Awaji dialect

The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.wikipedia
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Banshū dialect

Banshū-ben
On the other hand, it bears little resemblance to the Banshū dialect, spoken right across the Akashi Strait from the island.
The Banshū area is also in contact with Awaji Island across the Akashi Strait, but that island's Awaji dialect shares common features instead with such as the Kishū and Awa dialects, and is quite distinct from Banshū.

Awaji Island

AwajiAwajishimaAwaji Island, Japan.
The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.

Sumoto, Hyōgo

SumotoGoshiki, HyōgoSumoto City
The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.

Minamiawaji

Minamiawaji, HyōgoMinami AwajiMinamiawaji City
The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.

Awaji, Hyōgo

AwajiAwaji, HyogoAwaji City
The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.

Hyōgo Prefecture

HyōgoHyogoHyogo Prefecture
The Awaji dialect, also called Awaji ben, is a dialect of Japanese spoken on Awaji Island (which comprises the cities of Sumoto, Minamiawaji, and Awaji) in the southern part of Hyōgo Prefecture.

Kansai region

KansaiKinkiKinki region
According to the introduction of "Comprehensive Study of the Kinki Region," a publication of the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL), titled "Subgroupings of the Kinki Dialects", the Awaji Dialect straddles the Central (typified by the pronunciation of the mora /se/ as [ɕe], use of the copula =ja, a distinction between the perfect and progressive aspects, and a migration of the monograde verb classes to the quadrigrade class) and Western Kansai dialect regions.

National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics

National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL)National Language Research Institute
According to the introduction of "Comprehensive Study of the Kinki Region," a publication of the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL), titled "Subgroupings of the Kinki Dialects", the Awaji Dialect straddles the Central (typified by the pronunciation of the mora /se/ as [ɕe], use of the copula =ja, a distinction between the perfect and progressive aspects, and a migration of the monograde verb classes to the quadrigrade class) and Western Kansai dialect regions.

Osaka

Osaka, JapanŌsakaOsaka, Osaka
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Kobe

Kobe, JapanKōbeKobe, Hyogo
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Wakayama (city)

WakayamaWakayama, WakayamaWakanoura Wan
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Osaka Bay

Bay of OsakaOsakaOsaka Bay Area
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Tokushima Prefecture

TokushimaTokushima-ken36
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Awa Province (Tokushima)

Awa ProvinceAwaA'''wa
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Edo period

Tokugawa periodEdo-periodEdo
The dialect shares many features with the dialects of the cities of Osaka, Kobe, and Wakayama, which is shares the Osaka Bay with, as well as with that of Tokushima Prefecture, which exercised control (as Awa Province) over Awaji Island during the feudal period.

Akashi Strait

On the other hand, it bears little resemblance to the Banshū dialect, spoken right across the Akashi Strait from the island.

Kawachi Province

KawachiKawachi no kuni
Tasuaki Negita in A Study of the Awaji Dialect (1986, ISBN: 978-4875216575) divides the Awaji dialect into Northern, Central, and Southern varieties, grouping the Northern Awaji dialect with that of the area of the former Kawachi and Yamato Provinces, Central Awaji with that of Izumi Province and Wakayama City, and Southern Awaji with that of Tokushima City.

Yamato Province

YamatoYamato plainYamato region
Tasuaki Negita in A Study of the Awaji Dialect (1986, ISBN: 978-4875216575) divides the Awaji dialect into Northern, Central, and Southern varieties, grouping the Northern Awaji dialect with that of the area of the former Kawachi and Yamato Provinces, Central Awaji with that of Izumi Province and Wakayama City, and Southern Awaji with that of Tokushima City.

Izumi Province

IzumiIzumi no kuniSenshu
Tasuaki Negita in A Study of the Awaji Dialect (1986, ISBN: 978-4875216575) divides the Awaji dialect into Northern, Central, and Southern varieties, grouping the Northern Awaji dialect with that of the area of the former Kawachi and Yamato Provinces, Central Awaji with that of Izumi Province and Wakayama City, and Southern Awaji with that of Tokushima City.

Tokushima (city)

TokushimaTokushima, TokushimaTokushima City
Tasuaki Negita in A Study of the Awaji Dialect (1986, ISBN: 978-4875216575) divides the Awaji dialect into Northern, Central, and Southern varieties, grouping the Northern Awaji dialect with that of the area of the former Kawachi and Yamato Provinces, Central Awaji with that of Izumi Province and Wakayama City, and Southern Awaji with that of Tokushima City.

Mukogawa Women's University

Mukogawa Fort Wright InstituteMukogowa Ft. Wright Institute
Yamamoto Toshiharu and Yuriko Iino in "The Dialects of Hyōgo: Their Distribution and Classification" (published in The Bulletin of Mukogawa Women's University, Vol.

Japanese pitch accent

pitch accentJapaneseKeihan type
The entire island uses a Keihan type (wordtone and accent) pitch accent system.

Kyoto

Kyoto, JapanKyōtoKyoto, Kyoto
Especially among the elderly and people living in remote areas, the traditional Keihan system (which has disappeared in Kyoto, Osaka, Kobe, and most of the rest of the Kansai Region) is still to be found.

Seto Inland Sea

Inland SeaHiro WanInland Sea of Japan
Yoichi Fujiwara noted in "Three Major Dialects of the Inland Sea Region" (part of Japanese Dialects of the Shōwa Period) that the vicinity of the former Ikuwa Village (now part of the Hokudan-chō Tsuna-gun area of Awaji City) had a H-L-H type intonation (e.g., dokomade it-temo ("wherever go.") would be pronounced dókòmádè ìttémò).

Shōwa (1926–1989)

Shōwa periodShōwaShōwa era
Yoichi Fujiwara noted in "Three Major Dialects of the Inland Sea Region" (part of Japanese Dialects of the Shōwa Period) that the vicinity of the former Ikuwa Village (now part of the Hokudan-chō Tsuna-gun area of Awaji City) had a H-L-H type intonation (e.g., dokomade it-temo ("wherever go.") would be pronounced dókòmádè ìttémò).