Base metal

base metalsbase base metalsbase-base-metal
A base metal is a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to a precious metal such as gold or silver.wikipedia
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Gold

Aunative goldgold dust
A base metal is a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to a precious metal such as gold or silver.
Gold is insoluble in nitric acid, which dissolves silver and base metals, a property that has long been used to refine gold and to confirm the presence of gold in metallic objects, giving rise to the term acid test.

Alchemy

alchemistalchemicalalchemists
A long-time goal of alchemists was the transmutation of a base (low grade) metal into a precious metal.
Common aims were chrysopoeia, the transmutation of "base metals" (e.g., lead) into "noble metals" (particularly gold); the creation of an elixir of immortality; the creation of panaceas able to cure any disease; and the development of an alkahest, a universal solvent.

Noble metal

noble metalsnoblenoble-metal
In contrast to noble metals, base metals may be distinguished by oxidizing or corroding relatively easily and reacting variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen.
In chemistry, the noble metals are metals that are resistant to corrosion and oxidation in moist air (unlike most base metals).

Metal

metalsmetal ionsmetal ion
A base metal is a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to a precious metal such as gold or silver.
Categories described in the subsections below include ferrous and non-ferrous metals; brittle metals and refractory metals; heavy and light metals; and base, noble, and precious metals.

Zinc

ZnZn 2+ zinc alloy
Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc.
The element is normally found in association with other base metals such as copper and lead in ores.

Silver

Agsilver orenative silver
A base metal is a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to a precious metal such as gold or silver.
Including precious metals such as palladium, platinum, and gold gives resistance to tarnishing but is quite costly; base metals like zinc, cadmium, silicon, and germanium do not totally prevent corrosion and tend to affect the lustre and colour of the alloy.

Mining

mineminescopper mine
In mining and economics, the term base metals refers to industrial non-ferrous metals excluding precious metals.
In the early 20th century, the gold and silver rush to the western United States also stimulated mining for coal as well as base metals such as copper, lead, and iron.

Lead

Pblead orelead mining
Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc.
In the European and Arabian traditions of alchemy, lead (symbol in the European tradition) was considered an impure base metal which, by the separation, purification and balancing of its constituent essences, could be transformed to pure and incorruptible gold.

London Metal Exchange

LMELondonMetal
The London Metal Exchange (LME) is the futures exchange with the world's largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals.

Philosopher's stone

Philosopher’s Stonephilosophers' stoneThe Philosopher's Stone
The philosopher's stone, more properly philosophers' stone or stone of the philosophers (lapis philosophorum) is a legendary alchemical substance capable of turning base metals such as mercury into gold (chrysopoeia, from the Greek χρυσός khrusos, "gold", and ποιεῖν poiēin, "to make") or silver.

Chrysopoeia

transmutation transmutationchanging
A long-time goal of alchemists was the transmutation of a base (low grade) metal into a precious metal.

Base

Base (disambiguation)
A long-time goal of alchemists was the transmutation of a base (low grade) metal into a precious metal.

Numismatics

numismaticnumismatistnumismatists
In numismatics, coins often derived their value from the precious metal content; however, base metals have also been used in coins in the past and today.

Redox

oxidationoxidizedreduction
In contrast to noble metals, base metals may be distinguished by oxidizing or corroding relatively easily and reacting variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen.

Corrosion

corrosion resistancecorrodecorrosive
In contrast to noble metals, base metals may be distinguished by oxidizing or corroding relatively easily and reacting variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen.

Hydrochloric acid

HClhydrochloricmuriatic acid
In contrast to noble metals, base metals may be distinguished by oxidizing or corroding relatively easily and reacting variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen.

Hydrogen

HH 2 hydrogen gas
In contrast to noble metals, base metals may be distinguished by oxidizing or corroding relatively easily and reacting variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen.

Iron

FeFe 2+ Fe(III)
Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc. It includes, in addition to the four above, iron and steel, aluminium, tin, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, cobalt, bismuth, cadmium, titanium, zirconium, antimony, manganese, beryllium, chromium, germanium, vanadium, gallium, hafnium, indium, niobium, rhenium and thallium, and their alloys.

Nickel

NiNi 2+ Nickel (Ni)
Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc.

Copper

CuCu 2+ cupric
Copper is also considered a base metal because it oxidizes relatively easily, although it does not react with HCl.

Economics

economiceconomisteconomic theory
In mining and economics, the term base metals refers to industrial non-ferrous metals excluding precious metals.

Non-ferrous metal

non-ferrous metalsnon-ferrousnonferrous
In mining and economics, the term base metals refers to industrial non-ferrous metals excluding precious metals.

Precious metal

precious metalsbullionprecious
A base metal is a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to a precious metal such as gold or silver. In mining and economics, the term base metals refers to industrial non-ferrous metals excluding precious metals.

Aluminium

aluminumAlall-metal
It includes, in addition to the four above, iron and steel, aluminium, tin, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, cobalt, bismuth, cadmium, titanium, zirconium, antimony, manganese, beryllium, chromium, germanium, vanadium, gallium, hafnium, indium, niobium, rhenium and thallium, and their alloys.

Tin

SnGray tintinfoil
It includes, in addition to the four above, iron and steel, aluminium, tin, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, cobalt, bismuth, cadmium, titanium, zirconium, antimony, manganese, beryllium, chromium, germanium, vanadium, gallium, hafnium, indium, niobium, rhenium and thallium, and their alloys.