Back to the Future: The Ride

Back to the FutureBack to the Future - The RideBack to the Future Ridemotion-simulation rideThe Ridetheme park ride
Back to the Future: The Ride was a simulator ride at Universal Studios theme parks.wikipedia
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Universal Studios Florida

Universal StudiosFloridaOrlando
It was previously located at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood, where it has since been replaced by The Simpsons Ride and at Universal Studios Japan where it has since been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.
Steven Spielberg helped create E.T. Adventure and was a creative consultant for Back to the Future: The Ride, Twister...Ride it Out, An American Tail Theatre, Jaws, Men in Black: Alien Attack and Transformers: The Ride.

The Simpsons Ride

The Simpsons'' Ride
It was previously located at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood, where it has since been replaced by The Simpsons Ride and at Universal Studios Japan where it has since been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.
It was first announced in 2007 and replaced Back to the Future: The Ride at both locations.

Universal Studios Hollywood

Universal StudiosHollywoodUniversal
It was previously located at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood, where it has since been replaced by The Simpsons Ride and at Universal Studios Japan where it has since been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem. The idea of a Back to the Future–based ride was first discussed in a 1986 meeting between Steven Spielberg and MCA Planning and Development's Peter N. Alexander on the Universal Studios Hollywood backlot on the eve of the debut of the King Kong Encounter scene for the park's Studio Tour.
In 1993, Back to the Future: The Ride opened, replacing Battle of Galactica.

Simulator ride

dynamicmotion simulatormotion simulator ride
Back to the Future: The Ride was a simulator ride at Universal Studios theme parks.
This first ride was soon followed by the Back to the Future-themed Back to the Future: The Ride, which opened in 1991 at Universal Studios Florida and was removed in 2007 to make way for The Simpsons Ride.

Despicable Me Minion Mayhem

Despicable Me'' themed attractionDespicable Me: Minion Mayhem 3DMinion Mayhem
It was previously located at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood, where it has since been replaced by The Simpsons Ride and at Universal Studios Japan where it has since been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.
The attraction replaced Jimmy Neutron's Nicktoon Blast (Before Jimmy Neutron's Nicktoon Blast, that space was The Funtastic World of Hanna-Barbera) in Florida, T2-3D: Battle Across Time in Hollywood, and Back to the Future: The Ride in Japan.

Universal Creative

MCA Planning and DevelopmentMCA Recreation ServicesUniversal
The idea of a Back to the Future–based ride was first discussed in a 1986 meeting between Steven Spielberg and MCA Planning and Development's Peter N. Alexander on the Universal Studios Hollywood backlot on the eve of the debut of the King Kong Encounter scene for the park's Studio Tour.

Universal Studios Japan

JapanUSJOsaka
It was previously located at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood, where it has since been replaced by The Simpsons Ride and at Universal Studios Japan where it has since been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.
Back to the Future - The Ride has been replaced by Despicable Me Minion Mayhem.

Totally Fun Company

Peter N. Alexander
The idea of a Back to the Future–based ride was first discussed in a 1986 meeting between Steven Spielberg and MCA Planning and Development's Peter N. Alexander on the Universal Studios Hollywood backlot on the eve of the debut of the King Kong Encounter scene for the park's Studio Tour.
Working with Bob Ward, he created Kongfrontation, and E.T. Adventure and Back to the Future: The Ride with Steven Spielberg.

Back to the Future

film of the same namefirst filmoriginal film
As a result, in February 2009, Universal included all of the queue, pre-show and ride footage on the 2009 DVD re-release of Back to the Future as part of a second bonus disc.
The film began a franchise including two sequels, Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990), an animated series, theme park ride, and several video games.

Studio Tour

Universal Studios Backlot Tourtram tourUniversal Studios Tour
The idea of a Back to the Future–based ride was first discussed in a 1986 meeting between Steven Spielberg and MCA Planning and Development's Peter N. Alexander on the Universal Studios Hollywood backlot on the eve of the debut of the King Kong Encounter scene for the park's Studio Tour.
It was replaced in 1992 by the foundations of Back to the Future: The Ride.

Biff Tannen

Biffowning an automotive detailing business
The ride's story centered on a first-person adventure in pursuit of Biff Tannen through time.

Christopher Lloyd

Lloyd, Christopher
In commemoration of its final month of operation, a special event was held with Christopher Lloyd and Bob Gale beginning the countdown to the ride's closure in early August 2007. Also, in the line satirical video, an animated Doc Brown (voiced by Christopher Lloyd) attempts to borrow money from a loan office to save the Institute of Future Technology.

Darlene Vogel

Darlene Vogel starred as Heather, a receptionist for the Institute of Future Technology (IFT).
Vogel's first feature film was the 1989 science fiction film, Back to the Future Part II and as the IFT intern in the pre-show segment for 1991 film ride, Back to the Future: The Ride for the Universal movie parks.

Emmett Brown

Doc BrownDr. Emmett BrownEmmett "Doc" Brown
Also, in the line satirical video, an animated Doc Brown (voiced by Christopher Lloyd) attempts to borrow money from a loan office to save the Institute of Future Technology.
Lloyd filmed new material for Back to the Future: The Ride, directed by Douglas Trumbull. The ride serves as a sequel to the films, following Doc Brown and his founding of the 'Institute of Future Technology'. He invites tourists to embark on a time-travelling adventure in his newly made eight passenger DeLorean. The ride was included on the trilogy's 2009 Blu-Ray re-release.

Back to the Future (franchise)

Back to the FutureBack to the Future'' trilogyBack to the Future trilogy
It was based on and inspired by the Back to the Future film series and is a mini-sequel to 1990's Back to the Future Part III.
Though the sequels did not perform quite as well at the box office as the first film, the trilogy remains immensely popular after 30 years and has yielded such spinoffs as an animated television series and a motion-simulation ride at the Universal Studios Theme Parks in Universal City, California; Orlando, Florida; and Osaka, Japan (all now closed), as well as a video game.

IMAX

IMAX 3DOmnimaxIMAX theatre
Riders would board motion-based vehicles modeled after the DeLorean DMC-12 featured in the films, and watch a film projected onto a large, dome-shaped IMAX screen.
Several amusement park attractions have integrated IMAX film segments, including Back to the Future: The Ride formerly at Universal Studios in Florida and California, Horizons formerly at Epcot and Soarin' Around the World at Disney California Adventure Park and Epcot.

Motion simulator

motion platformmotion-basedmotion simulation
The ride was a motion simulator with the DeLoreans located under a 70-foot (21.3–m) OMNIMAX Dome screen.
Back to the Future: The Ride, a simulator ride based on the Back to the Future film series, is located at Universal Studios Japan, and formerly at Universal Studios Florida and Universal Studios Hollywood. The ride used DeLorean-based simulator cars that faced a 70-foot-tall IMAX dome screen. In 2008, it was replaced at the Florida and Hollywood parks by another simulator ride, The Simpsons Ride.

Phil Hettema

Produced by: Craig Barr, Philip Hettema and Terry Winnick
Hettema's next project was to help design Back to the Future: The Ride, which was originally set to debut at Universal Studios Hollywood.

Takashi Taniguchi

In the Japanese version, Takeshi Aono and Takashi Taniguchi voiced Doc Brown and Biff Tannen, respectively.
Back to the Future: The Ride(Biff tannen)

Douglas Trumbull

Doug Trumbull
Directors Douglas Trumbull and David de Vos starred as IFT scientists, while Michael Klastorin who was a unit publicist for the second and third films, was an IFT security guard in the ride's film.
Exhausted from his battles with the Hollywood system ("The movie business is so totally screwed up that I just don't have the energy to invest three or four years in a feature film"), Trumbull retreated to the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts, to escape "the lawyers, the insurance agents, the creeps", redirecting his career away from traditional Hollywood projects and concentrating instead on developing new technology for movie production, and for the exhibition industry and theme-park rides, such as the Back to the Future Ride at Universal Studios Theme Park.

Peyton Reed

Written by: Peyton Reed
Back to the Future: The Ride (Screenwriter) (1991)

DeLorean time machine

DeLoreanflux capacitorDeLorean DMC-12
In Back to the Future: The Ride, Doc, who now lives in a lab, had created an 8-passenger DeLorean that can fly just like the original DeLorean (which can be seen in the ride and in the outside display) and the Hover Train (which can only be seen in display outside of the attraction).

Universal Parks & Resorts

Universal StudiosUniversal Studios theme parksUniversal
Back to the Future: The Ride was a simulator ride at Universal Studios theme parks.