B-Netzwikipedia
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

Mobile radio telephone

mobile radio telephone0Gmanual mobile telephone system
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

C-Netz

C-Net C450C-4501G cell phones (C-Netz)
The B-Netz would eventually be superseded by the technically superior C-Netz, which was put into operation on May 1, 1985.
It utilized the C450 standard and was the third and last update of a series of analog mobile phone systems used primarily within Germany, superseding the B-Netz and the A-Netz before it. It has been decommissioned, replaced by both the newer D-Netz (GSM-900) and E-Netz (GSM-1800) systems.

Mobile telephony

mobile telephonymobile communicationmobile communications
Although this non-cellular service, based on German B-Netz technology, was expanded rapidly throughout the UK between 1982 and 1985 and continued in operation for several years before finally closing in Scotland, it was overtaken by the introduction in January 1985 of two cellular systems - the British Telecom/Securicor 'Cellnet' service and the Racal/Millicom/Barclays 'Vodafone' (from voice + data + phone) service.

History of mobile phones

first handheld mobile phone callanalog mobile phoneearly days of mobile telephony
In 1972 this was displaced by B-Netz which connected calls automatically.

Freenet (radio)

Freenet
It was originally introduced in 1996 as a product name of Motorola and uses part of the frequency spectrum of the former B-Netz carphone network.

Personal radio service

personal radio service
The Freenet allocation is a re-purposing of the old B-Netz mobile telephone service.

Analog signal

analoganalog signalanalogue
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

Deutsche Bundespost

German Federal Post OfficeGerman Post Officepostal service
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

Germany

GermanGermanyGermans
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

West Germany

West GermanFederal Republic of GermanyGermany
B-Netz was an analog, commercial mobile radio telephone network that was operated by the Deutsche Bundespost in Germany (at first only West Germany) from 1972 until 1994.

Austria

AUTAustriaAustrian
The system was also implemented in neighboring countries Austria, The Netherlands and Luxembourg. At its height in 1986, the network had 158 base stations and about 27,000 subscribers in Germany and 1,770 in Austria.

Netherlands

Dutchthe NetherlandsNL
The system was also implemented in neighboring countries Austria, The Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Luxembourg

LuxembourgGrand Duchy of LuxembourgLuxemburg
The system was also implemented in neighboring countries Austria, The Netherlands and Luxembourg.

Communication channel

channelcommunication channelchannels
The frequency plan originally included only 38 channels (with one call possible per frequency channel), but it was upgraded to incorporate the A-Netz frequencies when that network was retired in 1980.

Frequency

frequencyfrequenciesperiod
The frequency plan originally included only 38 channels (with one call possible per frequency channel), but it was upgraded to incorporate the A-Netz frequencies when that network was retired in 1980.

Handset

handsettelephone handsethandset receiver
A major limitation of system was that, in order to reach a subscriber, one had to know his location since the handset would assume the local area code of the base station serving it. Handoff was not possible and calls were dropped when cells were switched.

Telephone numbering plan

Area codeCalling codearea codes
A major limitation of system was that, in order to reach a subscriber, one had to know his location since the handset would assume the local area code of the base station serving it. Handoff was not possible and calls were dropped when cells were switched.

Handover

handoverhandoffhanded over
A major limitation of system was that, in order to reach a subscriber, one had to know his location since the handset would assume the local area code of the base station serving it. Handoff was not possible and calls were dropped when cells were switched.

Mobile phone signal

dropped calldroppeddead zones
A major limitation of system was that, in order to reach a subscriber, one had to know his location since the handset would assume the local area code of the base station serving it. Handoff was not possible and calls were dropped when cells were switched.

Roaming

roamingroaminternational roaming
Roaming was possible between the implementing countries.

Base station

base stationbase stationsradio base station
At its height in 1986, the network had 158 base stations and about 27,000 subscribers in Germany and 1,770 in Austria.

West Berlin

West BerlinWestBerlin
At the end of 1988, there were 1,078 participants in West Berlin alone.

Erlang (unit)

Erlangblockingblocking probability
The network was vastly oversubscribed and finding an available channel could prove difficult.