Bark scale

Bark
The Bark scale is a psychoacoustical scale proposed by Eberhard Zwicker in 1961.wikipedia
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Psychoacoustics

psychoacousticpsychoacoustic modelpsychoacoustical
The Bark scale is a psychoacoustical scale proposed by Eberhard Zwicker in 1961.
Other scales have been derived directly from experiments on human hearing perception, such as the mel scale and Bark scale (these are used in studying perception, but not usually in musical composition), and these are approximately logarithmic in frequency at the high-frequency end, but nearly linear at the low-frequency end.

Mel scale

Mel
It is related to, but somewhat less popular than, the mel scale, a perceptual scale of pitches judged by listeners to be equal in distance from one another.
Bark scale

Equivalent rectangular bandwidth

ERB-rateERB-rate scale
Equivalent rectangular bandwidth, the ERB scale
Bark scale

Scale (music)

scalescalesmusical scale
The Bark scale is a psychoacoustical scale proposed by Eberhard Zwicker in 1961. It is related to, but somewhat less popular than, the mel scale, a perceptual scale of pitches judged by listeners to be equal in distance from one another.

Eberhard Zwicker

The Bark scale is a psychoacoustical scale proposed by Eberhard Zwicker in 1961.

Heinrich Barkhausen

BarkhausenBarkhausen, HeinrichHeinrich Georg Barkhausen
It is named after Heinrich Barkhausen who proposed the first subjective measurements of loudness.

Logarithmic scale

logarithmiclogarithmic unitlog
One definition of the term is "...a frequency scale on which equal distances correspond with perceptually equal distances. Above about 500 Hz this scale is more or less equal to a logarithmic frequency axis. Below 500 Hz the Bark scale becomes more and more linear."

Hearing

auditoryauralauditory perception
The scale ranges from 1 to 24 and corresponds to the first 24 critical bands of hearing.

Pitch (music)

pitchpitchestone
It is related to, but somewhat less popular than, the mel scale, a perceptual scale of pitches judged by listeners to be equal in distance from one another.

Luminosity function

amount of lighthuman eyehuman perception of brightness
Luminosity function, which describes the average sensitivity of the human eye to light of different wavelengths.

Fletcher–Munson curves

Fletcher and MunsonFletcher–Munsonloudness
Fletcher–Munson curves

Critical band

critical bandsauditory filters
The scale ranges from 1 to 24 and corresponds to the first 24 critical bands of hearing.

Pink noise

1/f noisepink1/''f'' noise
The human auditory system, which processes frequencies in a roughly logarithmic fashion approximated by the Bark scale, does not perceive different frequencies with equal sensitivity; signals around 1–4 kHz sound loudest for a given intensity.

Sound localization

binaural hearingsound localisationbinaural
The hearing range is segmented into 24 critical bands, each with a width of 1 Bark or 100 Mel.

1961 in science

19611962
Bark scale by German acoustics scientist Eberhard Zwicker.

Formant

formantsF2formant frequencies
1. Two alternatives to the Mel scale are the Bark scale and the ERB-rate scale.

List of German inventions and discoveries

German finery process
Bark scale by Eberhard Zwicker in 1961. It is named after Heinrich Barkhausen.

Barks

Bark scale, a psychoacoustical scale proposed by Eberhard Zwicker and named after Heinrich Barkhausen