Avitus

EparchiusEparchius AvitusM. Maecilius Eparchius Avitus AugustusMarcus Maecilius Avitus
Marcus Maecilius Flavius Eparchius Avitus c.wikipedia
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Ecdicius

Ecdicius Avitus
Avitus had two sons, Agricola (fl 455 – living 507, a vir illustris) and Ecdicius Avitus (later patricius and magister militum under Emperor Julius Nepos) and a daughter Papianilla; she married Sidonius Apollinaris, whose letters and panegyrics remain an important source for Avitus' life and times.
As a son of the Emperor Avitus, Ecdicius was educated at Augustonemetum (modern Clermont-Ferrand), where he lived and owned some land.

Papianilla (wife of Sidonius Apollinaris)

Papianilla
Avitus had two sons, Agricola (fl 455 – living 507, a vir illustris) and Ecdicius Avitus (later patricius and magister militum under Emperor Julius Nepos) and a daughter Papianilla; she married Sidonius Apollinaris, whose letters and panegyrics remain an important source for Avitus' life and times.
She was the daughter of Eparchius Avitus, who rose from the Gallo-Roman senatorial aristocracy to become Western Roman Emperor from 455 to 456.

Visigoths

VisigothicVisigothGothic
Avitus had a good relationship with the Visigoths, in particular with their king Theodoric II, who was a friend of his and who acclaimed Avitus Emperor. His relative Theodorus was hostage at the court of the King of Visigoths, Theodoric I.
The last indication that the Goths whose king reigned at Toulouse thought of themselves as "Vesi" is found in a panegyric on Avitus by Sidonius Apollinaris dated 1 January 456.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
A Gallo-Roman aristocrat, he opposed the reduction of the Western Roman Empire to Italy alone, both politically and from an administrative point of view.
Avitus, a prominent general under Petronius, was proclaimed emperor by the Visigothic king Theoderic II and accepted as such by the Roman Senate.

Magister militum

magistri militummagister peditummagister militum per Orientem
Avitus had two sons, Agricola (fl 455 – living 507, a vir illustris) and Ecdicius Avitus (later patricius and magister militum under Emperor Julius Nepos) and a daughter Papianilla; she married Sidonius Apollinaris, whose letters and panegyrics remain an important source for Avitus' life and times. He then started a military career serving under the magister militum Aetius in his campaign against the Juthungi and the Norics (430–431) and against the Burgundians (436). He probably travelled to Noricum to restore the imperial authority in that province, and then passed through Ravenna, where he left a Gothic force under the new patricius and magister militum Remistus, a Visigoth. In the late spring of 455, Avitus was recalled to service by emperor Petronius Maximus and was elevated to the rank of magister militum, probably praesentalis; Maximus sent Avitus in an embassy to the court of Theodoric II, who had succeeded to his father, at Toulouse.
455 - 456: Avitus & Remistus

Sidonius Apollinaris

SidoniusGaius Sollius Modestus Apollinaris SidoniusGaius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius
Avitus had two sons, Agricola (fl 455 – living 507, a vir illustris) and Ecdicius Avitus (later patricius and magister militum under Emperor Julius Nepos) and a daughter Papianilla; she married Sidonius Apollinaris, whose letters and panegyrics remain an important source for Avitus' life and times.
Sidonius married Papianilla, the daughter of Emperor Avitus, around 452.

Theodoric I

TheodoricTheodericusTheodoric I of the Ostrogoths
His relative Theodorus was hostage at the court of the King of Visigoths, Theodoric I.
The later Emperor Avitus visited Theodoric, lived at his court and taught his sons.

Majorian

Flavius Julius Valerius MajorianusJulius Majorianus AugustusMajorien
The new Emperor needed the support of both the civil institutions, the Roman senate and the Eastern Roman Emperor Marcian, as well as that of the army and its commanders (the generals Majorian and Ricimer) and the Vandals of Gaiseric.
A prominent general of the Late Roman army, Majorian deposed Emperor Avitus in 457 and succeeded him.

Agricola (consul 421)

AgricolaFlavius AgricolaJulius Agricola
His father was possibly Flavius Julius Agricola, consul in 421.
He was also a relative, perhaps even the father, of the Emperor Avitus (r. 455–456).

Flavius Aetius

AetiusAëtiusEzio
He then started a military career serving under the magister militum Aetius in his campaign against the Juthungi and the Norics (430–431) and against the Burgundians (436).
Aetius, with the help of the influential Gallo-Roman senator Avitus, convinced the Visigoths of king Theodoric I to join him against the external menace; he also succeeded in persuading Sambida (who was falsely accused of planning to join the Huns), the Armoricans, the Salian Franks, some of the Saxons, and the Burgundians of Sapaudia to join his forces.

Remistus

He probably travelled to Noricum to restore the imperial authority in that province, and then passed through Ravenna, where he left a Gothic force under the new patricius and magister militum Remistus, a Visigoth.
Remistus (died in Ravenna, September 17, 456) was a general of the Western Roman Empire, commander-in-chief of the army under Emperor Avitus.

Battle of the Catalaunian Plains

Battle of ChâlonsCatalaunian PlainsBattle of Chalons
Here he lived until 451 when the Huns, led by Attila, invaded the Western Roman Empire; Avitus persuaded Theodoric into an alliance with Rome, and the combined forces of Theodoric and Aetius defeated Attila in the Battle of Châlons; Theodoric died in the battle.
Allegedly, Theodoric learned how few troops Aetius had with him and decided it was wiser to wait and oppose the Huns in his own lands, so Aetius then turned to the former Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, Avitus, for help.

Ricimer

Flavius Ricimer
The new Emperor needed the support of both the civil institutions, the Roman senate and the Eastern Roman Emperor Marcian, as well as that of the army and its commanders (the generals Majorian and Ricimer) and the Vandals of Gaiseric. Avitus sent Ricimer to defend Sicily, and the Romans defeated the Vandals twice, once in a land battle near Agrigento and another in a naval battle off Corsica.
After the sack, the Visigothic King Theodoric II proclaimed as Emperor Avitus, the Roman military commander in Gaul.

Attila

Attila the HunEtzelAtli
Here he lived until 451 when the Huns, led by Attila, invaded the Western Roman Empire; Avitus persuaded Theodoric into an alliance with Rome, and the combined forces of Theodoric and Aetius defeated Attila in the Battle of Châlons; Theodoric died in the battle.
A mission by Avitus and Attila's continued westward advance convinced the Visigoth king Theodoric I (Theodorid) to ally with the Romans.

Praetorian prefecture of Gaul

praetorian prefect of GaulGaulprefecture of Gaul
In 439 he became Praetorian prefect of Gaul and renewed the friendship treaty with the Visigoths.
Avitus (c. 439)

Burgundians

BurgundianBurgundyBurgund
He then started a military career serving under the magister militum Aetius in his campaign against the Juthungi and the Norics (430–431) and against the Burgundians (436).
In 457, Ricimer overthrew another emperor, Avitus, raising Majorian to the throne.

Petronius Maximus

PetroniusFlavius Petronius MaximusMaximus
In the late spring of 455, Avitus was recalled to service by emperor Petronius Maximus and was elevated to the rank of magister militum, probably praesentalis; Maximus sent Avitus in an embassy to the court of Theodoric II, who had succeeded to his father, at Toulouse.
To further secure his position Maximus quickly appointed Avitus as magister militum and sent him on a mission to Toulouse to gain the support of the Visigoths.

Brioude

Avitus died in 457, or late in 456, very soon after his deposition, and was buried at Brioude, next to Saint Julian's tomb.
The emperor Avitus (acclaimed at Toulouse, died 456) had already been buried at the shrine of Julian at Brivas (Brioude), according to Gregory of Tours.

Marcian

Flavius MarcianByzantine emperor of that nameEmperor Marcianus
The new Emperor needed the support of both the civil institutions, the Roman senate and the Eastern Roman Emperor Marcian, as well as that of the army and its commanders (the generals Majorian and Ricimer) and the Vandals of Gaiseric.
Marcian did not recognize any Western Emperor after Valentinian, denying Maximus when he sent an embassy requesting it, and similarly refusing to recognize Avitus, who succeeded Maximus.

Agricola (vir inlustris)

Agricola
466–485) was a Arverni noble and son of the Western Roman Emperor Avitus.

Battle of Agrigentum (456)

AgrigentumBattle of Agrigentumland battle
Avitus sent Ricimer to defend Sicily, and the Romans defeated the Vandals twice, once in a land battle near Agrigento and another in a naval battle off Corsica.
Ricimer returned home to Italy where he and the generals Majorian and Aegidius, seized power from the Western Roman emperor, Avitus.

Clermont-Ferrand

ClermontClermont-Ferrand International Short Film FestivalClermont Ferrand
Avitus was born in Clermont to a family of the Gallo-Roman nobility.
Avitus (c. 385–after 17 October 456 or in 457), Western Roman Emperor from 8 or 9 July 455 to 17 October 456,

Iohannes (consul 456)

IohannesJohannes
However, his consulate sine collega (without a second Consul) was not recognised by the Eastern court, which nominated two consuls, Iohannes and Varanes.
Iohannes is known only through the inscriptions that recorded him as the Consul of year 456, when he was chosen by the Eastern court to hold this office together with Varanes; in the West, however, he was not recognised, as the consulate was held by Emperor Avitus.

Battle of Corsica

naval battleCorsicasea battle
Avitus sent Ricimer to defend Sicily, and the Romans defeated the Vandals twice, once in a land battle near Agrigento and another in a naval battle off Corsica.
The Vandals were defeated at Agrigentum by the Suebian warrior Ricimer, who was acting for Emperor Avitus, after which they sailed for Corsica.

Hydatius

Chronicle of HydatiusIdaciusIdatius
The contemporary historian Hydatius, who lived in Spain, considered the year 457 the third of Avitus' reign; Avitus' own intentions are not known, nor are the manner and date of his death, of which there are several versions.
This is especially true of the narrative climax of his account, the sack in 456 of the Suevi capital at Braga by the Visigothic king Theodoric II, acting in the service of the Roman emperor Avitus.