Barbara La Marr

Barbara La Marr (born Reatha Dale Watson; July 28, 1896 – January 30, 1926) was an American film actress and screenwriter who appeared in 27 films during her career between 1920 and 1926.wikipedia
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The Prisoner of Zenda (1922 film)

The Prisoner of Zenda19221922 version
After two further career-boosting films with star director Rex Ingram (his version of The Prisoner of Zenda and the Gothic drama Trifling Women, both with Ramon Novarro), La Marr signed on with Arthur H. Sawyer to make several featuring, and later starring, films for various studios, including The Hero (1923), Souls for Sale (1923), and The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), the first and last of which she co-wrote.
He encounters an acquaintance on the train there, Antoinette de Mauban (Barbara La Marr), the mistress of the king's treacherous brother, Grand Duke 'Black' Michael (Stuart Holmes).

Trifling Women

After two further career-boosting films with star director Rex Ingram (his version of The Prisoner of Zenda and the Gothic drama Trifling Women, both with Ramon Novarro), La Marr signed on with Arthur H. Sawyer to make several featuring, and later starring, films for various studios, including The Hero (1923), Souls for Sale (1923), and The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), the first and last of which she co-wrote.
It is credited with boosting the careers of its leads, Barbara La Marr and Ramon Novarro.

The Hero (1923 film)

The HeroThe Hero'' (1923 film)
After two further career-boosting films with star director Rex Ingram (his version of The Prisoner of Zenda and the Gothic drama Trifling Women, both with Ramon Novarro), La Marr signed on with Arthur H. Sawyer to make several featuring, and later starring, films for various studios, including The Hero (1923), Souls for Sale (1923), and The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), the first and last of which she co-wrote.
The Hero is a 1923 American silent drama film directed by Louis J. Gasnier and starring Gaston Glass, Barbara La Marr and John St. Polis.

The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924 film)

The Shooting of Dan McGrewThe Shooting of Dan McGrew'' (1924 film)
After two further career-boosting films with star director Rex Ingram (his version of The Prisoner of Zenda and the Gothic drama Trifling Women, both with Ramon Novarro), La Marr signed on with Arthur H. Sawyer to make several featuring, and later starring, films for various studios, including The Hero (1923), Souls for Sale (1923), and The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), the first and last of which she co-wrote.
Barbara La Marr as The lady known as Lou Lorraine

Souls for Sale

After two further career-boosting films with star director Rex Ingram (his version of The Prisoner of Zenda and the Gothic drama Trifling Women, both with Ramon Novarro), La Marr signed on with Arthur H. Sawyer to make several featuring, and later starring, films for various studios, including The Hero (1923), Souls for Sale (1923), and The Shooting of Dan McGrew (1924), the first and last of which she co-wrote.
Her actress friend from the desert shoot, Leva Lemaire (Barbara La Marr), persuades Claymore to give her a screen test for the only uncast role in his next production: a comic part.

The Nut (1921 film)

The NutThe Nut'' (1921 film)
She was finally properly "discovered" by Douglas Fairbanks who gave her a prominent role in The Nut (1921) then cast her as Milady de Winter in his production of The Three Musketeers (1921).
Barbara La Marr as Claudine Dupree

The Land of Jazz

She was credited as writer Barbara La Marr Deely on the films The Mother of His Children, The Rose of Nome, Flame of Youth, The Little Grey Mouse, and The Land of Jazz (all released in 1920).
Directed by Jules Furthman and written by Barbara La Marr, it starred Eileen Percy and Ruth Stonehouse.

Milady de Winter

MiladyCountess de WinterLady Sabine DeWinter
She was finally properly "discovered" by Douglas Fairbanks who gave her a prominent role in The Nut (1921) then cast her as Milady de Winter in his production of The Three Musketeers (1921).
Barbara La Marr in The Three Musketeers (1921)

Yakima, Washington

YakimaYakima, WANorth Yakima, Washington
Born in Yakima, Washington, La Marr spent her early life in the Pacific Northwest before relocating with her family to California when she was a teenager.
Barbara La Marr, actress and writer

The Three Musketeers (1921 film)

The Three Musketeers1921Douglas Fairbanks' version
She was finally properly "discovered" by Douglas Fairbanks who gave her a prominent role in The Nut (1921) then cast her as Milady de Winter in his production of The Three Musketeers (1921).
Barbara La Marr as Milady de Winter

The Eternal City (1923 film)

The Eternal Cityin 1923remake
She starred, in the lead role, opposite Bert Lytell and Lionel Barrymore in The Eternal City (1923), which featured a cameo appearance by Benito Mussolini.
The Eternal City (1923) is a silent film directed by George Fitzmaurice, from a script by Ouida Bergère based on a Hall Caine novel, starring Barbara La Marr, Lionel Barrymore and Bert Lytell.

Sandra (1924 film)

Sandra
The same year, her first starring, above-the-title role came in the drama Sandra, from First National Pictures, which she filmed in New York City in August 1924.
Sandra is a lost 1924 drama film directed by Arthur H. Sawyer and starring Barbara La Marr and Bert Lytell.

The Girl from Montmartre

La Marr's final screenplay, My Husband's Wives, was finally produced by Fox in 1924, arriving in theatres shortly after the release of Sandra, and before the production of what proved to be her final three films: The Heart of a Siren (a mixed reception), The White Monkey (a critical failure), and The Girl from Montmartre (a critical success, albeit posthumously released).
The Girl from Montmartre is a 1926 silent film romantic drama film directed by Alfred E. Green and starring Barbara La Marr, in her last film role.

Thy Name Is Woman

1924
In 1924, during the filming of Thy Name Is Woman, production supervisor Irving Thalberg made regular visits to the set to ensure that La Marr's alcohol consumption was not interfering with the shoot.
Thy Name Is Woman is a 1924 American silent drama film directed by Fred Niblo and starring Ramon Novarro and Barbara La Marr.

ZaSu Pitts

During her final illness, La Marr entrusted the care of her son to her close friend, actress ZaSu Pitts, and Pitts' husband, film executive Tom Gallery.
The couple had two children: Ann Gallery (born 1922) and Donald Michael "Sonny" Gallery (né Marvin Carville La Marr), whom they adopted and renamed after the 1926 death of Donald's mother (and Pitts' friend), silent film actress Barbara La Marr.

My Husband's Wives

La Marr's final screenplay, My Husband's Wives, was finally produced by Fox in 1924, arriving in theatres shortly after the release of Sandra, and before the production of what proved to be her final three films: The Heart of a Siren (a mixed reception), The White Monkey (a critical failure), and The Girl from Montmartre (a critical success, albeit posthumously released).
My Husband's Wives is a 1924 American silent drama film directed by Maurice Elvey, adapted by Dorothy Yost from a scenario by Barbara La Marr, and starring Shirley Mason, Bryant Washburn, and Evelyn Brent.

Strangers of the Night

She also had a supporting part in the Fred Niblo-directed comedy Strangers of the Night, and was noted in a New York Times review for her "capable" performance.
Barbara La Marr as Anna Valeska

The Brass Bottle (1923 film)

The Brass Bottle1923The Brass Bottle'' (1923 film)
In 1923, she appeared in the comedy The Brass Bottle portraying the role of the Queen, and Poor Men's Wives.
Barbara La Marr as The Queen

Hedy Lamarr

Lamarr, HedyHedley LamarrHedy Kiesler
Producer Louis B. Mayer, a longtime admirer of La Marr, named actress Hedy Lamarr after her.
Mayer persuaded her to change her name to Hedy Lamarr (to distance herself from her real identity, and "the Ecstasy lady" reputation associated with it), choosing the surname in homage to the beautiful silent film star, Barbara La Marr, on the suggestion of his wife, who admired La Marr.

The White Monkey

film of the same name
It stars Barbara La Marr, Thomas Holding, and Henry Victor, and was released on June 7, 1925.

Cinderella of the Hills

Cinderella of the Hills is a lost 1921 silent film directed by Howard M. Mitchell and starring Barbara Bedford and Barbara La Marr.

Desperate Trails (1921 film)

Desperate TrailsDesperate Trails'' (1921 film)
Barbara La Marr as Lady Lou