BIND

BIND 9GeoDNSBerkeley Internet Name DomainBerkeley Internet Name Domain ServerBind9ISC BINDnamed (computing)
BIND, or named (pronounced name-dee, short for name daemon: ), is the most widely used Domain Name System (DNS) software on the Internet.wikipedia
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Domain Name System

DNSresource recorddomain
BIND, or named (pronounced name-dee, short for name daemon: ), is the most widely used Domain Name System (DNS) software on the Internet.
In 1984, four UC Berkeley students, Douglas Terry, Mark Painter, David Riggle, and Songnian Zhou, wrote the first Unix name server implementation for the Berkeley Internet Name Domain, commonly referred to as BIND.

Zone file

zone data in anything other than flat text fileszonefile
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.
This format was originally used by the Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND) software package, but has been widely adopted by other DNS server software – though some of them (e.g. NSD, PowerDNS) are using the zone files only as a starting point to compile them into database format, see also Microsoft DNS with Active Directory-database integration.

Internet Systems Consortium

ISCInternet Software ConsortiumInternet Systems Consortium (ISC)
Starting in 2009, the Internet Software Consortium (ISC) developed a new software suite, initially called BIND10.
ISC has developed several key Internet technologies that enable the global Internet, including: BIND, ISC DHCP and Kea.

Nsupdate

Important features of BIND 9 include: TSIG, nsupdate, IPv6, rndc (remote name daemon control), views, multiprocessor support, Response Rate Limiting (RRL), DNSSEC, and broad portability.
BIND 8 and later supports this feature.

Rewrite (programming)

rewritecomplete rewritemajor rewrite
BIND 9 was a complete rewrite, in part to mitigate these ongoing security issues.
BIND (1)

DNS management software

DNS management software
The way to register them was by email and the way to publish them was BIND.

Nominum

Version 9 was developed by Nominum, Inc. under an ISC outsourcing contract, and the first version was released October 9, 2000.
Nominum was founded in 1999 to develop BIND 9 and ISC DHCP3 for the Internet Systems Consortium (ISC).

Paul Vixie

Paul Vixie started maintaining it in 1988 while working for Digital Equipment Corporation.
BIND

ISC license

ISCISC-licensedISC-style
Originally used for ISC software such as BIND and dig, it has become the preferred license for contributions to OpenBSD and the default license for npm packages.

Domain Name System Security Extensions

DNSSECstub resolverdeployment of DNSSEC at the root zone
It was written from scratch in part to address the architectural difficulties with auditing the earlier BIND code bases, and also to support DNSSEC (DNS Security Extensions).
To use DLV, a validator that supports it is needed, such as BIND or Unbound, configured with a trust anchor for a DLV zone.

Name server

domain name serverauthoritative name servernameserver
BIND

Daemon (computing)

daemondaemonsservices
BIND, or named (pronounced name-dee, short for name daemon: ), is the most widely used Domain Name System (DNS) software on the Internet.

Unix-like

*nixUnixlike
On Unix-like operating systems it is the de facto standard.

De facto standard

de facto'' standardde factode facto'' standards
On Unix-like operating systems it is the de facto standard.

University of California, Berkeley

BerkeleyUC BerkeleyUniversity of California
The software was originally designed at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) in the early 1980s. Originally written by four graduate students at the Computer Systems Research Group at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), BIND was first released with Berkeley Software Distribution 4.3BSD.

TSIG

Important features of BIND 9 include: TSIG, nsupdate, IPv6, rndc (remote name daemon control), views, multiprocessor support, Response Rate Limiting (RRL), DNSSEC, and broad portability.

IPv6

Internet Protocol version 6dual-stackstateless address autoconfiguration
Important features of BIND 9 include: TSIG, nsupdate, IPv6, rndc (remote name daemon control), views, multiprocessor support, Response Rate Limiting (RRL), DNSSEC, and broad portability.

Shared secret

share a secretshared session secret
rndc enables remote configuration updates, using a shared secret to provide encryption for local and remote terminals during each session.

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol

LDAPDistinguished Nameattribute in LDAP
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.

Berkeley DB

BDBBerkeley DatabaseBerkeleyDB
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.

PostgreSQL

PostgresJSONBlibpq
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.

MySQL

M'''ySQLMySQL 4.1MySQL 4.x
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.

Open Database Connectivity

ODBCdatabase driverdriver
While earlier versions of BIND offered no mechanism to store and retrieve zone data in anything other than flat text files, in 2007 BIND 9.4 DLZ provided a compile-time option for zone storage in a variety of database formats including LDAP, Berkeley DB, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and ODBC.

Postgraduate education

postgraduategraduate studentpost-graduate
Originally written by four graduate students at the Computer Systems Research Group at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), BIND was first released with Berkeley Software Distribution 4.3BSD.