Barrister

Barrister-at-Lawbarristersbarcalled to the barBar-at-lawcounselthe BarBarrister at LawlawyerBL
A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions.wikipedia
3,729 Related Articles

Lawyer

attorneylawyersattorneys
A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions.
A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, attorney, attorney at law, barrister, barrister-at-law, bar-at-law, canonist, canon lawyer, civil law notary, counsel, counselor, counsellor, solicitor, legal executive, or public servant preparing, interpreting and applying law, but not as a paralegal or charter executive secretary.

Solicitor

solicitorsSolicitor GeneralSolicitor-General
Barristers are distinguished from solicitors, who have more direct access to clients, and may do transactional-type legal work.
There are many more solicitors than barristers in England; they undertake the general aspects of giving legal advice and conducting legal proceedings.

Inns of Court

Inn of CourtInnInns
Barristers are regulated by the Bar for the jurisdiction where they practise, and in some countries, by the Inn of Court to which they belong.
The Inns of Court in London are the professional associations for barristers in England and Wales.

Bar association

barthe barintegrated
Barristers are regulated by the Bar for the jurisdiction where they practise, and in some countries, by the Inn of Court to which they belong.
In many Commonwealth jurisdictions, the bar association comprises lawyers who are qualified as barristers or advocates in particular, versus solicitors (see bar council).

Rights of audience

right of audienceright to protect their rights
A barrister will usually have rights of audience in the higher courts, whereas other legal professionals will often have more limited access, or will need to acquire additional qualifications to have such access.
In English law, there is a fundamental distinction between barristers, who have rights of audience in the superior courts, and solicitors, who have rights of audience in the lower courts, unless a certificate of advocacy is obtained, which allows a solicitor to represent clients in the superior courts also.

Jurist

legal scholarlaw professorjurists
A barrister, who can be considered a jurist, is a lawyer who represents a litigant as advocate before a court of appropriate jurisdiction.
Professionally, in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and in many other Commonwealth countries, the word jurist sometimes refers to a barrister and solicitor, whereas in the United States of America and Canada it often refers to a judge.

Court

court of lawcourtscourts of law
Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions.
The judge or panel of judges may also be collectively referred to as "the bench" (in contrast to attorneys and barristers, collectively referred to as "the bar").

Fused profession

fusedfused legal professionFusion of the legal profession
Historically, the distinction was absolute, but in the modern legal age, some countries that had a split legal profession now have a fused profession – anyone entitled to practise as a barrister may also practise as a solicitor, and vice versa.
Fused profession is a term relating to jurisdictions where the legal profession is not divided between barristers and solicitors.

Cab-rank rule

represent whichever clients came to them
In English law (and other countries which adopt the rule), the cab-rank rule is the obligation of a barrister to accept any work in a field in which they profess themselves competent to practise, at a court at which they normally appear, and at their usual rates.

High Court (Hong Kong)

High CourtHigh Court of Hong KongHong Kong High Court
In the High Court and the Court of Final Appeal, as a general rule, only barristers and solicitor-advocates are allowed to speak on behalf of any party in open court.
A person who has practised for at least 10 years as a barrister, advocate, solicitor or judicial officer in Hong Kong or another common law jurisdiction is eligible to be appointed as a High Court Judge or Recorder.

King's Inns

King's InnIrish barKing's Inns, Dublin
The Honorable Society of King's Inns is the only educational establishment which runs vocational courses for barristers in the Republic and degrees of Barrister-at-Law can only be conferred by King's Inns.
The Honorable Society of King's Inns is the institution which controls the entry of barristers-at-law into the justice system of Ireland.

Bands (neckwear)

bandsbarrister's bandspreaching bands
For example, in Ireland, England, and Wales, a barrister usually wears a horsehair wig, stiff collar, bands, and a gown.
Bands varied from small white turn-down collars and ruffs to point lace bands, depending upon fashion, until the mid-seventeenth century, when plain white bands came to be the invariable neck-wear of all judges, serjeants, barristers, students, clergy, and academics.

Bar Council of Ireland

Irish BarBarcalled to the Irish bar
Most Irish barristers choose to be governed thereafter by the Bar Council of Ireland, a quasi-private entity.
The Bar of Ireland is the regulatory and representative body for barristers practising law in the Republic of Ireland, active since 1897.

Chambers (law)

chambersbarristers' chambersset
) However, barristers normally band together into "chambers" to share clerks (administrators) and operating expenses.
In England and Wales, New Zealand, Australia, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Hong Kong, chambers may refer to the office premises used by a barrister or to a group of barristers, especially in the Inns of Court.

Queen's Counsel

QCKing's CounselKC
Any lawyer may apply to become a Queen's Counsel (QC) to recognize long-standing contribution to the legal profession but this status is only conferred on those practising as solicitors in exceptional circumstances.
In the United Kingdom and in some Commonwealth countries, a Queen's Counsel (post-nominal QC) during the reign of a queen, or King's Counsel (post-nominal KC) during the reign of a king, is a lawyer (usually a barrister or advocate) who is appointed by the monarch of the country to be one of "Her [His] Majesty's Counsel learned in the law".

Advocate

advocatesSenior Advocate Supreme CourtAdvocates Training Programme
In Poland, there are two main types of legal professions: advocate and legal counsel.
The broad equivalent in many English law–based jurisdictions could be a barrister or a solicitor.

Call to the bar

called to the barcalledcalled to Bar
The Legal Practitioner's Act, refers to Nigerian lawyers as Legal Practitioners, and following their call to the Bar, Nigerian lawyers enter their names in the register or Roll of Legal Practitioners kept at the Supreme Court.
"The bar" is now used as a collective noun for barristers, but literally referred to the wooden barrier in old courtrooms, which separated the often crowded public area at the rear from the space near the judges reserved for those having business with the Court.

Devilling

devilledTreasury DevilJunior Counsel to the Treasury (Common Law)
This apprenticeship is known as pupillage or devilling.
Devilling is a period of training undertaken by barristers in Ireland where they work under a more senior barrister (one who has been called for seven or more years but who is not a senior counsel) who is called their master.

Jabot (neckwear)

jabotjabotsrabat
Generally, counsel dress in the traditional English manner (wig, gown, bar jacket and jabot) before superior courts, although this is not usually done for interlocutory applications.
Jabots are prescribed attire for barristers appearing before the Supreme Court of South Australia.

Patent of precedence

patents of precedencepatents of precedence at the bar
Admission to the Inner Bar is made by declaration before the Supreme Court, patents of precedence having been granted by the Government.
Formerly, the rank of king's counsel not only precluded a barrister from appearing against the Crown, but, if he was a member of parliament, entailed that he give up his seat.

Gray's Inn

Grey's InnGray’s InnGray's Inn Square
There are four Inns of Court: The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn, The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, and The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple.
The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London.

Lincoln's Inn

Lincolns InnLincoln’s InnHonourable Society of Lincoln's Inn
There are four Inns of Court: The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn, The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, and The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple.
The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar.

Pupillage

pupilpupil barristerpupillages
This apprenticeship is known as pupillage or devilling.
A pupillage, in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, Kenya, Pakistan and Hong Kong, is the final, vocational stage of training for those wishing to become practising barristers.

Inner Temple

Honourable Society of the Inner TempleInnerInner Temple Hall
There are four Inns of Court: The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn, The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, and The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple.
The Honorable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as the Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London.

Solicitor advocate

solicitor-advocateSolicitor AdvocacySolicitor advocates
In the High Court and the Court of Final Appeal, as a general rule, only barristers and solicitor-advocates are allowed to speak on behalf of any party in open court. Since January 2008, solicitor advocates have also been entitled to wear wigs, but wear different gowns.
Instead, solicitors were required to instruct barristers (in England and Wales) or advocates (in Scotland) to represent their clients in court.