Bantu languages

BantuBantu languageBantu-speakingBantu language familyBantu branchBantu familyNarrow BantuBantu speakersBantu speakingba-ntu
The Bantu languages (English:, Proto-Bantu: *bantʊ̀) or Ntu languages (/ⁿtu/), technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorisation which includes other "Bantoid" languages, are a large family of languages spoken by the Bantu peoples throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.wikipedia
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Niger–Congo languages

Niger–CongoNiger-CongoNiger–Congo language family
As part of the Southern Bantoid group, they are part of the Benue–Congo language family, which in turn is part of the large Niger–Congo phylum.
Within Niger–Congo, the Bantu languages alone account for 350 million people (2015), or half the total Niger–Congo speaking population.

Bantu peoples

BantuBantusBantu people
The Bantu languages (English:, Proto-Bantu: *bantʊ̀) or Ntu languages (/ⁿtu/), technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorisation which includes other "Bantoid" languages, are a large family of languages spoken by the Bantu peoples throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.
Bantu are the speakers of Ntu languages, comprising several hundred indigenous ethnic groups in sub-Saharan Africa, spread over a vast area from Central Africa across the African Great Lakes to Southern Africa.

Swahili language

SwahiliKiswahiliKiswahili language
The Bantu language with the largest total number of speakers is Swahili; however, the majority of its speakers use it as a second language (L1: c. 16 million, L2: 80 million, as of 2015). With few exceptions, notably Swahili, Bantu languages are tonal and have two to four register tones.
Swahili, also known as Kiswahili (translation: language of the Swahili people), is a Bantu language and the first language of the Swahili people.

Shona language

ShonaZezuruChiShona
Other major Bantu languages include Zulu, with 27 million speakers (15.7 million L2), and Shona, with about 11 million speakers (if Manyika and Ndau are included).
Shona (chiShona) is a Bantu language of the Shona people of Zimbabwe.

Kirundi

RundiRundi languagerun
Ethnologue separates the largely mutually intelligible Kinyarwanda and Kirundi, which, if grouped together, have 12.4 million speakers.
Kirundi, also known as Rundi, is a Bantu language spoken by 9 million people in Burundi and adjacent parts of Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as in Uganda.

Zulu language

ZuluisiZululanguage
Other major Bantu languages include Zulu, with 27 million speakers (15.7 million L2), and Shona, with about 11 million speakers (if Manyika and Ndau are included).
According to Ethnologue, it is the second most widely spoken of the Bantu languages, after Swahili.

Proto-Bantu language

Proto-BantuProto-NtuBantu phonology
The name was coined to represent the word for "people" in loosely reconstructed Proto-Bantu, from the plural
Proto-Bantu is the reconstructed common ancestor of the Bantu languages, a subgroup of the Benue-Congo family.

Malcolm Guthrie

GuthrieGuthrie, Malcolm
The most widely used classification is an alphanumeric coding system developed by Malcolm Guthrie in his 1948 classification of the Bantu languages.
Malcolm Guthrie (10 February 1903 – 22 November 1972) was a professor of Bantu languages at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London.

Northeast Bantu languages

Northeast BantuTakamaBantu
The languages that share Dahl's law may also form a valid group, Northeast Bantu.
The Northeast Bantu languages are a group of Bantu languages spoken in East Africa.

Luganda

GandaLuganda languageGanda language
The most prominent grammatical characteristic of Bantu languages is the extensive use of affixes (see Sotho grammar and Ganda noun classes for detailed discussions of these affixes).
The Ganda language or Luganda (, Oluganda, ) is a Bantu language spoken in the African Great Lakes region.

Sub-Saharan Africa

sub-SaharanSub Saharan AfricaSub-Saharan African
The Bantu languages (English:, Proto-Bantu: *bantʊ̀) or Ntu languages (/ⁿtu/), technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorisation which includes other "Bantoid" languages, are a large family of languages spoken by the Bantu peoples throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.
During the first millennium CE, Nilotic and Bantu-speaking peoples moved into the region, and the latter now account for three-quarters of Kenya's population.

Southern Bantoid languages

Southern BantoidSouthern Bantoid languageSouthern
As part of the Southern Bantoid group, they are part of the Benue–Congo language family, which in turn is part of the large Niger–Congo phylum. The Bantu languages (English:, Proto-Bantu: *bantʊ̀) or Ntu languages (/ⁿtu/), technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorisation which includes other "Bantoid" languages, are a large family of languages spoken by the Bantu peoples throughout Sub-Saharan Africa.
It consists of the Bantu languages (also called Narrow Bantu) along with several small branches and isolates of eastern Nigeria and west-central Cameroon (though the affiliation of some branches is uncertain).

Mbam languages

MbamSanaga
Meanwhile, Ethnologue has added languages to the Guthrie classification which Guthrie overlooked, while removing the Mbam languages (much of zone A), and shifting some languages between groups (much of zones D and E to a new zone J, for example, and part of zone L to K, and part of M to F) in an apparent effort at a semi-genetic, or at least semi-areal, classification.
The Mbam languages are a group of erstwhile zone-A Bantu languages which some lexicostatistical studies suggest are not actually Bantu, but related Southern Bantoid languages.

Demographics of Africa

AfricanAfricansAfrican people
The total number of Bantu speakers is in the hundreds of millions, estimated around 350 million in the mid-2010s (roughly 30% of the total population of Africa, or roughly 5% of world population).
Speakers of Bantu languages (part of the Niger–Congo family) predominate in southern, central and southeast Africa.

Bushong language

BushongBushoongbuf
The Bushong language recorded by Vansina, however, has final consonants, while slurring of the final syllable (though written) is reported as common among the Tonga of Malawi.
Bushong (Bushoong) is a Bantu language of the Kasai region of Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Tonga language (Malawi)

TongaTonga (Nyasa) languageMalawi Tonga language
The Bushong language recorded by Vansina, however, has final consonants, while slurring of the final syllable (though written) is reported as common among the Tonga of Malawi.
Tonga (native name Chitonga) is a Bantu language spoken mainly in the Nkhata Bay District of Malawi.

Tone (linguistics)

tonetonal languagetones
With few exceptions, notably Swahili, Bantu languages are tonal and have two to four register tones.
This is especially common with syllabic nasals, for example in many Bantu and Kru languages, but also occurs in Serbo-Croatian.

Makua languages

MakuaMakhuwaMakhuwa languages
However, a clustering of sounds at the beginning of a syllable can be readily observed in such languages as Shona, and the Makua languages.
The Makua or Makhuwa languages are a branch of Bantu languages spoken primarily in Mozambique.

Luba-Kasai language

TshilubaLuba-KasaiTshiluba language
In a few cases prefixes are used to distinguish languages with the same root in their name, such as Tshiluba and Kiluba (both Luba), Umbundu and Kimbundu (both Mbundu).
Luba-Kasai, also known as Western Luba, Bena-Lulua, Ciluba/Tshiluba, Luba-Lulua or Luva, is a Bantu language (Zone L) of Central Africa and a national language of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, alongside Lingala, Swahili, and Kikongo.

Tswana people

TswanaBatswanaMotswana
So, in the country of Botswana the people are the Batswana, one person is a Motswana, and the language is Setswana; and in Uganda, centred on the kingdom of Buganda, the dominant ethnicity are the Baganda (sg.
The Tswana (Batswana, singular Motswana) are a Bantu-speaking ethnic group who are native to Southern Africa.

Umbundu

(South) MbunduSouth Mbundu languageumb
In a few cases prefixes are used to distinguish languages with the same root in their name, such as Tshiluba and Kiluba (both Luba), Umbundu and Kimbundu (both Mbundu).
Umbundu, or South Mbundu (autonym úmbúndú), one of two Bantu languages of Angola called Mbundu (see Kimbundu), is the most widely spoken language of Angola.

Kimbundu

(North) MbunduKimbundokmb
In a few cases prefixes are used to distinguish languages with the same root in their name, such as Tshiluba and Kiluba (both Luba), Umbundu and Kimbundu (both Mbundu).
Kimbundu, or North Mbundu, one of two Bantu languages called Mbundu (see Umbundu), is the second-most-widely spoken Bantu language in Angola.

Luba-Katanga language

Luba-KatangaKilubalub
In a few cases prefixes are used to distinguish languages with the same root in their name, such as Tshiluba and Kiluba (both Luba), Umbundu and Kimbundu (both Mbundu).
Luba-Katanga, also known as Luba-Shaba and Kiluba, is one of the two major Bantu languages spoken in the Democratic Republic of the Congo called "Luba".

Uganda

UgandanRepublic of UgandaUGA
So, in the country of Botswana the people are the Batswana, one person is a Motswana, and the language is Setswana; and in Uganda, centred on the kingdom of Buganda, the dominant ethnicity are the Baganda (sg.
The people of Uganda were hunter-gatherers until 1,700 to 2,300 years ago, when Bantu-speaking populations migrated to the southern parts of the country.

Nguni languages

NguniNguni languageTekela
The Nguni languages are a group of Bantu languages spoken in Southern Africa by the Nguni people.