Author

Mark Twain was a prominent American author in multiple genres, including fiction and journalism, during the 19th century.

Creator or originator of any written work such as a book or play, and is also considered a writer or poet.

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Mark Twain was a prominent American author in multiple genres, including fiction and journalism, during the 19th century.

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American author and publisher Dave Eggers is one of several contemporary authors who represent the latest movement in post-modern literature which some have deemed post-postmodernism or post-irony.

Postmodern literature

Form of literature that is characterized by the use of metafiction, unreliable narration, self-reflexivity, intertextuality, and which often thematizes both historical and political issues.

Form of literature that is characterized by the use of metafiction, unreliable narration, self-reflexivity, intertextuality, and which often thematizes both historical and political issues.

American author and publisher Dave Eggers is one of several contemporary authors who represent the latest movement in post-modern literature which some have deemed post-postmodernism or post-irony.

This style of experimental literature emerged strongly in the United States in the 1960s through the writings of authors such as Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, William Gaddis, Philip K. Dick, Kathy Acker, and John Barth.

Mark Twain was a prominent American author in multiple genres, including fiction and journalism, during the 19th century.

Joint authorship

Mark Twain was a prominent American author in multiple genres, including fiction and journalism, during the 19th century.

Joint authorship of a copyrightable work is when two or more persons contribute enough to the work to be the author of that work.

European output of books before the advent of copyright, 6th century to 18th century. Blue shows printed books. Log-lin plot; a straight line therefore shows an exponential increase.

Copyright

Type of intellectual property that gives its owner the exclusive right to copy, distribute, adapt, display, and perform a creative work, usually for a limited time.

Type of intellectual property that gives its owner the exclusive right to copy, distribute, adapt, display, and perform a creative work, usually for a limited time.

European output of books before the advent of copyright, 6th century to 18th century. Blue shows printed books. Log-lin plot; a straight line therefore shows an exponential increase.
The Statute of Anne (the Copyright Act 1709) came into force in 1710.
The Pirate Publisher—An International Burlesque that has the Longest Run on Record, from Puck, 1886, satirizes the then-existing situation where a publisher could profit by simply copying newly published works from one country, and publishing them in another, and vice versa.
A copyright symbol used in copyright notice
A copyright symbol embossed on a piece of paper.
Expansion of US copyright law (currently based on the date of creation or publication)
DVD: All rights reserved

Typically, the first owner of a copyright is the person who created the work i.e. the author.

The Parnassus (1511) by Raphael: famous poets recite alongside the nine Muses atop Mount Parnassus.

Poet

Person who creates poetry.

Person who creates poetry.

The Parnassus (1511) by Raphael: famous poets recite alongside the nine Muses atop Mount Parnassus.

A poet may simply be the creator (thinker, songwriter, writer, or author) who creates (composes) poems (oral or written), or they may also perform their art to an audience.

The Gutenberg Bible, one of the first books to be printed using the printing press.

Book

Medium for recording information in the form of writing or images, typically composed of many pages bound together and protected by a cover.

Medium for recording information in the form of writing or images, typically composed of many pages bound together and protected by a cover.

The Gutenberg Bible, one of the first books to be printed using the printing press.
Fragments of the Instructions of Shuruppak: "Shurrupak gave instructions to his son: Do not buy an ass which brays too much. Do not commit rape upon a man's daughter, do not announce it to the courtyard. Do not answer back against your father, do not raise a 'heavy eye.'". From Adab, c. 2600–2500 BCE
Book of the Dead of Hunefer; c. 1275 BC; ink and pigments on papyrus; 45 × 90.5 cm; British Museum (London)
A Chinese bamboo book meets the modern definition of Codex
Folio 14 recto of the 5th century Vergilius Romanus contains an author portrait of Virgil. Note the bookcase (capsa), reading stand and the text written without word spacing in rustic capitals.
The Codex Amiatinus anachronistically depicts the Biblical Ezra with the kind of books used in the 8th Century AD.
Burgundian author and scribe Jean Miélot, from his Miracles de Notre Dame, 15th century.
Desk with chained books in the Malatestiana Library of Cesena, Italy.
Bagh print, a traditional woodblock printing technique that originated in Bagh Madhya Pradesh, India.
A 15th-century Incunable. Notice the blind-tooled cover, corner bosses and clasps.
Selected Teachings of Buddhist Sages and Son Masters, the earliest known book printed with movable metal type, printed in Korea, in 1377, Bibliothèque nationale de France.
The spine of the book is an important aspect in book design, especially in the cover design. When the books are stacked up or stored in a shelf, the details on the spine is the only visible surface that contains the information about the book. In stores, it is the details on the spine that attract a buyer's attention first.
Parts of a modern case bound book
Book covers
Book pages
A screen of a Kindle e-reader.
Actual-size facsimile of the Codex Gigas, also known as the 'Devil's Bible' (from the illustration at right)
A page from the world's largest book. Each page is three and a half feet wide, five feet tall and a little over five inches thick
Novels in a bookstore
A page from a dictionary
An atlas
A page from a notebook used as hand written diary
A telephone directory, with business and residence listings.
Hardcover books
Paperback books
Cigarette smuggling with a book
The Library of Celsus in Ephesus, Turkey was built in 135 AD, and could house around 12,000 scrolls.
ISBN with barcode
Books on library shelves and call numbers visible on the spines
Halfbound book with leather and marbled paper.

The Christian authors may also have wanted to distinguish their writings from the pagan and Judaic texts written on scrolls.

Christine de Pizan (sitting) lecturing to a group of men standing

Christine de Pizan

Italian poet and court writer for King Charles VI of France and several French dukes.

Italian poet and court writer for King Charles VI of France and several French dukes.

Christine de Pizan (sitting) lecturing to a group of men standing
A miniature of Queen Penthesilea with her army of Amazons coming to the aid of the Trojan army, illustrating L'Épître Othéa a Hector
One page of Christine's book Le livre des trois vertus. In the illumination Christine is kept from rest by the Three Virtues.
Christine de Pizan presents her book to Isabeau of Bavaria, Queen of France.
Detail of a miniature of ladies watching knights jousting, illustrating 'Le Duc des vrais amants', from a collection of works presented in 1414 by Christine to Isabeau of Bavaria.
Illumination from The Book of the City of Ladies. Christine is shown before the personifications of Rectitude, Reason, and Justice in her study, and working alongside Justice to build the 'Cité des dames'.
Queen Fredegund addressing her troops holding her baby. Miniature from a 1475 Dutch translation of The Book of the City of Ladies. Published under the title De Stede der Vrouwen (The Praise of Women).
Page 1 of The Book of Feats of Arms and of Chivalry. Translated into English and printed in 1489 by William Caxton.

As a mark of ownership and authorship the opening frontispiece depicts Queen Isabeau being presented with the book by Christine.

The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883) is a canonical piece of children's literature and one of the best-selling books ever published.

Outline of literature

Provided as an overview of and topical guide to literature .

Provided as an overview of and topical guide to literature .

The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883) is a canonical piece of children's literature and one of the best-selling books ever published.

Author

Barker at the Science Fiction Museum in 2007

Clive Barker

Barker at the Science Fiction Museum in 2007

Clive Barker (born 5 October 1952) is an English playwright, author, film director and visual artist who came to prominence in the mid-1980s with a series of short stories, the Books of Blood, which established him as a leading horror writer.

Davy Crockett by William Henry Huddle, 1889.

Logrolling

Trading of favors, or quid pro quo, such as vote trading by legislative members to obtain passage of actions of interest to each legislative member.

Trading of favors, or quid pro quo, such as vote trading by legislative members to obtain passage of actions of interest to each legislative member.

Davy Crockett by William Henry Huddle, 1889.

Private Eye magazine regularly draws attention to alleged logrolling by authors in "books of the year" features published by British newspapers and magazines.

Quotative Particle "-tte" and "to" in Japanese.

Quotation

Repetition of a sentence, phrase, or passage from speech or text that someone has said or written.

Repetition of a sentence, phrase, or passage from speech or text that someone has said or written.

Quotative Particle "-tte" and "to" in Japanese.
Quotative Evidential "=si" in Cusco Quechua.

Quotations are used for a variety of reasons: to illuminate the meaning or to support the arguments of the work in which it is being quoted, to provide direct information about the work being quoted (whether in order to discuss it, positively or negatively), to pay homage to the original work or author, to make the user of the quotation seem well-read, and/or to comply with copyright law.