Electron micrograph of Treponema pallidum
Rod-shaped Bacillus subtilis
Primary chancre of syphilis at the site of infection on the penis
Phylogenetic tree of Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. The vertical line at bottom represents the last universal common ancestor.
Typical presentation of secondary syphilis with a rash on the palms of the hands
Bacteria display many cell morphologies and arrangements
Reddish papules and nodules over much of the body due to secondary syphilis
The range of sizes shown by prokaryotes (Bacteria), relative to those of other organisms and biomolecules.
Model of a head of a person with tertiary (gummatous) syphilis, Musée de l'Homme, Paris
Structure and contents of a typical Gram-positive bacterial cell (seen by the fact that only one cell membrane is present).
Histopathology of Treponema pallidum spirochetes using a modified Steiner silver stain
An electron micrograph of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus cells with carboxysomes inside, with arrows highlighting visible carboxysomes. Scale bars indicate 100 nm.
This poster acknowledges the social stigma of syphilis, while urging those who possibly have the disease to be tested (circa 1936).
Helicobacter pylori electron micrograph, showing multiple flagella on the cell surface
Micrograph of secondary syphilis skin lesions. (A/B) H&E stain of SS lesions. (C/D) IHC staining reveals abundant spirochetes embedded within a mixed cellular inflammatory infiltrate (shown in the red box) in the papillary dermis. The blue arrow points to a tissue histiocyte and the read arrows to two dermal lymphocytes.
Bacillus anthracis (stained purple) growing in cerebrospinal fluid
Portrait of Mr. J. Kay, affected with what is now believed to have been congenital syphilis c. 1820
Many bacteria reproduce through binary fission, which is compared to mitosis and meiosis in this image.
Jarisch–Herxheimer reaction in a person with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus
A culture of ''Salmonella
Syphilis deaths per million persons in 2012
A colony of Escherichia coli
Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse by Rembrandt van Rijn, circa 1665–67, oil on canvas. De Lairesse, himself a painter and art theorist, had congenital syphilis that deformed his face and eventually blinded him.
Helium ion microscopy image showing T4 phage infecting E. coli. Some of the attached phage have contracted tails indicating that they have injected their DNA into the host. The bacterial cells are ~ 0.5 µm wide.
An early medical illustration of people with syphilis, Vienna, 1498
Transmission electron micrograph of Desulfovibrio vulgaris showing a single flagellum at one end of the cell. Scale bar is 0.5 micrometers long.
A Work Projects Administration poster about syphilis c. 1940
The different arrangements of bacterial flagella: A-Monotrichous; B-Lophotrichous; C-Amphitrichous; D-Peritrichous
Preparation and Use of Guayaco for Treating Syphilis, after Stradanus, 1590
Streptococcus mutans visualised with a Gram stain.
Phylogenetic tree showing the diversity of bacteria, compared to other organisms. Here bacteria are represented by three main supergroups: the CPR ultramicrobacterias, Terrabacteria and Gracilicutes according to recent genomic analyzes (2019).
Overview of bacterial infections and main species involved.
Colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella typhimurium (red) invading cultured human cells
In bacterial vaginosis, beneficial bacteria in the vagina (top) are displaced by pathogens (bottom). Gram stain.
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the first microbiologist and the first person to observe bacteria using a microscope.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum.

- Syphilis

However, several species of bacteria are pathogenic and cause infectious diseases, including cholera, syphilis, anthrax, leprosy, tuberculosis, tetanus and bubonic plague.

- Bacteria

4 related topics

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Chemical structure of Penicillin G. The sulfur and nitrogen of the five-membered thiazolidine ring are shown in yellow and blue respectively. The image shows that the thiazolidine ring and fused four-membered β-lactam are not in the same plane.

Penicillin

Penicillins (P, PCN or PEN) are a group of antibiotics originally obtained from Penicillium moulds, principally P. chrysogenum and P. rubens.

Penicillins (P, PCN or PEN) are a group of antibiotics originally obtained from Penicillium moulds, principally P. chrysogenum and P. rubens.

Chemical structure of Penicillin G. The sulfur and nitrogen of the five-membered thiazolidine ring are shown in yellow and blue respectively. The image shows that the thiazolidine ring and fused four-membered β-lactam are not in the same plane.
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Penicillin and other β-lactam antibiotics act by inhibiting penicillin-binding proteins, which normally catalyze cross-linking of bacterial cell walls.
Alexander Fleming, who is credited with discovering penicillin in 1928.
Sample of penicillium mould presented by Alexander Fleming to Douglas Macleod, 1935
Howard Florey (pictured), Alexander Fleming and Ernst Chain shared a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 for their work on penicillin.
Dorothy Hodgkin's model of penicillin's structure.
A 1957 fermentor (bioreactor) used to grow Penicillium mould.
Penicillin G biosynthesis
A technician preparing penicillin in 1943
Penicillin was being mass-produced in 1944.
World War II poster extolling use of penicillin
Dorothy Hodgkin determined the chemical structure of penicillin.

They are still widely used today for different bacterial infections, though many types of bacteria have developed resistance following extensive use.

It can be formulated as an insoluble salt, and there are two such formulations in current use: procaine penicillin and benzathine benzylpenicillin, which are used only in the treatment of syphilis.

Testing the susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to antibiotics by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method – antibiotics diffuse from antibiotic-containing disks and inhibit growth of S. aureus, resulting in a zone of inhibition.

Antibiotic

Testing the susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to antibiotics by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method – antibiotics diffuse from antibiotic-containing disks and inhibit growth of S. aureus, resulting in a zone of inhibition.
Molecular targets of antibiotics on the bacteria cell
Protein synthesis inhibitors (antibiotics)
Scanning electron micrograph of a human neutrophil ingesting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)
This poster from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "Get Smart" campaign, intended for use in doctors' offices and other healthcare facilities, warns that antibiotics do not work for viral illnesses such as the common cold.
Arsphenamine, also known as salvarsan, discovered in 1907 by Paul Ehrlich.
Paul Ehrlich and Sahachiro Hata
Penicillin, discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928
Alexander Fleming was awarded a Nobel prize for his role in the discovery of penicillin
Phage injecting its genome into a bacterium. Viral replication and bacterial cell lysis will ensue.
Fecal microbiota transplants are an experimental treatment for C. difficile infection.
Share of population using safely managed sanitation facilities in 2015.

An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria.

While their early compounds were too toxic, Ehrlich and Sahachiro Hata, a Japanese bacteriologist working with Erlich in the quest for a drug to treat syphilis, achieved success with the 606th compound in their series of experiments.

Meninges of the central nervous system: dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater.

Meningitis

Acute or chronic inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges.

Acute or chronic inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, known collectively as the meninges.

Meninges of the central nervous system: dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater.
Neck stiffness, Texas meningitis epidemic of 1911–12
Charlotte Cleverley-Bisman developed severe meningococcal meningitis as a young child; in her case, the petechial rash progressed to gangrene and required amputation of all limbs. She survived the disease and became a poster child for a meningitis vaccination campaign in New Zealand.
Streptococcus pneumoniae—a causative bacteria of meningitis (illustration).
Cloudy CSF from a person with meningitis due to Streptococcus
Gram stain of meningococci from a culture showing Gram negative (pink) bacteria, often in pairs
Histopathology of bacterial meningitis: autopsy case of a person with pneumococcal meningitis showing inflammatory infiltrates of the pia mater consisting of neutrophil granulocytes (inset, higher magnification).
Structural formula of ceftriaxone, one of the third-generation cefalosporin antibiotics recommended for the initial treatment of bacterial meningitis.
Disability-adjusted life year for meningitis per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004.
Demography of meningococcal meningitis.
Deaths from meningitis per million persons in 2012

The inflammation may be caused by infection with viruses, bacteria or other microorganisms.

Aseptic meningitis may also result from infection with spirochetes, a group of bacteria that includes Treponema pallidum (the cause of syphilis) and Borrelia burgdorferi (known for causing Lyme disease).

Treponema pallidum

Micrograph showing T. pallidum (black and thin) – Dieterle stain

Treponema pallidum is a spirochaete bacterium with various subspecies that cause the diseases syphilis, bejel (also known as endemic syphilis), and yaws.