern Germany, those possessions nominally having been part of the Holy Roman Empire within the present boundaries of Germany, as well as other measures weakening Austria and the Habsburgs in other ways.
The subsequent (and decisive) Prussian victory in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 enabled him to create the North German Confederation (Norddeutscher Bund) which excluded Austria from the federation's affairs.

Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire

Revolutions of 1848Revolution of 18481848 revolution
The liberal Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire forced Metternich's resignation.
A set of revolutions took place in the Austrian Empire from March 1848 to November 1849.

List of ministers-president of Austria

Minister-President of AustriaMinister-PresidentMinister-President of Cisleithania
The leadership of the Austrian Empire was transferred to a state council composed of Metternich, Francis II's brother Archduke Louis, and Count Franz Anton Kolowrat, who later became the first Minister-President of the Austrian Empire.
The minister-president of Austria was the head of government of the Austrian Empire from 1848, when the office was created in the course of the March Revolution.

Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky

Count KolowratCount Franz Anton II.Count Franz Anton Kolowrat
The leadership of the Austrian Empire was transferred to a state council composed of Metternich, Francis II's brother Archduke Louis, and Count Franz Anton Kolowrat, who later became the first Minister-President of the Austrian Empire.
Count Franz Anton von Kolowrat-Liebsteinsky (František Antonín Kolovrat-Libštejnský; 31 January 1778 – 4 April 1861) was Bohemian noble and Austrian statesman from the House of Kolowrat.

Prussia

PrussianPrussian statePrussian army
The Austrian Empire was the main beneficiary from the Congress of Vienna and it established an alliance with Britain, Prussia, and Russia forming the Quadruple Alliance.
During the 19th century Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck united the German principalities into a "Lesser Germany", which excluded the Austrian Empire.

Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg

Felix zu SchwarzenbergPrince SchwarzenbergFelix Schwarzenberg
After the death of Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg in 1852, the Minister of the Interior Baron Alexander von Bach largely dictated policy in Austria and Hungary.
Felix Ludwig Johann Friedrich, Prince of Schwarzenberg (Felix Ludwig Johann Friedrich Prinz zu Schwarzenberg; Felix Ludvík Jan Bedřich princ ze Schwarzenbergu; 2 October 1800 – 5 April 1852) was a Bohemian nobleman and an Austrian statesman who restored the Austrian Empire as a European great power following the Revolutions of 1848.