Awe

Awe is an emotion comparable to wonder but less joyous.wikipedia
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Emotion

emotionsemotionalemotional state
Awe is an emotion comparable to wonder but less joyous.
In addition to the original six, these studies provided evidence for amusement, awe, contentment, desire, embarrassment, pain, relief, and sympathy in both facial and vocal expressions.

Wonder (emotion)

wonderEnchantingWondering
Related concepts are wonder, admiration, elevation, and the sublime.
Wonder is also often compared to the emotion of awe but awe implies fear or respect rather than joy.

Sublime (philosophy)

sublimesublimitythe Sublime
Related concepts are wonder, admiration, elevation, and the sublime.
As such, the sublime inspires awe and veneration, with greater persuasive powers.

Contrasting and categorization of emotions

List of emotionsPlutchik's Wheel of Emotionscategorized
On Robert Plutchik's wheel of emotions awe is modeled as a combination of surprise and fear.

Admiration

admiremene
Related concepts are wonder, admiration, elevation, and the sublime.
Sara Algoe and Jonathan Haidt include admiration in the category of other-praising emotions, alongside awe, elevation, and gratitude.

Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
Keltner and Haidt propose that awe can have both positive and negative connotations, and that there are five additional features of awe that can color one’s experience of the emotion: threat, beauty, ability, virtue, and the supernatural.
He identifies the virtues as what he calls the good emotions "The first group consisting of love, kindness, joy, faith, awe and pity is good" These virtues differ from older accounts of the virtues because they are not character traits expressed by action, but emotions that are to be felt and developed by feeling not acting.

Joy

joyous
Awe is an emotion comparable to wonder but less joyous.

Surprise (emotion)

surpriseelement of surprisesurprisingly
On Robert Plutchik's wheel of emotions awe is modeled as a combination of surprise and fear.

Fear

terrorapprehensionfears
On Robert Plutchik's wheel of emotions awe is modeled as a combination of surprise and fear. Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Great Pyramid of Giza

Great PyramidPyramid of KhufuThe Great Pyramid of Giza
In general, awe is directed at objects considered to be more powerful than the subject, such as the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Grand Canyon, the vastness of the cosmos, or God.

Grand Canyon

The Grand CanyonGrand Canyon, ArizonaSouth Rim
In general, awe is directed at objects considered to be more powerful than the subject, such as the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Grand Canyon, the vastness of the cosmos, or God.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
In general, awe is directed at objects considered to be more powerful than the subject, such as the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Grand Canyon, the vastness of the cosmos, or God.

Positive psychology

positive psychologistpositivePositive psychological
Related concepts are wonder, admiration, elevation, and the sublime.

Neuropsychology

neuropsychologicalneuropsychologistneuropsychologists
In Awe: The Delights and Dangers of Our Eleventh Emotion, neuropsychologist and positive psychology guru Pearsall presents a phenomenological study of awe.

Love

Christian loveloving
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Sadness

sadsaddenedSorrow
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Embarrassment

embarrassingsocial awkwardnessembarrassed
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Curiosity

curiouscuriositiesinquisitiveness
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Pride

arrogancearrogantproud
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Happiness

happyenjoymentJolly
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Depression (mood)

depressiondepressedmelancholy
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Guilt (emotion)

guiltguiltycollective guilt
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Anger

wrathangryIrate
Pearsall sees awe as the 11th emotion, beyond those now scientifically accepted (i.e., love, fear, sadness, embarrassment, curiosity, pride, enjoyment, despair, guilt, and anger).” Most definitions allow for awe to be a positive or a negative experience, but when asked to describe events that elicit awe, most people only cite positive experiences.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development

theory of cognitive developmentsensorimotorsensorimotor stage
This primordial awe would have occurred only when the high-status person had characteristics of vastness (in size, fame, authority, or prestige) that required the low-status individual to engage in Piagetian accommodation (changing one’s mental representation of the world to accommodate the new experience).

Threat

threatsthreatenedthreatening communication
Keltner and Haidt propose that awe can have both positive and negative connotations, and that there are five additional features of awe that can color one’s experience of the emotion: threat, beauty, ability, virtue, and the supernatural.