Bamar people

BamarBurmeseBurmanBurmansBamarsMranmaBurmese peopleMraṅmā BamarBamar culture
The Bamar ; also historically the Burmese and Burmans) are a Sino-Tibetan ethnic group and nation native to Myanmar (Burma) where they are the dominant group.wikipedia
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Myanmar

BurmaBurmeseBurma (Myanmar)
The Bamar ; also historically the Burmese and Burmans) are a Sino-Tibetan ethnic group and nation native to Myanmar (Burma) where they are the dominant group.
In the 9th century, the Bamar people entered the upper Irrawaddy valley and, following the establishment of the Pagan Kingdom in the 1050s, the Burmese language, culture and Theravada Buddhism slowly became dominant in the country.

Burmese language

BurmeseMyanmarMyanmar language
The Bamar live primarily in the Irrawaddy River basin and speak the Burmese language, which is the sole official language of Myanmar on national level.
The Burmese language (မြန်မာဘာသာ, MLCTS: mranmabhasa, IPA: ) is a Sino-Tibetan language spoken in Myanmar where it is an official language and the language of the Bamar people, the country's principal ethnic group.

Mon people

MonMonsMon nationalism
Over the following centuries, the Burmese speakers absorbed other ethnic groups such as the Pyu and the Mon. They are closer to the Yi and Mon people than to the Karen.
The western Mon of Myanmar were largely absorbed by Bamar society.

Karen people

KarenKarensKayin
A limited 2014 DNA analysis shows that Burmese people were "typical Southeast Asian" but "also with Northeast Asian and Indian influences"; and that the gene pool of the Bamar was far more diverse than other ethnic groups such as the Karen. They are closer to the Yi and Mon people than to the Karen.
The Karen constitute the third largest ethnic population in Myanmar, after the Bamars and Shans.

Pyu city-states

PyuPyu peopleBinnaka
Over the following centuries, the Burmese speakers absorbed other ethnic groups such as the Pyu and the Mon.
The Bamar people, who came from Nanzhao, set up a garrison town at Bagan at the confluence of the Irrawaddy and Chindwin Rivers.

Burmese diaspora

Burmese
The Burmese diaspora, which is a recent phenomenon in historical terms and began at the start of World War II, has been mainly brought about by a protracted period of military rule and reflects the ethnic diversity of Myanmar.
Burma contains over 40 different ethnic groups, though the term "Burmese" can be used to refer to the Bamar ethnicity.

Rakhine people

RakhineArakaneseRakhines
The Rakhine, although culturally distinct from the Bamar, are ethnically related and speak a dialect of Burmese that includes retention of the sound, which has coalesced into the sound in standard Burmese (although it is still present in orthography).
The Rakhinese are predominantly Theravada Buddhists and are one of the four main Buddhist ethnic groups of Burma (the others being the Bamar, Shan and Mon people).

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
A limited 2014 DNA analysis shows that Burmese people were "typical Southeast Asian" but "also with Northeast Asian and Indian influences"; and that the gene pool of the Bamar was far more diverse than other ethnic groups such as the Karen.
In Burma, the Burmese account for more than two-thirds of the ethnic stock in this country.

Irrawaddy River

IrrawaddyAyeyarwady RiverAyeyarwady
The Bamar live primarily in the Irrawaddy River basin and speak the Burmese language, which is the sole official language of Myanmar on national level.
As early as the sixth century, the Bamars were using the Irrawaddy to gain power in the region through trade and transport on the China – India route.

Yangon

RangoonYangon, MyanmarRangoon, Burma
Talismanic tattoos, earrings, and long hair tied in a knot were once common among Bamar men, but have ceased to be fashionable since after World War II; men in shorts and sporting ponytails, as well as both sexes with bleached hair, have made their appearance in Yangon and Mandalay more recently, especially in the anything-goes atmosphere of the Burmese New Year holiday known as Thingyan.
Before World War II, about 55% of Yangon's population of 500,000 was Indian or South Asian, and only about a third was Bamar (Burman).

Gaung baung

Gaung Paungkhian hua
On formal occasions, men often wear cloth turbans called gaung baung and Mandarin collared jackets called taikpon, while women wear blouses.
The gaung baung (ခေါင်းပေါင်း ;, ; Shan: ; Northern Thai: เฅียนหัว ) is a traditional Burmese kerchief and part of the traditional attire of many ethnic groups inhabiting modern day Burma and Northern Thailand, particularly among most of the Buddhist-professing ethnic groups: the Bamar, Mon, Rakhine, Shan, and Tai Yuan peoples.

Burmese cuisine

BurmeseMyanmarCuisine of Myanmar
Bamar cuisine contains many regional elements, such as stir frying techniques and curries which can be hot but lightly spiced otherwise, almost always with fish paste as well as onions, garlic, ginger, dried chili and turmeric.
Another bean-based condiment popular amongst the Bamar and the central dry region is pon ye gyi - a thick salty black paste made from fermented soy beans.

Shan State

ShanShan StatesShan region
Other dialects are Taungyoe, Danu, and Intha in Shan State.
Among the Shans live the Bamar, Han-Chinese, and Karens.

Tanintharyi Region

TenasserimTanintharyi DivisionTaninthayi Region
Additional dialects come from coastal areas of Tanintharyi Region including Myeik (Beik) and Dawei (Tavoyan) as well as inland and isolated areas like Yaw.

Yi people

YiLoloYi languages
They are closer to the Yi and Mon people than to the Karen.

Mandalay

Mandalay prisonMandalay, BurmaAung Pinle
Talismanic tattoos, earrings, and long hair tied in a knot were once common among Bamar men, but have ceased to be fashionable since after World War II; men in shorts and sporting ponytails, as well as both sexes with bleached hair, have made their appearance in Yangon and Mandalay more recently, especially in the anything-goes atmosphere of the Burmese New Year holiday known as Thingyan.
While Mandalay has traditionally been the bastion of Bamar (Burman) culture and populace, the massive influx of ethnic Han-Chinese in the last 20 years has effectively influenced the ethnic-Bamar majority there.

Nat (spirit)

natnatsnat worship
The Bamar practise Buddhism along with nat worship which predated Buddhism.
Nat worship is less common in urban areas than in rural areas, and is practised among ethnic minorities of Myanmar as well as in the mainstream Bamar society.

Intha people

InthaIntha culture
Other dialects are Taungyoe, Danu, and Intha in Shan State.

Anawrahta

Anawrahta RoadAnawrathaKing Anawrahta
It involves rituals relating to a pantheon of 37 Nats or spirits designated by King Anawrahta, although many minor nats are also worshipped.
The success and longevity of Pagan's dominance over the Irrawaddy valley laid the foundation for the ascent of Burmese language and culture, the spread of Burman ethnicity in Upper Burma.

Thingyan

Burmese New YearBurmese New Year festivalBurmese New Year Water Festival
Talismanic tattoos, earrings, and long hair tied in a knot were once common among Bamar men, but have ceased to be fashionable since after World War II; men in shorts and sporting ponytails, as well as both sexes with bleached hair, have made their appearance in Yangon and Mandalay more recently, especially in the anything-goes atmosphere of the Burmese New Year holiday known as Thingyan.

Culture of Myanmar

Burmese cultureBurmeseCulture of Burma
For business and formal occasions, Bamar men wear a Manchu Chinese jacket over an English collar shirt (sometimes donning a turban called gaung baung), while Bamar women wear a blouse buttoned at the front, called yinzi or to the side, called yinbon, and a shawl.

Demographics of Myanmar

BurmeseDemographics of BurmaBurmese People
The Burmese government identifies eight major national ethnic races (which comprise 135 "distinct" ethnic groups), which include the Bamar (68%), Shan (9%), Kayin (7%), Rakhine (4%), Mon (2%), Kayah, and Kachin.

Ethnic group

ethnicityethnicethnic groups
The Bamar ; also historically the Burmese and Burmans) are a Sino-Tibetan ethnic group and nation native to Myanmar (Burma) where they are the dominant group.

Sino-Tibetan languages

Sino-TibetanSino-Tibetan languageSino-Tibetan language family
The Bamar ; also historically the Burmese and Burmans) are a Sino-Tibetan ethnic group and nation native to Myanmar (Burma) where they are the dominant group.