Autistic enterocolitis

withdrew their support
Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism.wikipedia
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Andrew Wakefield

Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism.
Most of Wakefield's co-authors then withdrew their support for the study's interpretations.

Arthur Krigsman

The opinions were critical of Arthur Krigsman and his testimony about autistic enterocolitis, which the court said that he described as a "new form of gastrointestinal [GI] disorder."
He specializes in the evaluation and treatment of gastrointestinal pathology in children with autism spectrum disorders, and has written in support of the diagnosis he calls autistic enterocolitis.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism.

Gastroenterology

gastroenterologistgastroenterologistsgastroenterological
Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism.

Autism

autisticautistic disorderautistic children
Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism. Until the 1970s, autism was rarely accepted to be a distinctive diagnosis, but, following changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association it is diagnosed much more often.

Enterocolitis

enteric colitisenteritisinfectious enterocolitis
The existence of such an enterocolitis has been dismissed by experts as having "not been established".

General Medical Council

GMCstruck offMedical Register
Most of Wakefield's coauthors later retracted the conclusions of the original paper proposing the hypothesis, and the General Medical Council found Wakefield guilty of manipulating patient data and misreporting results.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSM-IVDSM-IV-TRDSM
Until the 1970s, autism was rarely accepted to be a distinctive diagnosis, but, following changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association it is diagnosed much more often.

American Psychiatric Association

APAAmerican Medico-Psychological AssociationAmerican Psychiatry Association
Until the 1970s, autism was rarely accepted to be a distinctive diagnosis, but, following changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association it is diagnosed much more often.

Prevalence

lifetime prevalenceprevalence ratemorbidity rate
How much of this increase is due to greater diagnostic vigilance by doctors, changes in diagnostic categories, or an actual increase in prevalence, remains unclear.

Peer review

peer-reviewedpeer-reviewpeer reviewed
Despite others describing common bowel features, there have been no peer reviewed studies yet published, as of 2006, corroborating the existence of autistic enterocolitis; other studies have explicitly refuted its existence.

Inflammatory bowel disease

inflammatory bowel diseasesIBDindeterminate colitis
When Wakefield and his colleagues first reported in 1998 a possible association between autistic regression, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and MMR vaccines in the Lancet, they evaluated a dozen children with pervasive developmental disorders, apparent developmental regression, and intestinal symptoms, referred to the Royal Free Hospital.

MMR vaccine

MMRmeasles-mumps-rubella vaccineMMR vaccination
When Wakefield and his colleagues first reported in 1998 a possible association between autistic regression, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and MMR vaccines in the Lancet, they evaluated a dozen children with pervasive developmental disorders, apparent developmental regression, and intestinal symptoms, referred to the Royal Free Hospital.

The Lancet

LancetLancet OncologyThe Lancet Oncology
When Wakefield and his colleagues first reported in 1998 a possible association between autistic regression, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and MMR vaccines in the Lancet, they evaluated a dozen children with pervasive developmental disorders, apparent developmental regression, and intestinal symptoms, referred to the Royal Free Hospital.

Pervasive developmental disorder

pervasive developmental disordersPDDPervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD)
When Wakefield and his colleagues first reported in 1998 a possible association between autistic regression, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and MMR vaccines in the Lancet, they evaluated a dozen children with pervasive developmental disorders, apparent developmental regression, and intestinal symptoms, referred to the Royal Free Hospital.

Royal Free Hospital

Royal FreeThe Royal Free HospitalHampstead General Hospital
When Wakefield and his colleagues first reported in 1998 a possible association between autistic regression, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and MMR vaccines in the Lancet, they evaluated a dozen children with pervasive developmental disorders, apparent developmental regression, and intestinal symptoms, referred to the Royal Free Hospital.

Ileum

terminal ileumilealsmall bowel
The most consistent report was lymphoid nodular hyperplasia of the terminal ileum in nine of the children.

Brian Deer

In an April 2010 investigation into the origins of claims for "autistic enterocolitis", reporter Brian Deer revealed in the BMJ that the original pathology results on the children in the study (obtained from the Royal Free hospital) had been subjected to wholesale changes, from normal to abnormal, in the medical school.

The BMJ

British Medical JournalBMJThe British Medical Journal
In an April 2010 investigation into the origins of claims for "autistic enterocolitis", reporter Brian Deer revealed in the BMJ that the original pathology results on the children in the study (obtained from the Royal Free hospital) had been subjected to wholesale changes, from normal to abnormal, in the medical school. Late-onset autism cases are estimated at 25% and reported by sources including the British Medical Journal as not having changed in recent years.

Fraud

defraudfraudsterfraudulent
An accompanying editorial in the same journal described Wakefield's work as an "elaborate fraud" which led to lower vaccination rates, putting hundreds of thousands of children at risk and diverting energy and money away from research into the true cause of autism.

Large intestine

coloncolorectallarge bowel
Biopsies of the colon were reported to have shown a diffuse mononuclear cell infiltrate in six.