Béla Bartók

BartókBartokBartók, BélaBela BartókBéla BartokBartókianBela BartokBéla Viktor János BartókBartokianBartòk
Béla Viktor János Bartók (Bartók Béla, ; 25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist, and ethnomusicologist.wikipedia
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Folk music

folkfolk songtraditional
Through his collection and analytical study of folk music, he was one of the founders of comparative musicology, which later became ethnomusicology.
For Scholes, as well as for Cecil Sharp and Béla Bartók, there was a sense of the music of the country as distinct from that of the town.

Ethnomusicology

ethnomusicologistethnomusicologistsethnomusicological
Béla Viktor János Bartók (Bartók Béla, ; 25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist, and ethnomusicologist.
Examples of such composers are Leoš Janáček, Edvard Grieg, Jean Sibelius, Béla Bartók, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

Franz Liszt Academy of Music

Franz Liszt AcademyLiszt AcademyLiszt Ferenc Academy of Music
From 1899 to 1903, Bartók studied piano under István Thomán, a former student of Franz Liszt, and composition under János Koessler at the Royal Academy of Music in Budapest.
The inside of the building is decorated with frescoes, Zsolnay ceramics, and several statues (among them that of Béla Bartók and Frédéric Chopin).

István Thomán

From 1899 to 1903, Bartók studied piano under István Thomán, a former student of Franz Liszt, and composition under János Koessler at the Royal Academy of Music in Budapest.
He was a notable piano teacher, with students including Béla Bartók, Ernő Dohnányi and Georges Cziffra.

String Quartet No. 1 (Bartók)

String Quartet No. 1First String QuartetString Quartet No.1
The first piece to show clear signs of this new interest is the String Quartet No. 1 in A minor (1908), which contains folk-like elements.
1''' in A minor by Béla Bartók was completed in 1909.

Bluebeard's Castle

Duke Bluebeard's CastleBluebeard’s CastleBluebeard
In 1911, Bartók wrote what was to be his only opera, Bluebeard's Castle, dedicated to Márta.
Bluebeard's Castle (A kékszakállú herceg vára; literally: The Blue-Bearded Duke's Castle) is a one-act expressionist opera by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók.

György Sándor

Gyorgy SandorGyorgy SandòrGyörgy Sandor
Among his notable students were Fritz Reiner, Sir Georg Solti, György Sándor, Ernő Balogh, and Lili Kraus.
He studied at the Liszt Academy in Budapest under Béla Bartók and Zoltán Kodály, and debuted as a performer in 1930.

Ditta Pásztory-Bartók

Ditta Pásztory
Two months after his divorce, he married Ditta Pásztory (1903–1982), a piano student, ten days after proposing to her.
Ditta Pásztory-Bartók (31 October 1903 – 21 November 1982) was a Hungarian pianist and the second wife of the composer Béla Bartók.

Fritz Reiner

Reiner
Among his notable students were Fritz Reiner, Sir Georg Solti, György Sándor, Ernő Balogh, and Lili Kraus.
During his last two years there, his piano teacher was the young Béla Bartók.

Ernő Balogh

Balogh, ErnőErnö Balogh
Among his notable students were Fritz Reiner, Sir Georg Solti, György Sándor, Ernő Balogh, and Lili Kraus.
His teachers included Béla Bartók for piano and Zoltán Kodály for composition, the two subjects in which he won the Franz Liszt Prize.

Zoltán Kodály

KodályKodály, ZoltánKodaly
There he met Zoltán Kodály, who made a strong impression on him and became a lifelong friend and colleague.
At around this time Kodály met fellow composer and compatriot Béla Bartók, whom he took under his wing and introduced to some of the methods involved in folk song collecting.

Jack Beeson

Jack Hamilton Beeson
After Bartók moved to the United States, he taught Jack Beeson and Violet Archer.
From 1944 to 1945 he had private studies with Béla Bartók in New York City.

Vynohradiv

NagyszőllősVeľká SevljušNagyszőlős
His mother then took him and his sister, Erzsébet, to live in Nagyszőlős (today Vynohradiv, Ukraine) and then to Pozsony (present-day Bratislava, Slovakia).

The Wooden Prince

The outbreak of World War I forced him to stop the expeditions, but he returned to composing with a ballet called The Wooden Prince (1914–16) and the String Quartet No. 2 in (1915–17), both influenced by Debussy.
13, Sz. 60, is a one-act pantomime ballet composed by Béla Bartók in 1914–1916 (orchestrated 1916–1917) to a scenario by Béla Balázs.

String Quartet No. 2 (Bartók)

String Quartet No. 2String Quartet No.2
The outbreak of World War I forced him to stop the expeditions, but he returned to composing with a ballet called The Wooden Prince (1914–16) and the String Quartet No. 2 in (1915–17), both influenced by Debussy.
2''' by Béla Bartók was written between 1915 and October 1917 in Rákoskeresztúr in Hungary.

Claude Debussy

DebussyC. DebussyDebussy, Claude
The outbreak of World War I forced him to stop the expeditions, but he returned to composing with a ballet called The Wooden Prince (1914–16) and the String Quartet No. 2 in (1915–17), both influenced by Debussy. From 1907, he also began to be influenced by the French composer Claude Debussy, whose compositions Kodály had brought back from Paris.
His works have strongly influenced a wide range of composers including Béla Bartók, Olivier Messiaen, George Benjamin, and the jazz pianist and composer Bill Evans.

The Miraculous Mandarin

Miraculous Mandarinle Mandarin merveilleux
Bartók's libretto for The Miraculous Mandarin, another ballet, was influenced by Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg and Richard Strauss.
19, Sz. 73 (BB 82), is a one act pantomime ballet composed by Béla Bartók between 1918–1924, and based on the story by Melchior Lengyel.

String Quartet No. 4 (Bartók)

String Quartet No. 4Fourth Quartetfourth
In 1927–28, Bartók wrote his Third and Fourth String Quartets, after which his compositions demonstrated his mature style.
4''' by Béla Bartók was written from July to September 1928 in Budapest.

Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta

Music for Strings, Percussion, and CelestaMusic for Strings Percussion and CelestaMusic for Strings, Percussion and Celeste
Notable examples of this period are Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1936) and Divertimento for String Orchestra (1939).
106, BB 114 is one of the best-known compositions by the Hungarian composer Béla Bartók.

String Quartet No. 3 (Bartók)

String Quartet No. 3ThirdString Quartet No.3
In 1927–28, Bartók wrote his Third and Fourth String Quartets, after which his compositions demonstrated his mature style.
"String Quartet No. 3" by Béla Bartók was written in September 1927 in Budapest.

Divertimento for String Orchestra (Bartók)

Divertimento for String OrchestraDivertimentoDivertimento for Strings
Notable examples of this period are Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1936) and Divertimento for String Orchestra (1939).
Divertimento for String Orchestra Sz.113 BB.118 is a three-movement work composed by Béla Bartók in 1939, scored for full orchestral strings.

Violet Archer

Archer, Violet
After Bartók moved to the United States, he taught Jack Beeson and Violet Archer.
She travelled to New York City in the summer of 1942 where she studied with Béla Bartók, "who introduced her to Hungarian folk tunes and to variation technique. She taught at the McGill Conservatory from 1944–1947. Later in the 1940s she studied with Paul Hindemith at Yale. She earned a B MUS from Yale in 1948, and a M MUS also from Yale in 1949. From 1950–1953 Archer was Composer-in-Residence at the University of North Texas. From 1953 through 1961 she taught at the University of Oklahoma. Returning to Canada in 1961 for doctoral study at the University of Toronto, she set that aside when, in 1962, she joined the Faculty of Music at the University of Alberta. There she would become chairman of the Theory and Composition Department. She remained at the University of Alberta until her retirement. Her notable students include Larry Austin, Jan Randall, Allan Gilliland, and Allan Gordon Bell.

String Quartet No. 5 (Bartók)

String Quartet No. 5Fifth String Quartetfifth
The Fifth String Quartet was composed in 1934, and the Sixth String Quartet (his last) in 1939.
102, BB 110 by Béla Bartók was written between 6 August and 6 September 1934.

Music of Bulgaria

BulgarianBulgarian musicBulgarian folk music
He was especially fond of the asymmetrical dance rhythms and pungent harmonies found in Bulgarian music.
Bulgarian folk music is known for its asymmetrical rhythms (defined by the famous Hungarian composer and ethnomusicologist Béla Bartók as "Bulgarian rhythms"), where meter is not split in even beats, but in combinations of short (2 metric units) and long (3 metric units) beats, corresponding to the dancers' short and long steps.

Lili Kraus

Among his notable students were Fritz Reiner, Sir Georg Solti, György Sándor, Ernő Balogh, and Lili Kraus.
She enrolled at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, and at the age of 17 entered the Budapest Conservatory where she studied with Zoltán Kodály, and Béla Bartók.