Barry Gray

Barry Gray OrchestraGray
Barry Gray (born John Livesey Eccles; 18 July 1908 – 26 April 1984) was a British musician and composer best known for his collaborations with television and film producer Gerry Anderson.wikipedia
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Gerry Anderson

GerryAnderson EntertainmentGerry Anderson Productions
Barry Gray (born John Livesey Eccles; 18 July 1908 – 26 April 1984) was a British musician and composer best known for his collaborations with television and film producer Gerry Anderson. In 1956 Gray joined Gerry Anderson's AP Films and scored its first marionette puppet television series, The Adventures of Twizzle.
It was Anderson's first work with puppets, and the start of his long and successful collaborations with puppeteer Christine Glanville, special effects technician Derek Meddings and composer/arranger Barry Gray.

Four Feather Falls

This was followed by Torchy The Battery Boy and Four Feather Falls, a puppet Western based on a concept suggested by Gray.
It was based on an idea by Barry Gray, who also wrote the show's music.

Thunderbirds (TV series)

ThunderbirdsThunderbirdInternational Rescue
Although best known for his score to Thunderbirds (in particular the "March of the Thunderbirds" title music), Gray's work also included the themes to all the other "Supermarionation" productions, including Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Joe 90.
Widely considered to be the Andersons' most popular and commercially successful series, Thunderbirds has received particular praise for its effects (directed by Derek Meddings) and musical score (composed by Barry Gray).

Mátyás Seiber

Matyas SeiberSeiberMatyás Seiber
He studied composition under the Hungarian teacher Matyas Seiber.
His students included Peter Racine Fricker, Don Banks, Anthony Milner, Hugh Wood, Malcolm Lipkin, John Exton, Wally Stott (who later became Angela Morley) and Barry Gray.

Torchy the Battery Boy

This was followed by Torchy The Battery Boy and Four Feather Falls, a puppet Western based on a concept suggested by Gray.
Directed by Anderson, it was a collaboration with author Roberta Leigh, with music scored by Barry Gray, art direction from Reg Hill and special effects by Derek Meddings.

AP Films

Century 21 ProductionsCentury 21Group Three
In 1956 Gray joined Gerry Anderson's AP Films and scored its first marionette puppet television series, The Adventures of Twizzle.
APF then went on to make its first wholly independent production of Four Feather Falls, a puppet Western created by Barry Gray (better known for his musical contributions to the company's productions), for Granada Television.

Space: 1999

Alan CarterHelena RussellJohn Koenig
Additionally, Gray is known as the composer for the Anderson live-action series of the 1970s, such as UFO and Space: 1999 (though he was not involved in scoring The Protectors).
The opening credits for the first series featured a dramatic fanfare composed by long-time Anderson associate Barry Gray, whose scores for the series were his final compositions for an Anderson production.

Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons

Captain ScarletCaptain MagentaMelody Angel
Although best known for his score to Thunderbirds (in particular the "March of the Thunderbirds" title music), Gray's work also included the themes to all the other "Supermarionation" productions, including Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Joe 90. Besides composing and conducting orchestral scores for television and film, Gray developed an interest in the Ondes Martenot, which he used to produce unconventional musical notes as well as electronic sound effects in several of his scores, including those for Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Doppelgänger.
The music for Captain Scarlet was composed by Barry Gray, who had scored all prior Supermarionation series.

Joe 90

Although best known for his score to Thunderbirds (in particular the "March of the Thunderbirds" title music), Gray's work also included the themes to all the other "Supermarionation" productions, including Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Joe 90.
The theme and incidental music was composed by Barry Gray.

Blackburn

Blackburn, LancashireBlackburn, EnglandBlackburn Aircraft
Born into a musical family in Blackburn, Lancashire, Gray was encouraged to pursue a musical career from an early age.

Fireball XL5

Fireball XL-5Fireball XL3XL5
Although best known for his score to Thunderbirds (in particular the "March of the Thunderbirds" title music), Gray's work also included the themes to all the other "Supermarionation" productions, including Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Joe 90.
The closing theme, Fireball, written by Barry Gray and sung by Don Spencer, became a minor hit in Britain.

The Adventures of Twizzle

In 1956 Gray joined Gerry Anderson's AP Films and scored its first marionette puppet television series, The Adventures of Twizzle.

UFO (TV series)

UFOReflections in the WaterSHADO
Additionally, Gray is known as the composer for the Anderson live-action series of the 1970s, such as UFO and Space: 1999 (though he was not involved in scoring The Protectors).
In flight they are surrounded by horizontally spinning vanes, and emit a distinctive pulsing electronic whine that sounds like a Shoooe-Wheeeh! (produced by series composer Barry Gray on an Ondes Martenot).

The Protectors

Die Beskermerslater British series from the 1970sProtectors
Additionally, Gray is known as the composer for the Anderson live-action series of the 1970s, such as UFO and Space: 1999 (though he was not involved in scoring The Protectors).
This was the first Anderson series not to feature music composed by Barry Gray.

Supercar (TV series)

Supercarseries of the same nameSupercar'' (TV series)
The ensembles required for Gray's scoring in series such as Thunderbirds and Stingray dwarfed those used in the production of most contemporary television programmes; even the orchestra employed for the first Anderson-produced series to carry the "Supermarionation" label, Supercar, comprised some forty instrumentalists.
The music for the series was composed and conducted by Barry Gray.

Doppelgänger (1969 film)

DoppelgängerJourney to the Far Side of the SunDoppelganger
His work in cinema included the scores to the Thunderbirds feature films Thunderbirds Are Go (1966) and Thunderbird 6 (1968), and the live-action science-fiction drama Doppelgänger (1969). Besides composing and conducting orchestral scores for television and film, Gray developed an interest in the Ondes Martenot, which he used to produce unconventional musical notes as well as electronic sound effects in several of his scores, including those for Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Doppelgänger.
Composer Barry Gray recorded his score, his favourite of all his musical contributions to the Anderson productions, in three days from 27 to 29 March 1969.

Thunderbirds Are Go

first film of the original puppet show
His work in cinema included the scores to the Thunderbirds feature films Thunderbirds Are Go (1966) and Thunderbird 6 (1968), and the live-action science-fiction drama Doppelgänger (1969).
With Walter's editing complete, composer Barry Gray recorded the score in six sessions between 9 and 11 October at Anvil Studios near Denham, Buckinghamshire.

Stingray (1964 TV series)

StingrayInvaders from the DeepStingray'' (1964 TV series)
Although best known for his score to Thunderbirds (in particular the "March of the Thunderbirds" title music), Gray's work also included the themes to all the other "Supermarionation" productions, including Fireball XL5, Stingray, Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Joe 90. The ensembles required for Gray's scoring in series such as Thunderbirds and Stingray dwarfed those used in the production of most contemporary television programmes; even the orchestra employed for the first Anderson-produced series to carry the "Supermarionation" label, Supercar, comprised some forty instrumentalists.

List of film director and composer collaborations

List of noted film director and composer collaborationscollaborationcollaborations between a director and a composer
*List of film director and composer collaborations

Thunderbird 6

His work in cinema included the scores to the Thunderbirds feature films Thunderbirds Are Go (1966) and Thunderbird 6 (1968), and the live-action science-fiction drama Doppelgänger (1969).
Barry Gray considered the musical score for Thunderbird 6 superior to that of Thunderbirds Are Go since its depiction of round-the-world travel provided scope for a large number of musical themes.

List of Space: 1999 episodes

List of ''Space: 1999'' episodesThe ExilesDeath's Other Dominion
Gray's professional association with Anderson and his career in TV and film scoring ended when he decided to leave the production of Space: 1999 after the completion of the first series.

Ondes Martenot

ondistMartenotMartenot waves
Besides composing and conducting orchestral scores for television and film, Gray developed an interest in the Ondes Martenot, which he used to produce unconventional musical notes as well as electronic sound effects in several of his scores, including those for Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and Doppelgänger.
The British composer Barry Gray studied the instrument with Martenot in Paris, and used it in his soundtracks for 1960s films including Dr Who and the Daleks, and Journey To The Far Side Of The Sun.

Dr. Who and the Daleks

Dr Who and the Daleks1960s filmsDr. Who
Gray's knowledge and recognition in the field resulted in commissions to provide electronic music and sound effects for such films as Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965) and Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D., and uncredited work on Island of Terror (1966) and Fahrenheit 451 (1966).

Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.

Daleks – Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D.Daleks - Invasion Earth 2150 ADDaleks' Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D.
Gray's knowledge and recognition in the field resulted in commissions to provide electronic music and sound effects for such films as Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965) and Daleks' Invasion Earth 2150 A.D., and uncredited work on Island of Terror (1966) and Fahrenheit 451 (1966).