Barnstorming

barnstormerflying circusbarnstormersbarnstormedbarn-stormingbarnstorming flying circusdaredevil flyingexhibitionflying circusesstunt flyer
Barnstorming was a form of entertainment in which stunt pilots performed tricks—either individually or in groups called flying circuses.wikipedia
271 Related Articles

Charles Lindbergh

Charles A. LindberghLindberghCharles
Barnstormers were pilots who flew throughout the country selling airplane rides and performing stunts; Charles Lindbergh first began flying in this capacity.
To gain flight experience and earn money for further instruction, Lindbergh left Lincoln in June to spend the next few months barnstorming across Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana as a wing walker and parachutist.

Lincoln Beachey

Lincoln J. BeacheyLincoln BeachyBeachey
The Wright brothers and Glenn Curtiss had early flying exhibition teams, with solo flyers like Lincoln Beachey and Didier Masson also popular before World War I, but barnstorming did not become a formal phenomenon until the 1920s.
Lincoln Beachey (March 3, 1887 – March 14, 1915) was a pioneer American aviator and barnstormer.

Curtiss JN-4

Curtiss JennyJN-4Curtiss JN-4 Jenny
During World War I, the United States manufactured a significant number of Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" biplanes to train its military aviators and almost every U.S. airman learned to fly using the plane.
Thousands of surplus Jennys were sold at bargain prices to private owners in the years after the war and became central to the barnstorming era that helped awaken the U.S. to civil aviation through much of the 1920s.

Didier Masson

Pierre Didier Masson
The Wright brothers and Glenn Curtiss had early flying exhibition teams, with solo flyers like Lincoln Beachey and Didier Masson also popular before World War I, but barnstorming did not become a formal phenomenon until the 1920s.
Among his adventures was his life as a pioneering barnstormer, being the second flier in history to bomb a surface warship, as well as combat service in the Lafayette Escadrille with Edwin C. Parsons and Charles Nungesser.

Aerobatics

aerobaticstunt pilotaerobatic team
Barnstorming was a form of entertainment in which stunt pilots performed tricks—either individually or in groups called flying circuses.
In the early days of flying, some pilots used their aircraft as part of a flying circus to entertain.

Clyde Pangborn

Clyde Edward PangbornPangborn, Clyde
Clyde Pangborn, who was pilot of the two-man aviation team who were the first to cross the Pacific Ocean nonstop in 1931, ended his barnstorming career in 1931.
Clyde Edward Pangborn (c. October 28, 1895 – March 29, 1958; aged 62) also known as "Upside-Down Pangborn" was an American aviator and barnstormer who performed aerial stunts in the 1920s.

Bessie Coleman

Bessie "Queen Bess" ColemanColemanColeman, Bessie
Barnstorming was performed not only by former military men, but also by women, minorities, and women minorities (e.g., Bessie Coleman).
With the age of commercial flight still a decade or more in the future, Coleman quickly realized that in order to make a living as a civilian aviator she would have to become a "barnstorming" stunt flier, performing dangerous tricks in the then still early technology of airplanes for paying audiences.

History of aviation

aviation historyhuman flighthistory of flight
Barnstorming was the first major form of civil aviation in the history of aviation.
Many American pilots became barnstormers, flying into small towns across the country and showing off their flying abilities, as well as taking paying passengers for rides.

Doug Davis (aviator)

Doug DavisDouglas H. Davis
Douglas Henry Davis (November 12, 1899 or some time in 1900 – September 3, 1934 ) was an early American aviator, barnstormer, air racer, flight instructor and commercial pilot.

Wing walking

wing walkerwing-walkingwing walk
Stunt pilots performed a variety of aerobatic maneuvers, including spins, dives, loop-the-loops and barrel rolls, while aerialists performed feats of wing walking, stunt parachuting, midair plane transfers, or even playing tennis, target shooting, and dancing on the plane's wings.
Wing walking was seen as an extreme form of barnstorming, and wing walkers would constantly take up the challenge of outdoing one another.

United States government role in civil aviation

Civil Aeronautics AdministrationBureau of Air CommerceCAA
In 1925, the U.S. government began regulating aviation, when it passed the Contract Air Mail Act, which allowed the U.S. Post Office to hire private airlines to deliver mail, with payments based on the weight of the mail.
A succession of accidents during the pre-war exhibition era (1910–16) and barnstorming decade of the 1920s gave way to early forms of federal regulation intended to instill public confidence in the safety of air transportation.

John Moisant

John Bevins MoisantJohn B. MoisantMoisant International Aviators
He also co-founded a prominent flying circus, the Moisant International Aviators.

Pancho Barnes

Florence Lowe "Pancho" BarnesFlorence "Pancho" BarnesFlorence Barnes
Barnes ran an ad-hoc barnstorming show and competed in air races.

Roscoe Turner

In October 1919, Turner went into partnership with Harry J. Runser, who had already been barnstorming with a Canuck biplane, a Canadian version of the Curtiss JN-4 Jenny, and who needed someone to act as mechanic, wing-walker and parachutist.

Ernst Udet

Dr.-Ing. h.c. Ernst UdetUdet Flugzeugbau
Udet spent the 1920s and early 1930s as a stunt pilot, international barnstormer, light aircraft manufacturer, and playboy.

Wiley Post

Mae LainePost, Wiley H.Post-Rogers crash
Post's aviation career began at age 26 as a parachutist for a flying circus, Burrell Tibbs and His Texas Topnotch Fliers, and he became well known on the barnstorming circuit.

Dean Smith (pilot)

Dean SmithDean Cullom SmithDean C. Smith
Subsequently, Smith flew as a barnstormer for about a year at carnivals.

Round the Bend (novel)

Round the Bend
The novel starts with Cutter's boyhood—he gets a job with the Alan Cobham "National Aviation Day" flying circus, of barnstorming aircraft which take customers up for short joyrides, with other entertainment provided.

Ace Eli and Rodger of the Skies

The film centers on a barnstorming pilot (Cliff Robertson) and his son (Eric Shea) as they fly around the United States in the 1920s, having adventures along the way.

Lillian Boyer

In December 1921, she began a 5-month training with pilot Lt. Billy Brock, former World War I pilot and barnstormer.

Alan Cobham

Sir Alan CobhamCobham's Flying CircusAlan Cobham's National Aviation Day displays
In 1932 he started the National Aviation Day displays – a combination of barnstorming and joyriding.

The Great Waldo Pepper

The Great Waldo Pepper depicts barnstorming during the 1920s and the accidents that led to aviation regulations by the Air Commerce Act.

The Gypsy Moths

The film tells the story of three barnstorming skydivers and their effect on a Midwestern American town, focusing on the differences in values between the town folk and the hard-living skydivers.

William Carpenter Lambert

William C. LambertWilliam Lambert
After the war, Lambert did some barnstorming in the Ironton, Ohio area and worked as an engineer.