Baro Ferret

BaroPierre FerretFerretFerret BrothersMatelo FerretPierre "Baro" Ferret
Pierre Joseph "Baro" Ferret (1908–1976) was a Gypsy jazz guitarist and composer.wikipedia
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Gypsy jazz

gypsy swingjazz manouchegypsy-jazz
Pierre Joseph "Baro" Ferret (1908–1976) was a Gypsy jazz guitarist and composer.
The group included the brothers Baro, Sarane, and Matelo Ferret and Reinhardt's brother Joseph "Nin-Nin" Reinhardt.

Matelo Ferret

Jean "Matelo" FerretJean FerretMatelo
Through his brother Jean "Matelo" Ferret, Baro met Django Reinhardt, and the two became both friends and notorious rivals.
He was an associate of Django Reinhardt and the brother of guitarists Baro and Sarane Ferret.

Sarane Ferret

Etienne "Sarane" FerretEtienne FerretSarane
From 1931, the Ferret brothers, along with their third brother Etienne "Sarane" Ferret, and cousin René "Challain" Ferret, were favorite sidemen of Reinhardt.
Étienne "Sarane" Ferret (1912–1970) (surname also later spelled Ferré on occasion) was a French musette and gypsy jazz guitarist and composer, a contemporary and musical associate of Django Reinhardt, and the brother of noted Gitan (gypsy) guitar players Baro and Matelo Ferret.

René Didi Duprat

Didi Duprat
The Ferret brothers played with musicians including Didi Duprat.
In 1958 he toured with Yves Montand, and later with the Ferret brothers, Tony Muréna, Juliette Gréco, Dalida and Marlene Dietrich.

Django Reinhardt

DjangoJean "Django" ReinhardtSwing 42
Through his brother Jean "Matelo" Ferret, Baro met Django Reinhardt, and the two became both friends and notorious rivals.
The first four are now available on Matelo's CD Tziganskaïa and Other Rare Recordings, released by Hot Club Records (subsequently reissued as Tziganskaïa: The Django Reinhardt Waltzes); "Chez Jacquet" was also recorded by Baro Ferret in 1966.

Boulou Ferré

Elios FerréBoulouBoulou and Elios Ferré
His nephews, Jean "Matelo" Ferret's sons Boulou and Elios Ferré continue to perform gypsy jazz.
His father, Matelo Ferret, and his uncle, Baro Ferret, played with Django Reinhardt in the Quintet of the Hot Club of France.

Gus Viseur

His works such as "Panique...!," "La Folle" ("The Madwoman"), "Swing Valse" (written with Belgian-French button accordionist Gus Viseur), and "Le Depart de Zorro" were modernistic, surreal, and dark, part Musette, part modern jazz.

Romani people

RomaniRomaGypsy
He was known by his Gypsy nickname "Baro," which meant "Big One" or even "King" in Romany.

Romani language

RomaniRomanyRoma
He was known by his Gypsy nickname "Baro," which meant "Big One" or even "King" in Romany.

Black market

underground economyblack moneyblack-market
Baro retired as a full-time musician during World War II and devoted himself to running bars and to various black market businesses during the German occupation of Paris, an activity he continued into the early 1970s.

Military history of France during World War II

LiberationFrench Liberationliberation of France
Baro retired as a full-time musician during World War II and devoted himself to running bars and to various black market businesses during the German occupation of Paris, an activity he continued into the early 1970s.

Button accordion

buttonmusetteaccordion
His works such as "Panique...!," "La Folle" ("The Madwoman"), "Swing Valse" (written with Belgian-French button accordionist Gus Viseur), and "Le Depart de Zorro" were modernistic, surreal, and dark, part Musette, part modern jazz.

Bal-musette

musetteBal Musettemusettes
His works such as "Panique...!," "La Folle" ("The Madwoman"), "Swing Valse" (written with Belgian-French button accordionist Gus Viseur), and "Le Depart de Zorro" were modernistic, surreal, and dark, part Musette, part modern jazz.

Jo Privat

He played for many years at Balajo, a musette club in Paris where he worked with Django Reinhardt, the Ferret Brothers, Didier Roussin and Patrick Saussois.

Quintette du Hot Club de France

Quintet of the Hot Club of FranceHot ClubHot Club de France
Musicians such as Baro and Matelo Ferret (both of whom were sometime-members of the Quintette du Hot Club de France), Etienne Patotte Bousquet, and Tchan Tchou Vidal kept the sound of the Quintette alive, often mixing musette waltzes and traditional tunes with the American popular songs and original compositions favored by Django and Grappelli.

Tony Muréna

Tony Murena
He also played with Matelo Ferret, Henri Crolla, Didi Duprat, Jo Privat and Gus Viseur.