Barnum Brown

Brown
Barnum Brown (February 12, 1873 – February 5, 1963), commonly referred to as Mr. Bones, was an American paleontologist.wikipedia
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Tyrannosaurus

Tyrannosaurus rexT-RexT. rex
Named after the circus showman P. T. Barnum, he discovered the first documented remains of Tyrannosaurus during a career that made him one of the most famous fossil hunters working from the late Victorian era into the early 20th century.
Barnum Brown, assistant curator of the American Museum of Natural History, found the first partial skeleton of Tyrannosaurus Rex in eastern Wyoming in 1900.

Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park

Dry Island
In 1910, in one of their most significant finds, Brown's team uncovered several hind feet from a group of Albertosaurus in Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park.
The park contains the most important Albertosaurus bone bed in the world, which was first discovered by Barnum Brown in 1910 and rediscovered by Dr. Phil Currie in 1997.

Albertosaurus

Albertosaurus sarcophagusAlbertosaurus arctunguis(''Albertosaurus sarcophagus
In 1910, in one of their most significant finds, Brown's team uncovered several hind feet from a group of Albertosaurus in Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park.
On 11 August 1910, American paleontologist Barnum Brown discovered the remains of a large group of Albertosaurus at another quarry alongside the Red Deer River.

American Museum of Natural History

AMNHMuseum of Natural HistoryThe American Museum of Natural History
Sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), Brown traversed the country bargaining and trading for fossils. For years the fossils were largely forgotten in the recesses of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Hell Creek Formation

Hell CreekHell Creek, MontanaHell Creek Fossil Area
After working a handful of years in Wyoming for AMNH in the late 1890s, Brown led an expedition to the Hell Creek Formation of Southeastern Montana.

Philip J. Currie

Phil CurrieCurriePhilip John Currie
In the 1990s, Dr. Phil Currie, then Head of Dinosaur Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Canada, relocated the site of the bones using only an old photograph as a guide.
However, circumstantial evidence came when he tracked down a site mentioned by Barnum Brown that featured 12 specimens of Albertosaurus from various age groups.

T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous

There was a homage to Brown in the 1998 IMAX film T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous, in which he was played by actor Laurie Murdoch.
These include dinosaur painter Charles Knight (Tuck Milligan) and paleontologist Barnum Brown (Laurie Murdoch), arguably one of the most famous paleontologists in early fossil-hunting history.

Oxford, New York

Oxfordtown of OxfordOxford (town), New York
Brown was buried in Oxford, New York, the hometown of his first wife.

Amphipithecus

Amphipithecus mogaungensis
He named the holotype Amphipithecus mogaungensis, or the ape-like creature of Mogaung.
In early 1923, notable fossil prospector, Barnum Brown (famed for discovering the first Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton) traveled with his wife Lilian Brown to Yangon, the capital of Myanmar.

P. T. Barnum

P.T. BarnumBarnumPT Barnum
Named after the circus showman P. T. Barnum, he discovered the first documented remains of Tyrannosaurus during a career that made him one of the most famous fossil hunters working from the late Victorian era into the early 20th century.

Wyoming

WYState of WyomingWyoming, USA
After working a handful of years in Wyoming for AMNH in the late 1890s, Brown led an expedition to the Hell Creek Formation of Southeastern Montana.

Montana

MTState of MontanaMontana, USA
After working a handful of years in Wyoming for AMNH in the late 1890s, Brown led an expedition to the Hell Creek Formation of Southeastern Montana. After nearly a decade in Montana, Brown headed to Alberta, Canada, and the Red Deer River near Drumheller.

Alberta

Alberta, CanadaABAlberta Transportation
After nearly a decade in Montana, Brown headed to Alberta, Canada, and the Red Deer River near Drumheller.

Red Deer River

Red DeerRed Deer River (Alberta)
After nearly a decade in Montana, Brown headed to Alberta, Canada, and the Red Deer River near Drumheller.

Drumheller

Drumheller, AlbertaDrumheller, Alberta.Kneehill, Alberta
After nearly a decade in Montana, Brown headed to Alberta, Canada, and the Red Deer River near Drumheller.

Flatboat

flatboatsflat boatflat
There, Brown and his crew spent the middle 1910s floating down the river on a flatboat, stopping along the way to prospect for fossils at promising-looking sites.

Charles Hazelius Sternberg

Charles H. SternbergSternbergCharles Sternberg
Trying to outdo them along the same stretch of river was the famous Sternberg family of fossil hunters.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
For years the fossils were largely forgotten in the recesses of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Royal Tyrrell MuseumTMPRoyal Tyrell Museum
In the 1990s, Dr. Phil Currie, then Head of Dinosaur Research at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Canada, relocated the site of the bones using only an old photograph as a guide.

University of Alberta

AlbertaAlberta UniversityThe University of Alberta
However, after Currie took a new job at the University of Alberta, a new crew began working at the site in 2006, intending to continue for several years.

IMAX

IMAX 3DOMNIMAXIMAX Theater
There was a homage to Brown in the 1998 IMAX film T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous, in which he was played by actor Laurie Murdoch.

Yangon

RangoonYangon, MyanmarRangoon, Burma
In early 1923, Brown travelled with his then-wife Lilian to Yangon, the capital of what was then Burma.

Sandstone

sandstonesred sandstoneSandstein
Brown focused his fossil prospection along areas of Pondaung Sandstone.

Mogaung

MogoungMong Kawng
A mandible with three teeth was recorded and catalogued at an exposure of sandstone outside of the town of Mogaung.

Edwin H. Colbert

Edwin Harris ColbertEdwin ColbertColbert
He did not recognise the significance of his find until 14 years later, when Edwin H. Colbert, of the American Museum of Natural History, identified the fossil as a new species of primate and the earliest known anthropoid in the world.