Bannack, Montana

BannackBannack State ParkBannock, MontanaBannack CityBannack, MontBannack, Montana TerritoryBannack, MTBannock
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.wikipedia
81 Related Articles

Ghost town

ghost townsabandonedabandoned town
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.
Some examples are Bannack in the United States, Barkerville in Canada, Craco in Italy, Kolmanskop in Namibia, Pripyat in Ukraine, and Danushkodi in India.

Beaverhead County, Montana

BeaverheadBeaverhead CountyAjax Peak
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.
The original county seat was the gold-mining town of Bannack.

Dillon, Montana

DillonDillon, MTHistory of Dillon
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.
Dillon served as a central location for transporting goods to nearby boomtowns such as Bannack, Argenta, Glen, and Virginia City.

Montana Trail

Extremely remote, it was connected to the rest of the world only by the Montana Trail.
The Montana Trail was a wagon road that served gold rush towns such as Bannack, Virginia City and later Helena, Montana during the Montana gold rush era of the 1860s and 1870s.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.
The first territorial capital was at Bannack.

Virginia City, Montana

Virginia CityVirginia City, Montana TerritoryAlder Gulch Short Line Railroad
Founded in 1862 and named after the local Bannock Indians, it was the site of a major gold discovery in 1862, and served as the capital of Montana Territory briefly in 1864, until the capital was moved to Virginia City. Twenty-two individuals were accused, informally tried, and hanged by the Vigilance Committee (the Montana Vigilantes) of Bannack and Virginia City.
In May 1863, a group of prospectors were headed toward the Yellowstone River and instead came upon a party of the Crow tribe and was forced to return to Bannack.

Henry Plummer

Henry PlumberPlummerSheriff Henry Plummer
Bannack's sheriff, Henry Plummer, was accused by some of secretly leading a ruthless band of road agents, with early accounts claiming that this gang was responsible for over a hundred murders in the Virginia City and Bannack gold fields and trails to Salt Lake City.
He was elected sheriff of Bannack, Montana from 1863 to 1864, during which period he was accused of being the leader of a "road agent" gang of outlaws known as the "Innocents," which preyed on shipments from Virginia City to other areas.

Montana Vigilantes

Vigilance Committee of Alder GulchVigilantesvigilance committees
Twenty-two individuals were accused, informally tried, and hanged by the Vigilance Committee (the Montana Vigilantes) of Bannack and Virginia City.
On July 28, 1862, gold was discovered along Grasshopper Creek, a tributary of the Beaverhead River, in a remote part of eastern Idaho Territory, leading to the establishment of the town of Bannack.

Innocents (gang)

InnocentsgangGang of Innocents
Bannack's sheriff, Henry Plummer, was accused by some of secretly leading a ruthless band of road agents, with early accounts claiming that this gang was responsible for over a hundred murders in the Virginia City and Bannack gold fields and trails to Salt Lake City.
Sheriff Henry Plummer of Bannack, Montana was accused of leading the group, and was executed by a group of vigilantes from Virginia City in January 1864, along with several other alleged gang members.

Montana Territory

MontanaTerritory of MontanaMontana Territorial
Founded in 1862 and named after the local Bannock Indians, it was the site of a major gold discovery in 1862, and served as the capital of Montana Territory briefly in 1864, until the capital was moved to Virginia City.

Nathaniel P. Langford

N. P. LangfordNathaniel Pitt Langford
Nathaniel Pitt Langford, the first superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, was a member of that vigilance committee.
The expedition ended up at the Grasshopper Creek gold fields in the area soon to be named Bannack, Montana.

Gold rush

goldrushgold rushesGold was discovered
For two days, Bannack State Park officials organize an event that attempts to revive the times when Bannack was a boom town, re-enacting the day-to-day lives of the miners who lived there during the gold rush.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 mi upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon.

National Historic Landmark

National Historic Landmark DistrictNational Historic LandmarksNational Historical Landmark
Founded in 1862, the town contemporarily operates as a National Historic Landmark and is managed by the state of Montana as Bannack State Park.

Bannock people

BannockBannocksBannock Indians
Founded in 1862 and named after the local Bannock Indians, it was the site of a major gold discovery in 1862, and served as the capital of Montana Territory briefly in 1864, until the capital was moved to Virginia City.

Cornish, New Hampshire

CornishCornish CityCornish City, New Hampshire
Among the town's founders was Dr. Erasmus Darwin Leavitt, a physician born in Cornish, New Hampshire, who gave up medicine for a time to become a gold miner.

Joaquin Miller

Cincinnatus Hiner "Joaquin" Miller
"Though some success crowned his labors," according to a history of Montana by Joaquin Miller, "he soon found that he had more reputation as a physician than as a miner, and that there was greater profit in allowing someone else to wield his pick and shovel while he attended to his profession."

Butte, Montana

ButteButte, MTButte Montana
Subsequently, Dr. Leavitt moved on to Butte, Montana, where he devoted the rest of his life to his medical practice

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City, UtahSalt Lake City, UTSalt Lake
Bannack's sheriff, Henry Plummer, was accused by some of secretly leading a ruthless band of road agents, with early accounts claiming that this gang was responsible for over a hundred murders in the Virginia City and Bannack gold fields and trails to Salt Lake City.

Lynching

lynchedlynch moblynch
A number of Plummer's associates were lynched and others banished on pain of death if they ever returned.

Exile

banishmentinternal exilebanished
A number of Plummer's associates were lynched and others banished on pain of death if they ever returned.

Vigilance committee

citizens committeeCitizens Safety CommitteeCommittee of Vigilance
Twenty-two individuals were accused, informally tried, and hanged by the Vigilance Committee (the Montana Vigilantes) of Bannack and Virginia City.

Yellowstone National Park

YellowstoneYellowstone ParkYellowstone territory
Nathaniel Pitt Langford, the first superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, was a member of that vigilance committee.

Beaverhead River

BeaverheadGrasshopper CreekBeaverhead Valley
The mines surrounding Bannack are located on both sides of Grasshopper Creek, which flows southeastward through the district and into the Beaverhead River about 12 miles downstream.