A report on Sweden and Baltic Sea

Map of the Baltic Sea region
Danish Straits and southwestern Baltic Sea
A Vendel-era helmet, at the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities
Åland between Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia
Viking expeditions (blue lines)
Cape Arkona on the island of Rügen in Germany, was a sacred site of the Rani tribe before Christianization.
The Tjängvide image stone dating from 800 to 1099, example of Viking art
Main trading routes of the Hanseatic League (Hanse).
Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), a site of religious and political importance in the early days of Sweden
In 1649 the settlement of the Latvian-speaking Kursenieki spanned from Klaipėda to Gdańsk along the coast of the Baltic Sea.
Skog tapestry, made most probably during the late 13th century.
The naval Battle of the Sound took place on 8 November 1658 during the Dano-Swedish War.
Gustav I liberated Sweden from Christian II of Denmark, ending the Kalmar Union. He established the House of Vasa which ruled Sweden and Poland until the 17th century
The burning Cap Arcona shortly after the attacks, 3 May 1945. Only 350 survived of the 4,500 prisoners who had been aboard
Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld in 1631.
Baltic drainage basins (catchment area), with depth, elevation, major rivers and lakes
The Swedish Empire between 1611 and 1815, with its absolute peak between 1658 and 1660.
Curonian Spit in Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia
The Battle of Poltava in 1709. In the following years, Russia and her allies occupied all Swedish dominions on the Baltic coast and even Finland.
Regions and basins of the Baltic Sea: 
1 = Bothnian Bay
2 = Bothnian Sea
1 + 2 = Gulf of Bothnia, partly also 3 & 4
3 = Archipelago Sea
4 = Åland Sea
5 = Gulf of Finland
6 = Northern Baltic Proper
7 = Western Gotland Basin
8 = Eastern Gotland Basin
9 = Gulf of Riga
10 = Bay of Gdańsk/Gdansk Basin
11 = Bornholm Basin and Hanö Bight
12 = Arkona Basin 6–12 = Baltic Proper
13 = Kattegat, not an integral part of the Baltic Sea
14 = Belt Sea (Little Belt and Great Belt)
15 = Öresund (The Sound) 14 + 15 = Danish Straits, not an integral part of the Baltic Sea
Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden, Famine of 1867–1869
Satellite image of the Baltic Sea in a mild winter
Swedish emigrants boarding ship in Gothenburg in 1905
Traversing Baltic Sea and ice
A Swedish soldier during World War II. Sweden remained neutral during the conflict.
On particularly cold winters, the coastal parts of the Baltic Sea freeze into ice thick enough to walk or ski on.
Tage Erlander (left), Prime Minister under the ruling Swedish Social Democratic Party from 1946 to 1969.
Piles of drift ice on the shore of Puhtulaid, near Virtsu, Estonia, in late April
Sweden joined the European Union in 1995 and signed the Lisbon Treaty in 2007.
Depths of the Baltic Sea in meters
Second day of the Stockholm Husby riots. The picture shows three cars on fire in the Stockholm suburb of Husby, 20 May 2013
Baltic Sea near Klaipėda (Karklė).
View of the Stora Sjöfallet National Park
Skerries form an integral and typical part of many of the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea, such as these in the archipelago of Åland, Finland.
Scania in southern Sweden
Stockholm archipelago
Sandhamn island, Stockholm archipelago
Aerial view of Bornholm, Denmark
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the 0°C isotherm
Population density in the Baltic Sea catchment area
Köppen climate classification types of Sweden using the -3°C isotherm
Vasilyevsky Island in Saint Petersburg, Russia
Map of Sweden's five major vegetation zones
Stockholm in Sweden
The current King of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, and his consort, Queen Silvia
Riga in Latvia
Rosenbad, in central Stockholm, has been the seat of the Government since 1981.
Helsinki in Finland
The Riksdag chamber, at the time of a vote, in 2009
Gdańsk in Poland
The party leaders lined up before the start of the televised live debate on 12 September 2014.
Tallinn in Estonia
Municipal divisions of Sweden
Satellite photo of the Baltic Sea surrounding Gotland, Sweden, with algae bloom (phytoplankton) swirling in the water
Kingdoms of Svear (Sweonas) and Götar (Geats) in the 12th century, with modern borders in grey
Pedestrian pier in Sellin, Germany
The Riksdag, the Swedish Parliament in 2014
Svetlogorsk resort town in Kaliningrad Oblast, Russia
Bonde Palace in Stockholm, seat of the Supreme Court of Sweden
Mrzeżyno beach in Poland
The EU parliament in Brussels. Sweden is a member state of the European Union.
Development aid measured in GNI in 2009. Source: OECD. As a percentage Sweden is the largest donor.
The Saab JAS 39 Gripen is an advanced Swedish multi-role fighter aircraft of the Swedish Air Force.
The Infantry fighting vehicle CV90, which is produced and used by Sweden
Gross regional product (GRP) per capita in thousands of kronor (2014)
A proportional representation of Sweden exports, 2019
Sweden is home to Volvo Cars, an automobile company with its headquarters in Gothenburg
Real GDP growth in Sweden, 1996–2006
Sweden is part of the Schengen Area and the EU single market.
Nordstan is one of the largest shopping malls in northern Europe
Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, located south of Gothenburg
The Öresund Bridge between Malmö and Copenhagen in Denmark
Stockholm Central Station
Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and institutor of the Nobel Prize
Population density in the counties of Sweden.
people/km²
Distribution of speakers of the Swedish language
The Protestant Katarina Church in Stockholm
The second oldest mosque in Sweden is the Malmö Mosque, inaugurated in 1984
Historical development of life expectancy in Sweden
Uppsala University (established 1477)
Nationalmuseum in Stockholm
The Swedish band ABBA in April 1974, a few days after they won the Eurovision Song Contest
Djurgårdsbron
Kalmar Cathedral
Headquarters of Sveriges Television in Stockholm
The writer and playwright August Strindberg
Walpurgis Night bonfire in Sweden
Cinnamon rolls originated in Sweden and Denmark.
Former World No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg
Former world No. 1 tennis player Björn Borg

The Baltic Sea is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, Sweden and the North and Central European Plain.

- Baltic Sea

Situated in Northern Europe, Sweden lies west of the Baltic Sea and Gulf of Bothnia, providing a long coastline, and forms the eastern part of the Scandinavian Peninsula.

- Sweden

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Overall

Gdańsk

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A manuscript fragment featuring gyddanyzc
The largest medieval port crane in Europe, situated over the river Motława.
Excavated remains of 12th-century buildings in Gdańsk
Monument to defenders of Polish Gdańsk also commemorates the victims of the 1308 massacre carried out by the Teutonic Knights.
Apotheosis of Gdańsk by Izaak van den Blocke. The Vistula-borne trade of goods in Poland was the main source of prosperity during the city's Golden Age.
The Green Gate, inspired by the Antwerp City Hall, was built to serve as the formal residence of the Polish kings.
Gdańsk Town Hall, with its 83-metre spire, is one of the city's main landmarks.
Colorized photo, c. 1900, showing prewar roof of the Krantor crane (Brama Żuraw).
An aerial view of the historic city centre around 1920
A 1920s map of the city
The German battleship SMS Schleswig-Holstein firing at the Polish Military Transit Depot during the battle of Westerplatte in September 1939
Captured Polish defenders of the Polish Post Office in Danzig shortly before their trial and execution by the Wehrmacht.
Example of Dutch-style buildings rebuilt after the war: The Old Arsenal by Anthony van Obberghen, Jan Strakowski and Abraham van den Blocke, 1602–1605.
The Gdańsk Shipyard strike in 1980
UEFA Euro 2012 in Gdańsk
View of Gdańsk's Main Town from the Motława River (2012)
Royal Chapel of the Polish King – John III Sobieski was built in baroque style between 1678 and 1681 by Tylman van Gameren.
St. Mary's Church – the largest brick church in the world
Polish Post Office, site of the 1939 battle
Abbot's Palace in Oliwa
archeological Museum and Mariacka Gate
Museum of the Second World War, opened in 2017
Pesa Atribo of the PKP Fast Urban Railways (SKM) in Gdańsk
Gdańsk Lech Wałęsa Airport
Stadion Miejski
Ergo Arena
Gdańsk City Council composition from 2018
Gdańsk University of Technology
Gdańsk Medical University
Polish Baltic Philharmonic on the Motława river

Gdańsk (, also ; ; Gduńsk; Danzig ; Gedanum, Dantiscum) is a city on the Baltic coast of northern Poland.

🇸🇪 Kalmar, Sweden

Rostock

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Largest city in the German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and lies in the Mecklenburgian part of the state, close to the border with Pomerania.

Largest city in the German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and lies in the Mecklenburgian part of the state, close to the border with Pomerania.

Confirmation of Lübeck law city rights, 1218
Rostock University, the oldest university in continental northern Europe and the Baltic Sea area, founded in 1419.
Rostock in the 16th century
Rostock in the 17th century
Rostock 1780–90
Colourful gabled houses of Rostock
Coat of Arms
Motto: Within your walls may be harmony and happiness
Restored Rostock City Hall, a mixture of Baroque and Brick Gothic architecture.
Geographical position of the Rostock Regiopolis
Aerial view of marina and Yacht Harbour Residence "Hohe Düne" at the Baltic Sea, close to Warnemünde.
Heiligengeisthof (Holy Spirit Courtyard).
Kröpeliner Straße – main shopping street
Alexandrinenstraße in Warnemünde.
Speicher (office buildings) at night. Headquarters of AIDA Cruises.
Historical Botanical Garden of Rostock University, greenhouse
Volkstheater Rostock
Walter Kempowski archives
Ostseestadion, home ground of Hansa Rostock
Rostock Hauptbahnhof (main station)
Transit map of Rostock
Rostock harbour at sunset
Simon Paulli
Albrecht Kossel
Ernst Heinkel
Peter Schulz
Jan Ullrich
Depiction of Rostock in 1845
Rostock bomb damage, 1942
City hall, Market Square after war
Rostock in 2011
The 16th-century Steintor city gate
St. Mary's Church (Marienkirche), 2011
Results of the second round of the 2019 mayoral election.
Winning party by precinct in the 2019 city council election.
Seat distribution in the 2019 city council election.

With around 208,000 inhabitants, it is the third-largest city on the German Baltic coast after Kiel and Lübeck, the eighth-largest city in the area of former East Germany, as well as the 39th-largest city of Germany.

Rostock has an oceanic climate (Köppen: Cfb) with strong influence of the Baltic Sea, more similar with Denmark and far southern Sweden than to the rest of Germany.

Portrait by Jean-Marc Nattier, after 1717

Peter the Great

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Monarch of Russia who modernised it and made it a European power.

Monarch of Russia who modernised it and made it a European power.

Portrait by Jean-Marc Nattier, after 1717
Peter the Great as a child
The Tsardom of Russia, c. 1700
Capture of Azov, 1696, by Robert Ker Porter
Portrait of Peter I by Godfrey Kneller, 1698. This portrait was Peter's gift to the King of England.
Peter on board of his yacht en route to the Peter and Paul
Statue of Peter in Rotterdam
Peter I of Russia pacifies his marauding troops after retaking Narva in 1704, by Nikolay Sauerweid, 1859
Peter the Great Meditating the Idea of Building St Petersburg at the Shore of the Baltic Sea, by Alexandre Benois, 1916
Peter I in the Battle of Poltava, a mosaic by Mikhail Lomonosov
Peter I, by Carel de Moor, 1717
Diamond order of Peter the Great
Monument to Peter the Great in St. Petersburg
Portrait of Peter by Maria Giovanna Clementi
Peter the Great on his deathbed, by Nikitin
The 1782 statue of Peter I in Saint Petersburg, informally known as the Bronze Horseman
Peter I interrogating his son Alexei, a painting by Nikolai Ge (1871)
Portrait of Peter the Great
Tomb of Peter the Great in Peter and Paul Fortress

Through a number of successful wars, he captured ports at Azov and the Baltic Sea, laying the groundwork for the Imperial Russian Navy, ending uncontested Swedish supremacy in the Baltic and beginning the Tsardom's expansion into a much larger empire that became a major European power.

The Baltic Sea was at the time controlled by Sweden in the north, while the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea were controlled by the Ottoman Empire and Safavid Empire respectively in the south.

Kiel

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Capital and most populous city in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein, with a population of 249,023 .

Capital and most populous city in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein, with a population of 249,023 .

Panoramic view of the city
Kiel in the 16th century
Schleswig-Holstein with Kiel Fjord at the Baltic Coast
Port and Kiel Fjord
Kiel Opera House and the tower (107 m) of Kiel Town Hall
The German cruiser Admiral Scheer capsized in the docks at Kiel after being hit in an RAF raid on the night of 9/10 April 1945.
Kiel Harbour, an Admiralty chart of 1971
Image showing the population density of Kiel by district. Data from 2010.
Geistkämpfer in front of the Nikolaikirche, by Ernst Barlach
Kiel Opera House and the Town Hall (Kieler Rathaus)
Results of the 2018 city council election.
The Holstenstraße is one of the longest shopping streets in Germany — Kiel is the largest city in the state of Schleswig-Holstein.
traffic map
Holstenstraße Kiel 1917 ({{Interlanguage link multi|Willy Lucas|de}})
Special issue stamp Kiel Week 1982
Historic ships at Kiel Week
Old Botanical Garden, Kiel
U995 Laboe
Warleberger Hof
Maritime Museum in the former fish market

Due to its geographic location in the southeast of the Jutland peninsula on the southwestern shore of the Baltic Sea, Kiel has become one of Germany's major maritime centres, known for a variety of international sailing events, including the annual Kiel Week, which is the biggest sailing event in the world.

A number of passenger ferries to Sweden, Norway, Lithuania and other countries operate from here.

The marina in the summer of 2015.

Ystad

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The marina in the summer of 2015.
Street plan of Ystad in c.1850.
The ferry terminal, and behind it, Ystad railway station
The Greyfriars Abbey
207x207px

Ystad (older Ysted) is a town and the seat of Ystad Municipality, in Scania County, Sweden.

Both are highly influenced by Gothic Hansa architecture (which can also be seen in churches around the Baltic Sea, for instance in Helsingborg, Malmö, and Rostock) and are among the best examples in Sweden of Brick Gothic.

Wismar

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Wismar (Low German: Wismer), officially the Hanseatic City of Wismar (Hansestadt Wismar) is, with around 43,000 inhabitants, the sixth-largest city of the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and the fourth-largest city of Mecklenburg after Rostock, Schwerin and Neubrandenburg.

Wismar (Low German: Wismer), officially the Hanseatic City of Wismar (Hansestadt Wismar) is, with around 43,000 inhabitants, the sixth-largest city of the northeastern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and the fourth-largest city of Mecklenburg after Rostock, Schwerin and Neubrandenburg.

Wismar in the 16th century
Alter Schwede, c. 1380
Siege of Wismar of 1675
View over the city
Reconstruction of the Medieval Gothic Georgenkirche (St. George's Church) was completed in 2010.
Gottlob Frege around 1879
Marita Koch 1984
Schreck in Nosferatu

Wismar is located on the Bay of Wismar of the Baltic Sea, directly opposite the island of Poel, that separates the Bay of Wismar from the larger Bay of Mecklenburg.

🇸🇪 Kalmar, Sweden (2002)

Old town center of Sassnitz

Sassnitz

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Town on the Jasmund peninsula, Rügen Island, in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.

Town on the Jasmund peninsula, Rügen Island, in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.

Old town center of Sassnitz
Cliff shoreline of Jasmund National Park
Parts of the chalk cliffs at Jasmund National Park: Victoria-Sicht (Victoria's View) and Königsstuhl (King's Chair), seen from the Baltic Sea
Historical postcard (1912) of the hilly shores lined with noble mansions, showing the typical resort architecture of German Baltic Sea resorts. More postcards
Fishing boat in the port, circa 1962
Nowadays: Posh historical hotels of the former upper class, including the 'Fürstenhof' (royal court) and 'Strandhotel' (beach hotel)
Suspension bridge to the port (for pedestrians)
Town hall
Old fishing port
On the breakwater wall of the old Sassnitz harbour
HMS Otus submarine in Sassnitz Harbour
Skane Jet operates the Sassnitz - Ystad route from autumn 2020.
Dwasieden Castle, drawing from 1879
1981 East German stamp with the memorial to anti-fascist resistance fighters
Former POS of Sassnitz (Polytechnic Secondary School), interior designed by Hermann Henselmann
Sassnitz Ferry port
Route of the Stralsund–Sassnitz railway
Monument to the deep sea fishermen in Sassnitz who did not return from sea
Monument to Lenin in Sassnitz
New Mukran Port
Sassnitz aerial view (2011), the famous chalk cliffs of the Jasmund National Park to the right. {{sub|More aerial photos}}
Sassnitz Mukran, the ferry port of Sassnitz
Chalk rocks in the front, spa town of Sassnitz in the back
The small yet deep Herthasee in the national park as part of Sassnitz, with the Slavic hill fort Herthaburg at its banks
Sassnitz Breakwater Light
Concert pavilion of Sassnitz, shaped like a shell
'Alter Reichshof' (imperial court)
Villa Hertha, a historical mansion featuring the typical resort architecture of the region
'Kurhotel', the historical health resort hotel of Sassnitz
At the main shopping street of Sassnitz
Old post office
Former pilot station, now used as a vacation home
The Protestant (Evangelical) church

The predecessor to what later became the Baltic Sea, the Ancylus Lake, was formed.

🇸🇪 Trelleborg, Sweden

Travemünde beach, showing its characteristic roofed wicker beach chairs (Strandkorb in German)

Travemünde

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Borough of Lübeck, Germany, located at the mouth of the river Trave in Lübeck Bay.

Borough of Lübeck, Germany, located at the mouth of the river Trave in Lübeck Bay.

Travemünde beach, showing its characteristic roofed wicker beach chairs (Strandkorb in German)
Barque Passat in Travemünde
Ida Boy-Ed
Kurhaus hotel, designed by architect Joseph Christian Lillie
Mouth of river Trave
Casino building, now Columbia hotel
Lübeck-Travemünde Strand station, displaying the time of the next Lübeck train
The fountain field, only 200 meters from the railway station, marks the beginning of the promenade
Excursion boats and roofed wicker beach chairs
View of the town from the Trave promenade
The shopping street Vorderreihe
The bailiff's residence from 1551, one of the oldest buildings in town
View from the boardwalk, beach and Columbia hotel (the former Casino building)
River Trave with the tall sailing ship Passat and the town skyline
Ancient houses and the tower of St Lorenz Church
Cruise ship at Ostpreussen Quay, close to the Vorderreihe promenade

Travemünde has been a seaside resort since 1802, and is Germany's largest ferry port on the Baltic Sea with connections to Sweden, Finland, Russia, Latvia and Estonia.

Mariehamn

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Capital of Åland, an autonomous territory under Finnish sovereignty.

Capital of Åland, an autonomous territory under Finnish sovereignty.

Due to its central location in the Baltic Sea, Mariehamn has become a major summer resort town for global tourism; as many as 1.5 million tourists visit there annually.

The Western Harbour is an important international harbour with daily traffic to Sweden, Estonia and mainland Finland.

Norrköping

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Norrköping in 1876.
Drottninggatan (Queen's Street) in Norrköping
The City Hall
The Ice Hockey player Magnus Pääjärvi-Svensson comes from Norrköping
Nya Parken

Norrköping is a city in the province of Östergötland in eastern Sweden and the seat of Norrköping Municipality, Östergötland County, about 160 km southwest of the national capital Stockholm, 40 km east of county seat Linköping and 60 km west of the Södermanland capital of Nyköping.

The city is situated by the mouth of the river Motala ström, at Bråviken, an inlet of the Baltic Sea.