Barbera

Barbera d'AlbaBarbera del Monferrato
Barbera is a red Italian wine grape variety that, as of 2000, was the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy (after Sangiovese and Montepulciano).wikipedia
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List of grape varieties

grape varietygrape varietiesgrape
Barbera is a red Italian wine grape variety that, as of 2000, was the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy (after Sangiovese and Montepulciano).

Piemonte (wine)

PiedmontPiedmont winePiemonte
The best known appellation is the DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) Barbera d'Asti in the Piedmont region: the highest-quality Nizza DOCG wines are produced within a sub-zone of the Barbera d'Asti production area.
Other popular grapes used for red wine production are Barbera and Dolcetto.

Nizza DOCG

Nizza
The best known appellation is the DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) Barbera d'Asti in the Piedmont region: the highest-quality Nizza DOCG wines are produced within a sub-zone of the Barbera d'Asti production area.
It is made from the Barbera grape, and the zone of production is limited to the comuni (municipalities) of Agliano Terme, Belveglio, Bruno, Calamandrana, Castel Boglione, Castelnuovo Belbo, Castelnuovo Calcea, Castel Rocchero, Cortiglione, Incisa Scapaccino, Moasca, Mombaruzzo, Mombercelli, Nizza Monferrato, Rocchetta Palafea, San Marzano Oliveto, Vaglio Serra and Vinchio within the province of Asti.

Barbera d'Asti

Barbera d'Asti Superiore
The best known appellation is the DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) Barbera d'Asti in the Piedmont region: the highest-quality Nizza DOCG wines are produced within a sub-zone of the Barbera d'Asti production area.
Barbera d'Asti is an Italian red wine made from the Barbera grape variety.

Montepulciano (grape)

Montepulciano Montepulciano grapeMonte Pulciano
Barbera is a red Italian wine grape variety that, as of 2000, was the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy (after Sangiovese and Montepulciano).

Acids in wine

acidityacidacidity levels
It produces good yields and is known for deep color, full body, low tannins and high levels of acid.
Its concentration varies depending on the grape variety, with some varieties, such as Barbera, Carignan and Sylvaner, being naturally disposed to high levels.

Nebbiolo

Marchesana
In Piedmont, the vine was prized for its yields and ability to ripen two weeks earlier than Nebbiolo even on vineyard sites with less than ideal exposure.
With vast swaths of vineyards devastated by the louse, some vineyard owners decided to replant with different grape varieties, with Barbera being a significant beneficiary.

Dolcetto

Dolcetto di DoglianiDolcetto d'AlbaBignonia (grape)
Harvest for Barbera usually takes place in late September-early October, usually two weeks after Dolcetto has been picked.
Most Dolcetto is found in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy, where many of the top estates produce Dolcetto on less favored sites as an "early to market wine" to generate some income for the winery while the Nebbiolo and Barbera are being matured.

Italian wine

ItalyItalianItalian wines
Barbera is a red Italian wine grape variety that, as of 2000, was the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy (after Sangiovese and Montepulciano).

Piedmont

PiemontePiemontPiedmont, Italy
Barbera is believed to have originated in the hills of Monferrato in central Piemonte, Italy, where it has been known from the thirteenth century.
Indigenous grape varieties include Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto, Freisa, Grignolino and Brachetto.

California wine

CaliforniaCalifornianCalifornian wine
In the 19th and 20th centuries, waves of Italian immigrants brought Barbera to the Americas where the vine took root in California and Argentina among other places.
Other important red wine grapes include Barbera, Cabernet Franc, Carignan, Grenache, Malbec, Mourvèdre, Petite Sirah, Petit Verdot, Sangiovese, and Tannat.

Montferrat

MonferratoBasso MonferratoMonferrat
Barbera is believed to have originated in the hills of Monferrato in central Piemonte, Italy, where it has been known from the thirteenth century.

Lombardia (wine)

LombardyLombardy wineLombardia
However, one ampelographer, Pierre Viala, speculates that Barbera originated in the Lombardy region of Oltrepò Pavese.
In addition to sparkling wines, the Oltrepò Pavese also produces red wines from the Pinot nero, Barbera, Croatina, Uva Rara and Vespolina.

Alba, Piedmont

AlbaAlba PompeiaAlba, Italy
This allowed the Piedmontese winemakers in regions like Alba to give their best sites over to the more difficult to cultivate Nebbiolo and still produce quality wine with Barbera that could be consumed earlier while the Nebbiolo ages.

New World wine

New WorldNew World winesnew
Northwest Italy is the viticultural home for Barbera, but Italian immigrants spread it through much of the New World, where its acidity is valued in blended wines for the 'freshness' it imparts.
Malbec has proven to be the most successful variety in export markets, with Barbera and "Bonarda" (now known to be Corbeau, a minor variety from Savoie) being blended into more affordable wines.

Merlot

White MerlotBini (grape)Higney
John Gladstones, in his book Viticulture and Environment, includes Barbera in maturity group 5, which means that it will ripen at about the same time as Shiraz and Merlot, and that it should theoretically find a successful home in many Australian wine regions.
Grape breeders have used Merlot crossed with other grapes to create several new varieties including Carmine (an Olmo grape made by crossing a Carignan x Cabernet Sauvignon cross with Merlot), Ederena (with Abouriou), Evmolpia (with Mavrud), Fertilia (with Raboso Veronese), Mamaia (a Romanian wine grape made by crossing a Muscat Ottonel x Babeasca negra cross with Merlot), Nigra (with Barbera), Prodest (with Barbera) and Rebo (with Teroldego).

Grignolino

Neretto di Marengo
In the Monferrato DOC, Barbera is blended with up to 15% Freisa, Grignolino and Dolcetto and can be slightly sparkling.
These light bodied, pale colored wines are made to be consumed young and while waiting for the brawnier, Nebbiolo and Barbera based wines of the region age.

Croatina

Bonarda
Elsewhere in Lombardy it is blended with Croatina and as part of a larger blend component in the red wines of Franciacorta.
However Croatina is often blended with Barbera, as in Gutturnio, a wine from Emilia-Romagna containing 30.0% – 45.0% Croatina.

Colli Piacentini

GutturnioBonardaColli Piacentini DOC
As in Lombardy, Barbera is often softened by blending with the lighter Croatina as it is in the Val Tidone region for the DOC wine of Gutturnio.
The most famous of these is the Gutturnio DOC, a wine made predominately from Barbera that is the only main sub-region dedicated to red wine production.

Barbera del Sannio

Despite similarities in names Barbera has no close genetic relationship with the Campanian wine grape Barbera del Sannio or the Sardinian wine grape Barbera Sarda.
Despite the similarities in name and appearance, the grape has no close genetic relationship with the Piedmont wine grapes Barbera or Barbera bianca or the Sardinian wine grape Barbera Sarda and is, instead, more closely related to the Campanian varieties Casavecchia and Catalanesca and the Apulian grape Nero di Troia.

Slovenian wine

SloveniaSlovenianSlovene wine
Although Barbera plantings of over 12500 ha existed as of 2010 outside Italy, it is rarely found in Europe except for small plantings in Greece, Romania, and the coastal region of Primorska in Slovenia.
Other grapes found throughout the Littoral region include Barbera, Beli Pinot (Beli Burgundec), Cabernet Franc, Cipro, Glera, Klarnica, Laški Rizling, Maločrn, Rumeni Muškat, Syrah and Vitovska Grganja.

List of Italian grape varieties

Italian grape varietiesItalian grape varietyItalian wine grape varieties

Barbera bianca

Martinetta
Also, DNA analysis has shown that the white Piedmont variety Barbera bianca is a not a color mutation of Barbera but rather its own distinct variety.
Despite being named Barbera bianca, the grape is not a color mutation of the red Piedmontese wine grape Barbera that is the third most widely planted grape variety in Italy.

Albarossa

Along with Nebbiolo di Dronero (originally thought to be Nebbiolo but later discovered to be an old French wine grape known as Chatus), Dalmasso crossed Barbera to produce Albarossa, Cornarea, Nebbiera, San Michele and Soperga.
Dalmasso originally thought he created the grape from a crossing of Nebbiolo and Barbera but DNA profiling in 2009 confirmed that the "Nebbiolo" vine used wasn't Nebbiolo at all but rather a very old French wine grape variety from the Ardèche, Chatus.

Victorian wine

VictoriaPort Phillip, VictoriaWine regions
It has been grown for about 25 years in the Mudgee region of New South Wales, with later plantings in a number of wine regions, including the King Valley in Victoria as well as the McLaren Vale and the Adelaide Hills regions in South Australia.