Bachelor of Science

A Bachelor of Science (BS, '''B.Sc.

- Bachelor of Science

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Walsh School of Foreign Service

School of international relations at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. It is considered to be one of the world's leading international affairs schools, granting degrees at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

School of international relations at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. It is considered to be one of the world's leading international affairs schools, granting degrees at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

Healy Hall in Georgetown's Main Campus in Washington, D.C.
Bill Clinton, class of 1968, ran for student council president his senior year.

It offers an undergraduate program based in the liberal arts, which leads to the Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service (BSFS) degree, as well as eight interdisciplinary graduate programs.

Coat of Arms

London School of Economics

Public research university located in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London.

Public research university located in London, England, and a constituent college of the federal University of London.

Coat of Arms
Beatrice and Sidney Webb
Friedrich Hayek, who taught at LSE during the 1930s and 1940s
Stonework featuring the initials of LSE
Nemat Shafik is the director of LSE
The World Turned Upside Down. The island of Taiwan is coloured differently from mainland China
Old Building
Centre Building, opened in 2019
32 Lincoln's Inn Fields houses the Department of Economics and the International Growth Centre
The New Academic Building houses the LSE Law School
The 16th-century Old Curiosity Shop is now owned (freehold) and managed by the LSE
LSE Campus as viewed from the terrace of the New Academic Building in January 2018, showing the Centre Building's redevelopment and the demolition of 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields
The George IV, a pub owned by LSE
Sir John Ashworth
Craig Calhoun
LSE's "red block" logo
St Clement's Building
John Watkins Plaza at the London School of Economics
Houghton Street is the centre of the LSE campus
The interior of the main LSE library, designed by Norman Foster
Nelson Mandela arriving at LSE in 2000 to deliver a public lecture
LSE students revising in Lincoln's Inn Fields
Northumberland House
Grosvenor House Studios
Clement Attlee, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1945–1951)
Jomo Kenyatta, President of Kenya (1964–1978)
Mwai Kibaki, 3rd President of Kenya (2002–2013)
Romano Prodi, Prime Minister of Italy (1996–1998; 2006–2008) and President of the European Commission (1999–2004)
B. R. Ambedkar, Member of the Constituent Assembly of India (1946–1950) and Chairman of the Drafting Committee of the Constitution of India (1947–1950)
Pierre Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada (1968–1979; 1980–1984)
Lee Kuan Yew{{NoteTag|Attended; did not graduate.}}, Prime Minister of Singapore (1959–1990)
Queen Margrethe II of Denmark (1972–present)
Kim Campbell, Prime Minister of Canada (1993)
Heinrich Brüning, Chancellor of Germany (1930–1932)
Karl Popper, reader in logic and scientific method at the LSE
George Soros, billionaire investor, philanthropist and political activist
Tsai Ing-wen, President of Taiwan (2016–present)
Tony Fernandes, chief executive officer of the low-cost carrier, AirAsia
Carlo Cottarelli, Director of the Financial Bureau of the International Monetary Fund (2008–2013)
Kamisese Mara, founding father and Prime Minister of Fiji (1970–1987; 1987–1992)
Sher Bahadur Deuba, Prime Minister of Nepal (1995–1997; 2001–2002; 2004–2005; 2017–2018; 2021–present)
Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission (2019–present)
Anthony Kennedy, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1988–2018), spent a year at the LSE.
Leonid Hurwicz – Nobel laureate in Economics – studied at LSE with Nicholas Kaldor and Hayek
Ronald Coase – awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1991
Christopher A. Pissarides – awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2010 – currently Regius Professor of Economics at LSE
Amartya Sen, Indian economist, former professor and Nobel laureate
Juan Manuel Santos, former president of Colombia and recipient of the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize

The University of London degrees of BSc (Econ) and DSc (Econ) were established in 1901, the first university degrees dedicated to the social sciences.

Haas School of Business

Business school of the University of California, Berkeley.

Business school of the University of California, Berkeley.

The western entrance
The eastern entrance, across from the California Memorial Stadium

The Haas School of Business, in conjunction with the main UC Berkeley campus, offers an undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration (BSBA).

Bachelor's degree

Undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to six years (depending on institution and academic discipline).

Undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to six years (depending on institution and academic discipline).

The two most common bachelor's degrees are the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and the Bachelor of Science (BS or BSc).

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate program in the arts, or, in some cases, other disciplines.

Bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate program in the arts, or, in some cases, other disciplines.

The internet and online space have also moved away from the liberal arts focus on Bachelor of arts programs towards the types of disciplines found and focused in the Bachelor of Science.

University of Michigan

Public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

University of Michigan (1855) Jasper Francis Cropsey
Alexander J. Davis's original University of Michigan designs featured the Gothic Revival style. Davis himself is generally credited with coining the term "Collegiate Gothic."
Andrew Dickson White, founder and first president of Cornell University and among the earliest benefactors of Michigan, joined the Michigan faculty in 1858. He made his lasting mark on the grounds of the university by enrolling students to plant elms along the walkways on The Diag, resembling the "glorious elms" of Yale.
Physicists George Uhlenbeck, Hendrik Kramers, and Samuel Goudsmit circa 1928 at Michigan.
John Dewey, founder of the University of Chicago Laboratory School
Earl V. Moore Building on North Campus
University of Michigan Golf Course was designed by Scottish golf course architect Alister MacKenzie and opened in 1931.
Samuel Trask Dana Building (West Medical Building) houses the School for Environment and Sustainability
The Thomas Henry Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research was constructed in 1924 as the result of a donation from the widow of iron magnate Thomas H. Simpson, in memory of her late husband, who had died of pernicious anemia
West Hall at the Southeast corner of the Diag
Law Quadrangle, constructed during the decade of 1923–33, was designed by York and Sawyer in the Tudor style recalled the quadrangles of the two English ancient universities Oxford and Cambridge
Statue of Portia, above the front entrance to the Martha Cook Residence Hall
Lawyers Club Dining Hall
Betsy Barbour Residence Hall, one of three all-female residence halls on campus, was designed by Albert Kahn in the English Georgian style.
Stockwell Residence Hall
Michigan Union, an Art Deco building constructed on land wholly owned by the student society in 1917, was designed by Michigan alumni Irving Kane Pond and Allen Bartlit Pond.
Delta Sigma Delta, the first dental fraternity in the world
Phi Delta Phi, the oldest legal organization in continuous existence in the United States.
The archway to the Law Quadrangle
Burgee of University of Michigan
Newberry Hall (Kelsey Museum of Archeology)
Alice Freeman Palmer (A.B. 1876, Ph.D. Hon 1882)
14th President of Yale University James Rowland Angell, an early proponent of eugenics, graduated from Michigan in 1890. His father, James Burrill Angell, was president of Michigan from 1871 to 1909.
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States William Rufus Day (B.S.)
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States George Alexander Sutherland
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States William Francis Murphy (J.D. 1914)
United States Secretary of Agriculture Julius Sterling Morton (B.A.)
Puisne justice of the Supreme Court of Canada David Mills (LAW: LLB 1867)
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines Maria Lourdes Sereno (LLM)
38th President of the United States Gerald Rudolph Ford Jr. (B. A. 1935, HLLD 1974)
British politician George Mark Malloch Brown, Baron Malloch-Brown (MA)
British politician Howard Emerson Flight, Baron Flight (BUS: MBA)
33rd Governor of Michigan William Alfred Comstock
Edward Wood (HLLD 1944), 1st Earl of Halifax
Haile Selassie I (HDCL 1954), Emperor of Ethiopia
Sukarno (HDCL 1956), First President of Indonesia
Queen Juliana (HDCL 1965), Queen of the Netherlands
Nelson Mandela (HLLD 1987), Father of the Nation for South Africa
Elie Wiesel (HDHL 1992), Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize in 1986

The University of Michigan conferred the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1855, four years after the Lawrence Scientific School at Cambridge conferred the degree in 1851, for the first time in the United States, making Michigan the second institution in the country to confer the degree.

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University of Oxford

Collegiate research university in Oxford, England.

Collegiate research university in Oxford, England.

Coat of arms
Coat of arms
Balliol College, one of the university's oldest constituent colleges
Aerial view of Merton College's Mob Quad, the oldest quadrangle of the university, constructed in the years from 1288 to 1378
In 1605 Oxford was still a walled city, but several colleges had been built outside the city walls (north is at the bottom on this map).
An engraving of Christ Church, Oxford, 1742
Atrium of the Chemistry Research Laboratory, where the university has invested heavily in new facilities in recent years
The Sheldonian Theatre, built by Sir Christopher Wren between 1664 and 1668, hosts the university's Congregation, as well as concerts and degree ceremonies.
Summer in the Botanic Garden
Wellington Square, the name of which has become synonymous with the university's central administration
Tom Quad, Christ Church
Main Quad, Worcester College
Dining hall at Christ Church. The hall is an important feature of the typical Oxford college, providing a place to both dine and socialise.
Percentage of state-school students at Oxford and Cambridge
Rhodes House – home to the awarding body for the Rhodes Scholarships, often considered to be the world's most prestigious scholarship
The Clarendon Building is home to many senior Bodleian Library staff and previously housed the university's own central administration.
Duke Humfrey's Library in the Bodleian Library
The interior of the Pitt Rivers Museum
An undergraduate student at the University of Oxford in subfusc for matriculation
Rowing at Summer Eights, an annual intercollegiate bumps race
The Oxford Union's debating chamber
Tom Quad, Christ Church

This concept of a Bachelor of Science had been adopted at other European universities (London University had implemented it in 1860) but an 1880 proposal at Oxford to replace the classical requirement with a modern language (like German or French) was unsuccessful.

UC Berkeley College of Letters and Science

Largest of the 14 colleges at the University of California, Berkeley and encompasses the liberal arts.

Largest of the 14 colleges at the University of California, Berkeley and encompasses the liberal arts.

The College of Letters and Science awards only Bachelor of Arts degrees at the undergraduate level, in contrast to the other schools and colleges of UC Berkeley which award only Bachelor of Science degrees at the undergraduate level.

The original College of Agriculture consisted of the Hilgard, Wellman, and Giannini halls. Today, Rausser has expanded to occupy the Koshland, Morgan, and Mulford buildings.

Rausser College of Natural Resources

Oldest college in the University of California system (UC) and home to several internationally top-ranked programs.

Oldest college in the University of California system (UC) and home to several internationally top-ranked programs.

The original College of Agriculture consisted of the Hilgard, Wellman, and Giannini halls. Today, Rausser has expanded to occupy the Koshland, Morgan, and Mulford buildings.

1) Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE) researches global food production, nutrition and health, development economics, climate change, environmental economics, applied econometrics, policy evaluation, energy economics, natural resource economics, and international trade. Admissions to ARE's graduate program are highly competitive, with an acceptance rate of 8.8%. ARE offers one undergraduate major, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Environmental Economics and Policy (EEP). Admissions to EEP are capped. ARE is chaired by David Sunding.

China

Country in East Asia.

Country in East Asia.

China (today's Guangdong), Mangi (inland of Xanton), and Cataio (inland of China and Chequan, and including the capital Cambalu, Xandu, and a marble bridge) are all shown as separate regions on this 1570 map by Abraham Ortelius
10,000 years old pottery, Xianren Cave culture (18000–7000 BCE)
Yinxu, the ruins of the capital of the late Shang dynasty (14th century BCE)
China's first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, is famed for having united the Warring States' walls to form the Great Wall of China. Most of the present structure, however, dates to the Ming dynasty.
Map showing the expansion of Han dynasty in the 2nd century BC
The Tang dynasty at its greatest extent
199x199px
The Qing conquest of the Ming and expansion of the empire
The Eight-Nation Alliance invaded China to defeat the anti-foreign Boxers and their Qing backers. The image shows a celebration ceremony inside the Chinese imperial palace, the Forbidden City after the signing of the Boxer Protocol in 1901.
Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of Republic of China, one of the first republics in Asia.
Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong toasting together in 1945 following the end of World War II
Mao Zedong proclaiming the establishment of the PRC in 1949.
The 1989 Tiananmen Square protests was ended by a military-led massacre which brought condemnations and sanctions against the Chinese government from various foreign countries.
Satellite image of China from NASA WorldWind
Köppen-Geiger climate classification map for mainland China.
A giant panda, China's most famous endangered and endemic species, at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Sichuan
The Three Gorges Dam is the largest hydroelectric dam in the world.
Earliest known written formula for gunpowder, from the Wujing Zongyao of 1044 CE
Huawei headquarters in Shenzhen. Huawei is the world's largest telecoms-equipment-maker and the second-largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world.
Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, one of the first Chinese spaceports
Internet penetration rates in China in the context of East Asia and Southeast Asia, 1995–2012
The Duge Bridge is the highest bridge in the world.
The Beijing Daxing International Airport features the world's largest single-building airport terminal.
The Port of Shanghai's deep water harbor on Yangshan Island in the Hangzhou Bay is the world's busiest container port since 2010.
A 2009 population density map of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. The eastern coastal provinces are much more densely populated than the western interior.
Ethnolinguistic map of China
A trilingual sign in Sibsongbanna, with Tai Lü language on the top
Map of the ten largest cities in China (2010)
Beijing's Peking University, one of the top-ranked universities in China
Chart showing the rise of China's Human Development Index from 1970 to 2010
Geographic distribution of religions in China.  
 Chinese folk religion (including Confucianism, Taoism, and groups of Chinese Buddhism)
 Buddhism tout court
 Islam
 Ethnic minorities' indigenous religions
 Mongolian folk religion
 Northeast China folk religion influenced by Tungus and Manchu shamanism; widespread Shanrendao
Fenghuang County, an ancient town that harbors many architectural remains of Ming and Qing styles.
A Moon gate in a Chinese garden.
The stories in Journey to the West are common themes in Peking opera.
Map showing major regional cuisines of China
Go is an abstract strategy board game for two players, in which the aim is to surround more territory than the opponent and was invented in China more than 2,500 years ago.
Long March 2F launching Shenzhou spacecraft. China is one of the only three countries with independent human spaceflight capability.
Lihaozhai High School in Jianshui, Yunnan. The sign is in Hani (Latin alphabet), Nisu (Yi script), and Chinese.

China is developing its education system with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); in 2009, China graduated over 10,000 PhD engineers, and as many as 500,000 BSc graduates, more than any other country.