Baptism

baptizedbaptisedbaptizechristenedbaptizingbaptismsHoly BaptismbaptismalbaptiseBaptist
Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.wikipedia
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Initiation

initiation riteinitiatedinitiates
Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.
Examples of initiation ceremonies might include Christian baptism or confirmation, Jewish bar or bat mitzvah, acceptance into a fraternal organization, secret society or religious order, or graduation from school or recruit training.

Immersion baptism

immersionbaptism by immersionbaptized
It may be performed by sprinkling or pouring water on the head, or by immersing in water either partially or completely.
Immersion baptism (also known as baptism by immersion or baptism by submersion) is a method of baptism that is distinguished from baptism by affusion (pouring) and by aspersion (sprinkling), sometimes without specifying whether the immersion is total or partial, but very commonly with the indication that the person baptized is immersed completely.

Infant baptism

christeningchristenedbaptism of infants
Baptism is also called christening, although some reserve the word "christening" for the baptism of infants. Much more than half of all Christians baptize infants; many others regard only believer's baptism as true baptism.
Infant baptism is the practice of baptising infants or young children.

Rite

ritesreligious riteRitus
Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.
The 39 Articles of the Anglican Communion and the Articles of Religion of the Methodist Church state "there are two Sacraments ordained of Christ our Lord in the Gospel, that is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord".

Affusion

pouringaffuses
It may be performed by sprinkling or pouring water on the head, or by immersing in water either partially or completely. In the West, this method of baptism began to be replaced by affusion baptism from around the 8th century, but it continues in use in Eastern Christianity.
Affusion (la. affusio) is a method of baptism where water is poured on the head of the person being baptized.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
The synoptic gospels recount that John the Baptist baptised Jesus.
John used baptism as the central symbol or sacrament of his pre-messianic movement.

Baptism of Jesus

baptismBaptism of Christhis baptism
The synoptic gospels recount that John the Baptist baptised Jesus.
Most modern theologians view the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist as a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.

Ordinance (Christianity)

ordinancesordinancechurch ordinance
Baptism is considered a sacrament in most churches, and as an ordinance in others.
Examples include baptism and communion, as practiced in the Christian traditions such as Anabaptists, all Baptist churches, Churches of Christ groups, and Pentecostal churches.

Baptism of desire

''ex votoBaptism by desirebaptized by their desire
Later, the Catholic Church identified a baptism of desire, by which those preparing for baptism who die before actually receiving the sacrament are considered saved.
Baptism of desire (Baptismus flaminis) is a teaching of the Anglican Communion, Lutheran Church and Roman Catholic Church explaining that those who desire baptism, but are not baptized with water through the Christian Sacrament because of death, nevertheless receive the fruits of Baptism at the moment of death if their grace of conversion included "divine and catholic faith", an internal act of perfect charity, and perfect contrition by which their soul was cleansed of all sin.

Believer's baptism

adult baptismbaptizedbelievers baptism
Much more than half of all Christians baptize infants; many others regard only believer's baptism as true baptism.
Believer's baptism (occasionally called credobaptism, from the Latin word credo meaning "I believe") is the Christian practice of baptism as is understood by many evangelical denominations, particularly those that descend from the Anabaptist and English Baptist tradition.

Christian laying on of hands

laying on of handscheirotoniaordained
By the third and fourth centuries, baptism involved catechetical instruction as well as chrismation, exorcisms, laying on of hands, and recitation of a creed.
In Christianity, the laying on of hands (Greek: cheirotonia – χειροτονία, literally, "laying-on of hands") is both a symbolic and formal method of invoking the Holy Spirit primarily during baptisms and confirmations, healing services, blessings, and ordination of priests, ministers, elders, deacons, and other church officers, along with a variety of other church sacraments and holy ceremonies.

Great Commission

The Great CommissioncommissionChrist Commissioning the Apostles
Most Christians baptize "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit" (following the Great Commission), but some baptize in Jesus' name only.
The most famous version of the Great Commission is in Matthew 28:16–20, where on a mountain in Galilee Jesus calls on his followers to make disciples of and baptize all nations in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Aspersion

sprinklingsprinkledaspersed
It may be performed by sprinkling or pouring water on the head, or by immersing in water either partially or completely.
Aspersion is a method used in baptism as an alternative to immersion or affusion.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.
Depending on the specific denomination of Christianity, practices may include baptism, Eucharist (Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper), prayer (including the Lord's Prayer), confession, confirmation, burial rites, marriage rites and the religious education of children.

Anabaptism

AnabaptistAnabaptistsAnabaptist Churches
Anabaptists denied the validity of the practice of infant baptism, and rebaptized converts.
Anabaptism (from Neo-Latin anabaptista, from the Greek ἀναβαπτισμός: ἀνά- "re-" and βαπτισμός "baptism", Täufer, earlier also Wiedertäufer ) is a Christian movement which traces its origins to the Radical Reformation.

Martin Luther

LutherLutheranLuther, Martin
In the sixteenth century, Martin Luther retained baptism as a sacrament, but Swiss reformer Huldrych Zwingli considered baptism and the Lord's supper to be symbolic.
Luther was baptized the next morning on the feast day of St. Martin of Tours.

Baptists

BaptistBaptist ChurchBaptist minister
It has also given its name to the Baptist churches and denominations.
The first Baptist baptism (adult baptism by full immersion) in Ukraine took place in 1864 on the river Inhul in the Yelizavetgrad region (now Kropyvnytskyi region), in a German settlement.

Baptismal regeneration

Regenerationregeneratesaving
Some Christian groups assert baptism is a requirement for salvation and a sacrament, and speak of "baptismal regeneration".
Baptismal regeneration is the name given to doctrines held by major Christian denominations which maintain that salvation is intimately linked to the act of baptism, and that salvation is impossible apart from it.

Eastern Christianity

Eastern ChristianEastern ChurchEastern Churches
In the West, this method of baptism began to be replaced by affusion baptism from around the 8th century, but it continues in use in Eastern Christianity.
In many Eastern churches, some parish priests administer the sacrament of chrismation to infants after baptism, and priests are allowed to marry before ordination.

Latin Church

Latin CatholicWestern ChurchLatin Rite
In the Latin Church of the Catholic Church, baptism by submersion is used in the Ambrosian Rite and is one of the methods provided in the Roman Rite of the baptism of infants.
In the Eastern Churches these sacraments are usually administered immediately after baptism, even for an infant.

Arnoldists

ArnoldistPublicans
Sects such as the Tondrakians, Cathars, Arnoldists, Petrobrusians, Henricans, Brethren of the Free Spirit and the Lollards were regarded as heretics by the Catholic Church.
Arnoldists were a pre-Protestant Christian movement in the 12th century, named after Arnold of Brescia who criticized the great wealth and possessions of the Roman Catholic Church, and preached against baptism and the Eucharist.

Churches of Christ

Church of ChristChristianCampbellite
The Churches of Christ," Jehovah's Witnesses, Christadelphians, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also espouse baptism as necessary for salvation.
Baptism has been recognized as an important rite throughout the history of the Christian Church, but Christian groups differ over the manner in which baptism is administered, the meaning and significance of baptism, its role in salvation, and who is a candidate for baptism.

Catharism

CatharsCatharAlbigensians
Sects such as the Tondrakians, Cathars, Arnoldists, Petrobrusians, Henricans, Brethren of the Free Spirit and the Lollards were regarded as heretics by the Catholic Church.
They also saw John the Baptist, identified also with Elijah, as an evil being sent to hinder Jesus's teaching through the false sacrament of baptism.

Calvinism

CalvinistReformedCalvinists
Reformed and Methodist Protestants maintain a link between baptism and regeneration, but insist that it is not automatic or mechanical, and that regeneration may occur at a different time than baptism.
Scripture was also viewed as a unified whole, which led to a covenantal theology of the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's Supper as visible signs of the covenant of grace.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.
Greek words have been widely borrowed into other languages, including English: mathematics, physics, astronomy, democracy, philosophy, athletics, theatre, rhetoric, baptism, evangelist, etc. Moreover, Greek words and word elements continue to be productive as a basis for coinages: anthropology, photography, telephony, isomer, biomechanics, cinematography, etc. and form, with Latin words, the foundation of international scientific and technical vocabulary like all words ending with –logy ("discourse").