Baseball field

home platecenter fieldbaseball diamondpitcher's moundCFbatter's boxfoul polevenuemoundhomeplate
A baseball field, also called a ball field, sandlot or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played.wikipedia
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Baseball park

ballparkbaseball stadiumpark
The term can also be used as a metonym for a baseball park.
A baseball park consists of the playing field and the surrounding spectator seating.

Baseball

playerbaseball playerbaseball team
A baseball field, also called a ball field, sandlot or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played.
The players on the team at bat attempt to score runs by touching all four bases, in order, set at the corners of the square-shaped baseball diamond.

First baseman

first base1Bfirst basemen
The other three corners of the square, in counterclockwise order from home plate, are called first, second, and third base.
First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a baserunner to score a run for that player's team.

Second baseman

second base2Bsecond
The other three corners of the square, in counterclockwise order from home plate, are called first, second, and third base.
In baseball and softball, second baseman is a fielding position in the infield, between second and first base.

Ground rules

baseball ground rulesground rulein the field of play
These poles are at the intersection of the foul lines and the respective ends of the outfield fence and, unless otherwise specified within the ground rules, lie in fair territory.
Unlike the well-defined playing field of most other sports, the playing area of a baseball field extends to an outfield fence in fair territory and the stadium seating in foul territory.

Stolen base

SBstolesteal
Since second is the farthest base from home plate, it is the most common target of base stealing.
A stolen base most often occurs when a base runner advances to the next base while the pitcher is pitching the ball to home plate.

Shortstop

SSshort stopshortstops
Second base is typically defended by the second baseman and the shortstop.
Unlike the pitcher and catcher, who must start every play in a designated area (the pitcher must be on the pitcher's mound, with one foot in contact with the pitcher's rubber, and the catcher must be behind home plate in the catcher's box) the shortstop and the other fielders can vary their positioning in response to what they anticipate will be the actions of the batter and runner(s) once the play begins.

Wild pitch

WPWild Pitcheserrant pitch
50 to 100 ft behind home plate is the backstop, which is a wall/fence that will stop wild pitches, passed balls, and foul balls.
In baseball, a wild pitch (WP) is charged against a pitcher when his pitch is too high, too short, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to control with ordinary effort, thereby allowing a baserunner, perhaps even the batter-runner on an uncaught third strike, to advance.

Pitch (sports field)

playing fieldGrass fieldsports ground
A baseball field, also called a ball field, sandlot or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played.

Pitcher

Ppitchedpitching
The batter's box is the place where the batter stands when ready to receive a pitch from the pitcher.
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk.

Pickoff

picked offpick offpick-off
Players who are left-handed are marginally preferable for first base because: first, it is easier for a left-handed fielder to catch a pick-off throw from the pitcher and tag the baserunner; and, second, it is easier for a left handed thrower to make the throw to second base to start a 3–6–3, 3–6–4, or a 3–6–1 double play.
A left-handed pitcher has a clear view of the baserunner because of his position on the pitcher's mound.

Catcher

Ccatcherscatching
A right-handed batter would stand in the batter's box on the left side of home plate from the perspective of the catcher and umpire.
When a batter takes his/her turn to hit, the catcher crouches behind home plate, in front of the (home) umpire, and receives the ball from the pitcher.

Foul ball

foulfoul territoryfouling
50 to 100 ft behind home plate is the backstop, which is a wall/fence that will stop wild pitches, passed balls, and foul balls. Foul poles, if present, help umpires judge whether a fly ball hit above the fence line is foul (out of play) or fair (a home run).
Foul territory or foul ground is defined as that part of the playing field outside the first and third base lines extended to the fence and perpendicularly upwards.

Home run

home runsHRhomer
Foul poles, if present, help umpires judge whether a fly ball hit above the fence line is foul (out of play) or fair (a home run).
In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run.

Time-out (sport)

timeouttime-outtime out
Should the batter wish to leave the batter's box once the pitcher has engaged the rubber, he must first ask the umpire for time-out.
Baseball players and managers of both the offense and defense can request time out for a number of purposes, such as for a batter to step out of the batter's box to better prepare for a pitch, a foreign object entering a batter’s eye such as dust or a bug, for a manager to speak with a player or umpire, or to replace one player with another (for which a time-out is required by the rules), etc. The requested time out is not effective unless an umpire grants it verbally or by hand signal (both hands raised).

Baseball rules

Official Baseball Rulesgrounded outground out
For playing rules relating to the batter's box, see Rules 6.05 and 6.06 of the Official Baseball Rules.
The batter stands in one of the batter's boxes and tries to hit the ball with a bat.

Citi Field

CitiField23,394Flushing, Queens
Those at Citi Field are orange.
Shea Stadium was the only ballpark in the Major League Baseball to feature orange foul poles instead of the standard yellow, a unique characteristic that carried over from Shea Stadium.

Base running

baserunnerbase runnerbatter-runner
Generally, base runners are not required to follow the baseline.
Base running is a tactical part of the game with the goal of eventually reaching home base (home plate) to score a run.

Minute Maid Park

Enron FieldTal's HillAstros Field
Several parks featuring advertising along the length of the foul pole, with the most prominent example being the advertising from Chick-fil-A at both Citi Field and Minute Maid Park (serving as a pun, with "fowl" being another term for a chicken, the primary meat featured by that restaurant chain).
Early stadium sketches from Kansas City-based HOK Sport (now Populous) using the working title "The Ballpark at Union Station" were released to the public on October 11, 1996, where Astros President Tal Smith was open about his suggestions for the stadium including the location of the flagpole in center field and a traditional dirt path from the pitcher's mound to home plate.

Batting (baseball)

batterbattersbatting
The batter's box is the place where the batter stands when ready to receive a pitch from the pitcher.
To keep the game moving at an orderly pace, the next batter due up waits to take his turn in a circle (actually marked or imaginary) between his team's dugout or bench and the batter's box, and is said to be on deck, with the circle known as the on deck circle.

Batted ball

ground ballfly ballfly balls
Multiple World Series championships (including 1924, 1960 and 1986) have been decided or heavily influenced by erratic hops of ground balls.
One or more of several terms are used to describe a batted ball, depending on how it comes off the bat and where in the field it lands.

In flight

flyoutfly outflied out
A ball passing over the wall is dead; if it passes over the wall in fair territory while in flight, it is a home run.
Once a batted ball touches the ground, a fence or wall, a foul pole, a base, the pitcher's rubber, an umpire, or a baserunner, it is no longer in flight.

Dugout (baseball)

dugoutdugoutsbaseball dugout
Relief pitchers usually wait in the bullpen when they have yet to play in a game, rather than in the dugout with the rest of the team.
The prevailing theory of the origin of locating the dugouts below field level is that it allowed spectators seated behind the dugouts to see the field, specifically the home plate area.

Yankee Stadium (1923)

Yankee StadiumYankee Stadium (I)old Yankee Stadium
The idea of a warning track originated in Yankee Stadium, where an actual running track was built for use in track and field events.
On November 8, 2008 former Yankees Scott Brosius, Paul O'Neill, David Cone and Jeff Nelson, all members of the 1998 World Series championship team, joined 60 children from two Bronx based youth groups Youth Force 2020 and the ACE Mentor Program in ceremoniously digging up home plate, the pitcher's mound pitching plate (rubber) and the surrounding dirt of both areas and transporting them to comparable areas of new Yankee Stadium.

Dead ball

deadball is deadtime
A ball passing over the wall is dead; if it passes over the wall in fair territory while in flight, it is a home run.
After a dead ball, the ball becomes alive again when the pitcher stands on the pitcher's plate ready to pitch, the batter, catcher and umpire are ready, and the umpire calls or signals "Play."