Barangay

barangaysBrgy.barrioUrbanized BarangayIndustrial BarangaybaranggaybarriosBrgys.Barangay Captain42027 barangays
A barangay or baranggay ( (abbreviated as Brgy. or Bgy.), formerly referred to as barrio, is the smallest administrative division in the Philippines and is the native Filipino term for a village, district or ward.wikipedia
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Cities of the Philippines

CityComponentcities
Municipalities and cities in the Philippines are subdivided into barangays, with the exception of the municipalities of Adams in Ilocos Norte and Kalayaan, Palawan which each contain only one barangay.
Cities, like municipalities, are composed of barangays, which can range from urban neighborhoods (such as Brgy.

Village

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A barangay or baranggay ( (abbreviated as Brgy. or Bgy.), formerly referred to as barrio, is the smallest administrative division in the Philippines and is the native Filipino term for a village, district or ward.
Such villages may or may not correspond to a barangay (the country's basic unit of government, also glossed as village), or be privately administered.

Kalayaan, Palawan

KalayaanKalayaan Group of IslandsKalayaan Islands
Municipalities and cities in the Philippines are subdivided into barangays, with the exception of the municipalities of Adams in Ilocos Norte and Kalayaan, Palawan which each contain only one barangay.
It consist of a single barangay located on Pag-asa Island, which also serves as the seat of the municipal government.

Philippines

đŸ‡”đŸ‡­FilipinoPhilippine
A barangay or baranggay ( (abbreviated as Brgy. or Bgy.), formerly referred to as barrio, is the smallest administrative division in the Philippines and is the native Filipino term for a village, district or ward.
These are further divided into 17 regions, 81 provinces, 145 cities, 1,489 municipalities, and 42,036 barangays.

Sitio

sitiosComponent SitioIndependent Sitio
The barangay itself is sometimes informally subdivided into smaller areas called purok (English: "zone"), barangay zones consisting of a cluster of houses, and sitios, which are territorial enclaves—usually rural—far from the barangay center.
A sitio in the Philippines is a territorial enclave that forms part of a barangay.

Purok

puroks
The barangay itself is sometimes informally subdivided into smaller areas called purok (English: "zone"), barangay zones consisting of a cluster of houses, and sitios, which are territorial enclaves—usually rural—far from the barangay center.
Purok (English: District ), also known as zone, is a political subdivision of a barangay.

Adams, Ilocos Norte

Adams
Municipalities and cities in the Philippines are subdivided into barangays, with the exception of the municipalities of Adams in Ilocos Norte and Kalayaan, Palawan which each contain only one barangay.
Adams is composed of only one barangay: Adams Proper.

Barangay state

barangayancient barangaybarangays
Traditionally, the original “barangays” were coastal settlements of the migration of these Malayo-Polynesian people (who came to the archipelago) from other places in Southeast Asia (see chiefdom). Most of the ancient barangays were coastal or riverine in nature.
Historical barangays should not be confused with present-day Philippine barrios, which were officially renamed barangays by the Philippine Local Government Code of 1991 as a reference to historical barangays.

Cabeza de Barangay

cabezas de barangaybarangay captainBrgy. Chairman
Each barangay was headed by the cabeza de barangay (barangay chief), who formed part of the PrincipalĂ­a - the elite ruling class of the municipalities of the Spanish Philippines.
The Cabeça de Barangay (Spanish: head of the barangay), also known as Teniente del Barrio in Spanish, was the leader or chief of a barangay in the Philippines during the Spanish colonial period.

Ilocos Norte

Governor of Ilocos NorteIlocosIlocos Norte Province, Philippines
Municipalities and cities in the Philippines are subdivided into barangays, with the exception of the municipalities of Adams in Ilocos Norte and Kalayaan, Palawan which each contain only one barangay.
Ilocos Norte has 557 barangays comprising its 21 municipalities and 2 cities.

Barangay Captain

Kapitanabarrio lieutenantKapitan
The modern barangay is headed by elected officials, the topmost being the Punong Barangay or the Barangay Chairperson (addressed as Kapitan; also known as the Barangay Captain).
A Barangay Captain (Filipino: Punong Barangay), also known as a Barangay Chairman, is the highest elected official in a barangay, the smallest level of administrative divisions of the Philippines.

History of the Philippines (1521–1898)

Spanish colonial periodSpanish colonial eraSpanish Era
During the Spanish rule, through a resettlement policy called the ReducciĂłn, smaller scattered barangays were consolidated (and thus, "reduced") to form compact towns.

Sangguniang Kabataan

SKSK ChairpersonSangguniang Kabataan Federation
The officials that make up the council are the Punong Barangay, seven Barangay Councilors, and the chairman of Youth Council or Sangguniang Kabataan (SK).
Sangguniang Kabataan (abbreviated as SK; ), is a council meant to represent the youth in each barangay in the Philippines.

1989 Philippine barangay election

Barangaybarangay electionsElections
The first barangay elections held under the new constitution was held on March 28, 1989, under Republic Act number 6679.
Barangay elections were held in the country's roughly 42,000 barangays for the positions of barangay captain and six councilors on March 28, 1989.

Barangay councils in the Philippines

barangay councilSangguniang BarangayBarangay councilor
Later, Rural Councils with four councilors were created to assist, now renamed Barrio Lieutenant; it was later renamed Barrio Council, and then Barangay Council. The Kapitan is aided by the Sangguniang Barangay (Barangay Council) whose members, called Barangay Kagawad ("Councilors"), are also elected.
The Sangguniang Barangay known commonly as the Barangay Council, and formerly as the Rural Council and then the Barrio Council, is the legislative body of a barangay, the lowest elected government in the Philippines.

Administrative divisions of the Philippines

local government unitsadministrative divisionsLGU
The council is considered to be a Local Government Unit (LGU), similar to the Provincial and the Municipal Government.
4) Barangays (also known as barrio)

Barangay elections

Barangay
Barangay elections are non-partisan and are typically hotly contested.
Barangay elections are elections in the Philippines in the barangay s or villages, the smallest government administrative divisions of the Philippines.

Katarungang Pambarangay

lupong tagapamayapa
The Barangay Justice System or Katarungang Pambarangay is composed of members commonly known as Lupon Tagapamayapa (Justice of the peace).
It is operated by the smallest of the local government units, the barangay, and is overseen by the barangay captain, the highest elected official of the barangay and its executive.

Barangay Kagawad

kagawadSangguniang Barangay memberbarangay councilor
The Kapitan is aided by the Sangguniang Barangay (Barangay Council) whose members, called Barangay Kagawad ("Councilors"), are also elected.
A Barangay Kagawad, abbreviated as Kgwd., known in English as a Barangay Councilor and in Filipino as a konsehal ng barangay, is an elected government official who is a member of the Sangguniang Barangay, or Barangay Council, of a particular barangay.

Barrio

neighbourhoodBarriosneighborhood
The Spanish term barrio (abbv.
In the Philippines, the term barrio once referred to a rural village, but it was changed by law in 1975 to the term barangay, the basic unit of government with an average population of 2,500 people.

Ferdinand Marcos

MarcosFerdinand E. MarcosPresident Ferdinand Marcos
"Bo.") was used for much of the 20th century until 1974, when President Ferdinand Marcos ordered their renaming to barangays. The name survived the 1986 EDSA Revolution, though older people would still use the term barrio.
It aimed to promote the economic development of the barangays by encouraging its residents to engage in their own livelihood projects.

Barangay hall

hallseat of government
The barangay is often governed from its seat of local government, the barangay hall.
A barangay hall is the seat of local government for the barangay, the lowest elected administrative division of the Philippines, below that of a Philippine city or Philippine municipality.

Datu

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This position was inherited from the first datus, and came to be known as such during the Spanish regime.
In other parts of the Archipelago, even though the majority of these barangays were not large settlements, yet they had organized societies dominated by the same type of recognized aristocracy and Lordships (with birthright claim to allegiance from followers), as those found in more established, richer and more developed Principalities.

Provinces of the Philippines

provinceprovincesprovince of the Philippines
For the total number of barangays per province, see Provinces of the Philippines#List of provinces.
Every SP has designated seats for ex officio members, given to the respective local presidents of the Association of Barangay Captains (ABC), Philippine Councilors' League (PCL), and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK; "Youth Council").

At-large

at largeAt-Large DistrictsSenator at-large
Councilors are elected by plurality-at-large voting with the entire barangay as a single at-large district.
Sangguniang Kabataan (Youth Council), Sangguniang Barangay (Barangay) (village) Council, Sangguniang Bayan (Municipal Councils) and some Sangguniang Panlungsod (City Councils) all elect members with each local government unit acting as one at-large district.