Baronet

baronetcyBtBt.baronetsbaronetciesBart.BartBaronetagePremier BaronetSir
A baronet ( or ; abbreviated Bart or Bt ) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (, or ; abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown.wikipedia
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Official Roll of the Baronetage

Roll of Baronets
Comparisons with continental titles and ranks are tenuous due to the British system of primogeniture and because claims to baronetcies must be proven; currently the Official Roll of the Baronetage is overseen by the Ministry of Justice.
The Official Roll of the Baronetage is an official list of baronets compiled by the British Crown Office, a section of the Ministry of Justice, and published by the Standing Council of the Baronetage.

Peerages in the United Kingdom

British peerpeerpeerage
A baronetcy is the only British hereditary honour that is not a peerage, with the exception of the Anglo-Irish Black Knights, White Knights and Green Knights (of whom only the Green Knights are extant).
Baronets, while holders of hereditary titles, are not peers since baronetcies have never conferred noble status, although socially they came to be regarded as part of the aristocracy.

Hereditary peer

Hereditary Peeragewrit of summonswrit
The title of baronet was initially conferred upon noblemen who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament, and was used in this sense in a statute of Richard II.
For instance, baronets and baronetesses may pass on their titles, but they are not peers.

Nobility

noblemannoblenobles
The title of baronet was initially conferred upon noblemen who lost the right of individual summons to Parliament, and was used in this sense in a statute of Richard II. In some continental countries, such as Poland, the nobility consisted of about 5% of the population, and in most countries titles are no longer recognised or regulated by the state.
European ranks of nobility lower than baron or its equivalent, are commonly referred to as the petty nobility, although baronets of the British Isles are deemed titled gentry.

Sir

Messireclergy holding knighthoodsdaun
Like knights, baronets are accorded the style "Sir" before their first name.
Traditionally, as governed by law and custom, Sir is used for men titled knights i.e. of orders of chivalry, and later also to baronets, and other offices.

Lady

ladiesDameetymology of "lady
Baronetesses in their own right use "Dame", also before their first name, while wives of baronets use "Lady" followed by the husband's (marital) surname only, this by longstanding courtesy.
"Lady" is used before the family name of a woman with a title of nobility or honorary title suo jure (in her own right), or the wife of a lord, a baronet, laird, or a knight, and also before the first name of the daughter of a duke, marquess, or earl.

Burke's Peerage

Burke's Peerage & BaronetageBurkeBurke's Peerage and Baronetage
A full list of extant baronets appears in Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, which also published a record of extinct baronetcies.
Burke's Peerage Limited is a British genealogical publisher founded in 1826, when Irish genealogist John Burke began releasing books devoted to the ancestry and heraldry of the peerage, baronetage, knightage and landed gentry of the United Kingdom.

Maureen Dunbar

Dame Daisy Dunbar, 8th BtssDame Maureen Daisy Helen Dunbar, 8th BaronetessDame Maureen Dunbar
The baronetcy passed to her through her predeceased father's line in 1963, making her one of only four baronetesses in British history.

List of baronetcies in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia

Baronet of Nova ScotiaBaronets of Nova ScotiaNova Scotia baronet
In 1619 James I established the Baronetage of Ireland; Charles I in 1625 created the Baronetages of Scotland and Nova Scotia. Baronets of England, Ireland, Great Britain or the United Kingdom (i.e. all except baronets of Nova Scotia) can display the Red Hand of Ulster (sinister (left) hand version) as a heraldic badge, being the arms of the ancient kings of Ulster.
This page lists baronetcies, whether extant, extinct, dormant (D), unproven (U), under review (R), abeyant, or forfeit, in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia.

Mark Thatcher

MarkSir Mark Thatcherher own son
Since 1965 only one new baronetcy has been created, for Sir Denis Thatcher on 7 December 1990, husband of a former British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher (later Baroness Thatcher); their eldest son, Sir Mark Thatcher, succeeded as 2nd Baronet upon his father's death in 2003.
After his father's passing in 2003, he became Sir Mark Thatcher and succeeded to the Thatcher baronetcy, a hereditary title which had unusually been given to his father in 1990 (this being the only baronetcy created since 1964).

Territorial designation

designateddesignated fiefof
All baronetcies are created with a territorial sub-designation, however only more recent creations duplicating the original creation require territorial designations.
It is also an integral part of all baronetcies.

Coat of arms of Ulster

Red Hand of UlsterRed HandCanton of a baronet
Baronets of England, Ireland, Great Britain or the United Kingdom (i.e. all except baronets of Nova Scotia) can display the Red Hand of Ulster (sinister (left) hand version) as a heraldic badge, being the arms of the ancient kings of Ulster. Baronets of Nova Scotia, unlike other baronets, do not use the Baronet's Badge (of Ulster), but have their own badge showing the escutcheon of the arms of Nova Scotia: Argent, a Saltire Azure with an inescutcheon of the Royal Arms of Scotland.
This is known as the 'red hand of Ulster', which is usually shown as a right hand, but is sometimes a left hand, such as in the coats of arms of baronets.

Knight banneret

banneretknights banneretknight-banneret
A similar title of lower rank was banneret.
Ultimately bannerets obtained a place in the feudal hierarchy between barons and knights bachelor, which has given rise to the idea that they are the origin of King James I's order of the baronet.

Thatcher baronets

Thatcher baronetcyThatcher of Scotneya baronet
This listed them in alphabetical order, other than the last five creations (Dodds of West Chillington, Redmayne of Rushcliffe, Pearson of Gressingham, Finlay of Epping and Thatcher of Scotney).
The Thatcher baronetcy, of Scotney in the County of Kent, is a baronetcy created for the husband of Margaret Thatcher, Denis Thatcher, on 7 December 1990, following the resignation of his wife on 28 November.

Nicolson baronets

10th BaronetbaronetcyNicolson Baronetcy
Five baronetcies dormant in 1965 have since been revived: Innes baronetcy, of Coxton (1686), Nicolson baronetcy of that Ilk and of Lasswade (1629), Hope baronetcy, of Kirkliston (1698), St John (later St John-Mildmay) baronetcy, of Farley (1772) and Maxwell-Macdonald baronetcy of Pollok (1682)
The Nicolson baronets refer to one of four baronetcies created for persons with the surname Nicolson, all in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia.

Knight

knighthoodknightedknights
A baronet is addressed as "Sir" (just as is a knight) or "Dame" in the case of a baronetess, but ranks above all knighthoods and damehoods in the order of precedence, except for the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Thistle, and the dormant Order of St Patrick.
A clerk in holy orders who is a baronet is entitled to use the title Sir.

Order of the Garter

KGKnight of the GarterKnight of the Order of the Garter
A baronet is addressed as "Sir" (just as is a knight) or "Dame" in the case of a baronetess, but ranks above all knighthoods and damehoods in the order of precedence, except for the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Thistle, and the dormant Order of St Patrick.
Members are assigned positions in the order of precedence, coming before all others of knightly rank, and above baronets.

Order of the Thistle

KTKnight of the ThistleKnight of the Order of the Thistle
A baronet is addressed as "Sir" (just as is a knight) or "Dame" in the case of a baronetess, but ranks above all knighthoods and damehoods in the order of precedence, except for the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Thistle, and the dormant Order of St Patrick.
When an individual is entitled to use multiple post-nominal letters, "KT" or "LT" appears before all others, except "Bt" or "Btss" (Baronet or Baronetess), "VC" (Victoria Cross), "GC" (George Cross) and "KG" or "LG" (Knight or Lady of the Garter).

Coat of arms of Nova Scotia

armsArms of Majesty in Right of Nova ScotiaArms of Her Majesty in Right of Nova Scotia
Baronets of Nova Scotia, unlike other baronets, do not use the Baronet's Badge (of Ulster), but have their own badge showing the escutcheon of the arms of Nova Scotia: Argent, a Saltire Azure with an inescutcheon of the Royal Arms of Scotland.
The arms are also borne as a heraldic badge by the Baronets of Nova Scotia, a chivalric order of Great Britain.

White baronets

baronetSir George Stanley WhiteWhite of Boulge Hall
There have been four baronetcies created for persons with the surname of White.

Sir Nicholas Bacon, 14th Baronet

Nicholas BaconNicholas Hickman Ponsonby BaconSir Nicholas and Lady Bacon
Sir Nicholas Bacon, 14th Baronet, is the current Premier Baronet; his family's senior title was created by King James I in 1611.
Sir Nicholas is also the Premier Baronet of England.

Earl of Gainsborough

Earls of GainsboroughViscount CampdenViscount Campden (1628)
In 1627 he was created a baronet, of Campden in the County of Gloucester, with remainder to heirs male of his body.

Denis Thatcher

DenisSir Denis ThatcherSir Denis Thatcher, 1st Baronet
Since 1965 only one new baronetcy has been created, for Sir Denis Thatcher on 7 December 1990, husband of a former British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher (later Baroness Thatcher); their eldest son, Sir Mark Thatcher, succeeded as 2nd Baronet upon his father's death in 2003.
In December 1990, following the resignation of his wife as Prime Minister, it was announced that Denis Thatcher would be created a baronet (the first such creation since 1964).

Order of St Patrick

KPOrder of St. PatrickKnight of the Order of St Patrick
A baronet is addressed as "Sir" (just as is a knight) or "Dame" in the case of a baronetess, but ranks above all knighthoods and damehoods in the order of precedence, except for the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Thistle, and the dormant Order of St Patrick.
When an individual was entitled to use multiple post-nominal letters, KP appeared before all others, except "Bt" and "Btss" (Baronet and Baronetess), "VC" (Victoria Cross), "GC" (George Cross), "KG" (Knight of the Garter) and "KT" (Knight of the Thistle).