Baekje

PaekcheBaekje KingdomBaekjaeBaekcheKingdom of BaekjeList of Baekje researchersBaekjae DynastyBaekje DynastyBaekje Dynasty (18 BCE – 660 CE)Baiji
Baekje ( (also Paekche); 18 BC – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwestern Korea.wikipedia
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Three Kingdoms of Korea

Three KingdomsThree Kingdoms periodKorea
It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.
The Three Kingdoms of Korea refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje, Silla and Goguryeo .

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. Baekje, like Goguryeo, claimed to succeed Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria around the time of Gojoseon's fall. Baekje was founded in 18 BC by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Goguryeo south to the Han River basin. King Geunchogo (346–375) expanded Baekje's territory to the north through war against Goguryeo, while annexing the remaining Mahan societies in the south.
Along with Baekje and Silla, Goguryeo was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Silla

Silla DynastySilla KingdomShilla
It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.
Silla, along with Baekje and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Onjo of Baekje

OnjoKing OnjoGoguryeo prince
Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul). Baekje was founded in 18 BC by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Goguryeo south to the Han River basin.
Onjo (?–28, r. 18 BC–AD 28 ) was the founding monarch of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Wiryeseong

Wiryefirst capitalWirye-seong
Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul). Onjo settled in Wiryeseong (present-day Hanam), and called his country Sipje (십제, 十濟, meaning "Ten Vassals"), while Biryu settled in Michuhol (present-day Incheon), against the vassals' advice.
Wiryeseong was the name of two early capitals of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaSeoul, KoreaHanseong
Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul).
Strategically situated along the Han River, Seoul's history stretches back over two thousand years, when it was founded in 18 BCE by the people of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Dongmyeong of Goguryeo

JumongKing DongmyeongDongmyeong
Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul). Jumong became Divine King Dongmyeong, and had two more sons with So Seo-no, Onjo and Biryu.
It also means "sun" in Korean as Buyeo, Goguryeo and Baekje were deeply involved in Sun Worship.

Soseono

So Seo-noLady Soseono
Baekje was founded by Onjo, the third son of Goguryeo's founder Jumong and So Seo-no, at Wiryeseong (present-day southern Seoul). Jumong became Divine King Dongmyeong, and had two more sons with So Seo-no, Onjo and Biryu.
She was a key figure in the founding of both Goguryeo and Baekje.

Later Silla

Unified SillaSillaUnified Silla period
In 660 it was defeated, by an alliance of Silla and the Chinese Tang Dynasty, and submitted to Unified Silla.
Later Silla (668–935, ) or Unified Silla is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje and Goguryeo in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula.

Samguk sagi

History of the Three KingdomsSamguksagiHistorical Record of the Three Kingdoms
The Samguk Sagi provides a detailed account of Baekje's founding.
Samguk sagi (삼국사기, 三國史記, History of the Three Kingdoms) is a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea: Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla.

Buyeo

Buyeo kingdomBukbuyeoFuyu
Baekje, like Goguryeo, claimed to succeed Buyeo, a state established in present-day Manchuria around the time of Gojoseon's fall.
Both Goguryeo and Baekje, two of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, considered themselves Buyeo's successors.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
It became a significant regional sea power, with political and trade relations with China and Japan. King Uija and his son Buyeo Yung were sent into exile in China while at least some of the ruling class fled to Japan.
Buddhism was introduced to Japan from Baekje, Korea and was promoted by Prince Shōtoku, but the subsequent development of Japanese Buddhism was primarily influenced by China.

Han River (Korea)

Han RiverHanHangang
Baekje was founded in 18 BC by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Goguryeo south to the Han River basin.
Baekje called it the Ungniha (욱리하; 郁里河; "Fragrant Mile River"), while the kingdom of Silla termed it the Iha (이하; 泥河; "Muddy River").

Mahan confederacy

Mahanunrelated confederation
According to the Chinese Records of the Three Kingdoms, during the Samhan period, one of the chiefdoms of the Mahan confederacy was called already Baekje.
Baekje began as a member statelet, but later overtook all of Mahan and became one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Gaeru of Baekje

GaeruKing Gaeru of BaekjeKing Gaeru
King Gaeru is believed to have moved the capital north of the river to Bukhansanseong in 132, probably in present-day Goyang to the northwest of Seoul.
Gaeru of Baekje (died 166, r. 128–166) was the fourth king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Goi of Baekje

GoiKing Goi
During the reign of King Goi (234–286), Baekje became a full-fledged kingdom, as it continued consolidating the Mahan confederacy.
Goi of Baekje (died 286, r. 234–286) was the eighth king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Hanam

Hanam-siHanam City
Onjo settled in Wiryeseong (present-day Hanam), and called his country Sipje (십제, 十濟, meaning "Ten Vassals"), while Biryu settled in Michuhol (present-day Incheon), against the vassals' advice.
The ancient Baekje capital of Hanam Wiryeseong may have been located there.

Geunchogo of Baekje

GeunchogoKing GeunchogoSiege of Pyongyang (371)
King Geunchogo (346–375) expanded Baekje's territory to the north through war against Goguryeo, while annexing the remaining Mahan societies in the south.
Geunchogo of Baekje (324–375, r. 346–375) was the 13th king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Biryu

Jumong became Divine King Dongmyeong, and had two more sons with So Seo-no, Onjo and Biryu.
Biryu was the second son of Jumong and So Seo-no, and older brother of Onjo, the traditionally recognized founder of Baekje (18 BCE–660 CE), which was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Samhan

HanProtohistoricProto-historic Korea
According to the Chinese Records of the Three Kingdoms, during the Samhan period, one of the chiefdoms of the Mahan confederacy was called already Baekje.
By the 4th century, Mahan was fully absorbed into the Baekje kingdom, Jinhan into the Silla kingdom, and Byeonhan into the Gaya confederacy, which was later annexed by Silla.

Tang dynasty

TangTang ChinaTang Empire
In 660 it was defeated, by an alliance of Silla and the Chinese Tang Dynasty, and submitted to Unified Silla.
Allying with the Korean Silla Kingdom, the Chinese fought against Baekje and their Yamato Japanese allies in the Battle of Baekgang in August 663, a decisive Tang–Silla victory.

Proto–Three Kingdoms of Korea

Proto–Three Kingdoms periodProto–Three KingdomsProto Three Kingdoms
Through the early centuries of the Common Era, sometimes called the Proto–Three Kingdoms Period, early Baekje gradually gained control over the other Mahan tribes.
Proto–Three Kingdoms of Korea (or Samhan) refers to the proto-historical period in the Korean Peninsula, after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms.

Seong of Baekje

SeongKing SeongKing Seong of Baekje
In 538, King Seong moved the capital to Sabi (present-day Buyeo County), and rebuilt his kingdom into a strong state.
523–554) was the 26th king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Gongju

KongjuGongju Bridge, GongjuKoshu, South Korea
Baekje's capital was located at Ungjin (present-day Gongju) from 475 to 538.
Gongju was formerly named Ungjin and was the capital of Baekje from AD 475 to 538.

Uija of Baekje

King UijaUijaBuyeo Uija
King Uija and his son Buyeo Yung were sent into exile in China while at least some of the ruling class fled to Japan.
Uija of Baekje (599?–660, r. 641 –660) was the 31st and final ruler of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.