Baltimore Orioles

OriolesBaltimoreMilwaukee BrewersSt. Louis BrownsBALBrownsSt. Louis Browns/Baltimore OriolesBrewersMilwaukeeMilwaukee Brewers/St. Louis Browns
The Baltimore Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland.wikipedia
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New York Yankees

YankeesNew York HighlandersNew York
The Orioles adopted their team name in honor of the official state bird of Maryland; it had also been used by several previous major and minor league baseball clubs in Baltimore, including another AL charter member franchise also named the "Baltimore Orioles," which moved north in 1903 to eventually become the New York Yankees.
In the season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles (no relation to the modern Baltimore Orioles).

Peter Angelos

Peter G. Angelos
As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers (not related to the second current Brewers franchise there) before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current majority owner is lawyer Peter Angelos.
Angelos is also the majority owner of the Baltimore Orioles, a team in the American League of Major League Baseball.

Jim Palmer

PalmerJames Alvin Palmer
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver.
James Alvin Palmer (born October 15, 1945) is a retired American right-handed pitcher who played all of his 19 years in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Baltimore Orioles (1965–67, 1969–84) and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in.

Brooks Robinson

Brooks Robinson NightRobinson
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver. Richards succeeded in stocking the franchise with a plethora of young talent which included Dave Nicholson, Pete Ward, Ron Hansen (1960 AL Rookie of the Year), Milt Pappas, Jerry Adair, Steve Barber (20 wins in 1963), Boog Powell, Dave McNally, and Brooks Robinson.
He played his entire 23-year major league career for the Baltimore Orioles (1955–1977), which still stands as the record for the longest career spent with a single team in major league history.

2018 Baltimore Orioles season

Baltimore OriolesOrioles2018
However, the 2018 team finished with a franchise-worst record of 47–115, prompting the team to move on from Showalter and Duquette following the season's conclusion.
The 2018 Baltimore Orioles season was the 118th and worst season in Baltimore Orioles franchise history, the 65th in Baltimore, and the 27th at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Eddie Murray

Murray
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver.
Spending most of his MLB career with the Baltimore Orioles, he ranks fourth in team history in both games played and hits.

History of the St. Louis Browns

St. Louis BrownsBrownsSt. Louis
As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers (not related to the second current Brewers franchise there) before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current majority owner is lawyer Peter Angelos.
After the 1953 season, the team relocated to Baltimore, Maryland, where it became the Baltimore Orioles.

Dan Duquette

After suffering a stretch of 14 straight losing seasons from 1998 to 2011, the team qualified for the postseason three times under manager Buck Showalter and general manager Dan Duquette, including a division title and advancement to the American League Championship Series for the first time in 17 years in 2014.
Dan Duquette (born May 26, 1958) is the former General Manager of the Baltimore Orioles.

Frank Robinson

Robinson
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver.
He won the Triple Crown, was a member of two teams that won the World Series (the 1966 and 1970 Baltimore Orioles), and amassed the fourth-most career home runs at the time of his retirement (he is currently 10th).

1983 World Series

1983World Series14 years before
The Orioles experienced their greatest success from 1966 to 1983, when they made six World Series appearances, winning three of them (1966, 1970, 1983).
This is Baltimore's most recent World Series title, and also their most recent American League pennant.

Earl Weaver

Weaver
This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver.
He became a minor league manager, and then managed in MLB for 17 years with the Baltimore Orioles (1968–82; 1985–86).

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Camden YardsOriole ParkBaltimore
The Orioles are also well known for their influential ballpark, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which opened in 1992 in downtown Baltimore.
Home to the Baltimore Orioles, it is the first of the "retro" major league ballparks constructed during the 1990s and early 2000s, and remains one of the most highly praised.

Buck Showalter

Nat "Buck" Showalter
After suffering a stretch of 14 straight losing seasons from 1998 to 2011, the team qualified for the postseason three times under manager Buck Showalter and general manager Dan Duquette, including a division title and advancement to the American League Championship Series for the first time in 17 years in 2014.
He has served as manager of the New York Yankees (1992–1995), Arizona Diamondbacks (1998–2000), Texas Rangers (2003–2006), and Baltimore Orioles (2010–2018).

2014 Baltimore Orioles season

Baltimore OriolesOrioles2014
After suffering a stretch of 14 straight losing seasons from 1998 to 2011, the team qualified for the postseason three times under manager Buck Showalter and general manager Dan Duquette, including a division title and advancement to the American League Championship Series for the first time in 17 years in 2014.
IF Alexi Casilla – re-signed with Baltimore Orioles to a minor league contract with an invitation to spring training on 1/10/14

Bill Veeck

Bill Veeck, Jr.
In 1953, with the Browns unable to afford even stadium upkeep, owner Bill Veeck sold Sportsman's Park to the Cards and attempted to move the club back to Milwaukee, but this was vetoed by the other Major League owners.
Veeck was at various times the owner of the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Browns and Chicago White Sox.

Brandon Hyde

The Orioles' current manager is Brandon Hyde, while Mike Elias serves as general manager and executive vice president.
Brandon Michael Hyde (born October 3, 1973) is an American professional baseball manager for the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball.

1970 World Series

1970World Series1970 MLB World Series
The Orioles experienced their greatest success from 1966 to 1983, when they made six World Series appearances, winning three of them (1966, 1970, 1983).
The Baltimore Orioles won the American League East division by 15 games over the New York Yankees and the Cincinnati Reds won the National League West division by 14 1⁄2 games over the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Baltimore oriole

northern oriolea bird speciesbird of the same name
The Orioles adopted their team name in honor of the official state bird of Maryland; it had also been used by several previous major and minor league baseball clubs in Baltimore, including another AL charter member franchise also named the "Baltimore Orioles," which moved north in 1903 to eventually become the New York Yankees.
It is also the inspiration for the Baltimore Orioles baseball team.

1954 Baltimore Orioles season

1954Orioles1954 season
After starting the 1954 campaign with a two-game split against the Tigers in Detroit, the Orioles returned to Baltimore on April 15 to a welcoming parade that wound through the streets of downtown, with an estimated 350,000 spectators lining the route.
The 1954 Baltimore Orioles season was the franchise's 54th season (it was founded as the Milwaukee Brewers in 1901, then played as the St. Louis Browns from 1902–53) but its first season as the Baltimore Orioles.

Baltimore

Baltimore, MarylandBaltimore, MDBaltimore City
The Baltimore Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland.
In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles baseball team moved from Memorial Stadium to Oriole Park at Camden Yards, located downtown near the harbor.

Clarence Miles

As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers (not related to the second current Brewers franchise there) before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current majority owner is lawyer Peter Angelos.
Clarence Miles (June 29, 1897 – October 8, 1977) was the chairman of the board and president of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League during the and seasons.

Memorial Stadium (Baltimore)

Memorial StadiumMunicipal StadiumBaltimore's Memorial Stadium
When Oriole Park burned down in 1944, the team moved to a temporary home, Municipal Stadium, where they won the Junior World Series.
Baltimore Orioles, American League, 1954–1991

1954 Major League Baseball season

19541954 campaign
After starting the 1954 campaign with a two-game split against the Tigers in Detroit, the Orioles returned to Baltimore on April 15 to a welcoming parade that wound through the streets of downtown, with an estimated 350,000 spectators lining the route.
For the second consecutive season, an MLB franchise relocated, as the St. Louis Browns moved to Baltimore and became the Baltimore Orioles, who played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

Mike Elias

The Orioles' current manager is Brandon Hyde, while Mike Elias serves as general manager and executive vice president.
He is the executive vice president and general manager for the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Milt Pappas

Carole PappasPappas
Richards succeeded in stocking the franchise with a plethora of young talent which included Dave Nicholson, Pete Ward, Ron Hansen (1960 AL Rookie of the Year), Milt Pappas, Jerry Adair, Steve Barber (20 wins in 1963), Boog Powell, Dave McNally, and Brooks Robinson.
A 17-year veteran, Pappas, nicknamed "Gimpy", pitched for the Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, Atlanta Braves and Chicago Cubs .